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View Full Version : Underwater hatches??


Ryano
03-27-2008, 06:29 PM
I am fairly new to fly-fishing and I am trying to learn as much as possible.. Its sorda became an addiction.:) I have fished enough now to recognize a hatch and typically found what dry to match it with. I was wondering though, are there also hatches that happen underwater?? And if so, how do you know if its happening? I would hate to be missing out on some aewsome fishing..

Thanks,
Ryan

MBWCC
03-27-2008, 07:22 PM
... I was wondering though, are there also hatches that happen underwater?? And if so, how do you know if its happening? I would hate to be missing out on some aewsome fishing...Virtually all hatches start as "underwater" hatches. Some (many) will progress to emergers that you'll find on the surface (what most people think when they hear the word "hatch"), but the fish will often be feeding underwater on the hatch for quite some time (hour or more) before you notice anything going on at the surface or see insects in the air. The usual cue to an underwater "hatch" in progres is that you see the fish begin moving side to side and opening their mouths (you'll see a white "wink" when they open their mouth; you'll see a silver "flash" from their sides as they pick things off the bottom), or the fish collectively move from one location to another (for example from deeper holes up into the shallower tails of riffles, or from deeper holes to shallower water near the bank). Some underwater hatches never really progress to a classic hatch you will eventually see in the air. For example, stone flies will often crawl to the bank and exit there, or some caddis flies will crawl out of the water on the stream vegetation. In those cases, by the time you see bugs in the air the fish feeding opportunity is often dwindling rapidly.

Flyfishjeep
03-27-2008, 09:42 PM
Ryano-
I am currently reading a book from Dave Whitlock called "Guide to aquatic trout foods." It will tell you everything and more that you need to know about whats going on underneath the water. When ever you get a chance to read it I would get your hands on it.
Hopefully this will help.
-Ben

Ryano
03-27-2008, 10:26 PM
I may have to check that one out.. I knew that hatches would start underwater and come to the top, I just didnt know how to tell when they actually "started". My only problem now is a dont hardly ever see fish underwater! I have seen a few flash, but it just dont seem like I see it often. I guess I will just have to do some adjusting on the water and see if I cant try and improve my game a lil' bit.. :)

Thanks again!
Ryan

Jubal
03-27-2008, 11:08 PM
I may have to check that one out.. I knew that hatches would start underwater and come to the top, I just didnt know how to tell when they actually "started". My only problem now is a dont hardly ever see fish underwater! I have seen a few flash, but it just dont seem like I see it often. I guess I will just have to do some adjusting on the water and see if I cant try and improve my game a lil' bit.. :)

Thanks again!
Ryan

get you some good polarized sun glasses...worth every cent to me for spotting fish

sprestwood
03-29-2008, 07:02 PM
Posted is an image of the lifecycle of aquatic incects that are know as mayflies and stoneflies, caddis and midge are similar. Trout feed dominatly on these and are not at all limited to bugs born and raised in the water.

These few aquatic species have thousands of subspecies, that need not be too overwelming. A local area or even an individual stream will have its own set with particular colors and sizes.

The cycle begins as the spinner ejects eggs into the water and continues clockwise. These eggs hatch into the nymphal stage. The emergance and dun stage should not be confused with a hatch because it involves a molting process.

The nymphal stage could last from one the four years. This is why these patterns will be the most useful. The process from emergance to spent could be less 24 hours, it is usually short. These bugs are are usually straight-to-the-point and in-a-hurry when it comes to a courtship, a honeymoon, and a funeral.

Patterns for these later phases are used for a short time but are effective because trout are usually inhaling these patterns indiscriminantly.

It is important to study local and often stream specific incects and make an arsenal presentation of these patterns. General patterns made and sold in bulk across the world lose an edge when it comes to immitation.

Once you have identified bugs to immitate you will shortly develope a lifecycle of each bug for the following years you fish that stream.

This image will eventually seem like a gross over-simplification of bug fishing. After all entomologists are usually PhD's

http://s227.photobucket.com/albums/dd9/sprestwood/LRO/?action=view&current=AquaLifecycle.jpg

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd9/sprestwood/LRO/AquaLifecycle.jpg