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Redfish62
07-10-2008, 07:27 AM
I made my fist attempt at posting a photo using Photobucket.
I made the post under warm water "Little river with son".
The link is there but the photo dose not appeare.
Any info on what I have done incorrectly?

Thanks,
Redfish62

jzimmerman
07-10-2008, 07:31 AM
Make sure you copy and past the picture location in the window that pops up when you click the Insert Image button. Dont just copy and past the location in the text box.

BlueRaiderFan
07-12-2008, 02:11 PM
My camera got wet, so the picture isn't so great, but I caught a nice little 11" bow today on the Caney Fork. I also caught my first Brookie (I'm prety sure it's a brookie).I guess consider the Bow as my official entry.:biggrin:

http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh261/blueraiderfn/Caney%20Fork%202007/100_3127.jpg


http://s258.photobucket.com/albums/hh261/blueraiderfn/Caney%20Fork%202007/?action=view&current=100_3127.jpg

http://s258.photobucket.com/albums/hh261/blueraiderfn/Caney%20Fork%202007/?action=view&current=100_3131.jpg


Oops..Wrong thread!

BlueRaiderFan
07-12-2008, 02:19 PM
Make sure you copy and past the picture location in the window that pops up when you click the Insert Image button. Dont just copy and past the location in the text box.

I did that and it still just shows a link:confused:

Gerry Romer
07-12-2008, 02:53 PM
[quote=BlueRaiderFan;55157](I'm prety sure it's a brookie)

looks like a nice brown to me...

Don't know why the image isn't showing up... the link looks clean.

Did you read Paula's Sticky on how to post pics? maybe the answer's in there somewhere. Here's a link to Paula's Sticky.

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8456

Gerry

BlueRaiderFan
07-12-2008, 03:16 PM
Gerry,

Thanks for the link and the ID lol. I couldn't be certain if it was a brookie of brown. I guess a brookie would have more than just brown and red spots?

BRF

Worrgamesguy
07-12-2008, 03:41 PM
I was shocked to see the GSMNP brookies because they aren't anything like the brookies from the Caney. The brookies in the Caney are stocked, and they have a greenish-grey skin with white spots and white tipped fins. So yours is definitely a brown.

And Photobucket has this awesome feature just for message boards. You go into your main album, so you can see the last pictures you uploaded, and under the pictures it says has 4 different links for different ways of sending pictures such as "Email & IM, direct link, HTML code, and IMG code." IMG code is at the bottom, and when you click the yellow box to the right of the "IMG code" title it automatically highlights and copies the code, so all you have to do is come in here and press Ctrl + V to paste it in here.

And BHPTs are supposed to be fished wet, right? I have trouble seeing which needs to be floated and which need to sink.

BlueRaiderFan
07-12-2008, 03:53 PM
Yeah, all nymphs and scuds are wet flies (I think). I did finally figure out how to get the pictures to work.

bigpopper
07-12-2008, 04:55 PM
Great Pics! Those are nice lookin trout. Congrats again Dwayne! Now I gotta catch some. lol.:biggrin:

Mark<::><

BlueRaiderFan
07-12-2008, 08:47 PM
Thanks BP!:smile:

Gerry Romer
07-12-2008, 11:58 PM
And BHPTs are supposed to be fished wet, right? I have trouble seeing which needs to be floated and which need to sink.

BHPT translates to Bead Head Pheasant Tail. The bead in question need not be a tungsten, but it should be made of some metal which will help it sink... so it's not intended to float. In general, if it's got a bead on it, it's supposed to sink (either on its own or with the help of some strategically placed split shot). Even glass beads should be fished below or in the surface film.

One further generalization: if it's a nymph imitation or larva imitation, it's meant to be fished under the surface film. How deep depends on how deep in the water column the fish are feeding. If it's called a dry or emerger pattern, it's meant to be fished on or in the surface film.

How to fish both at the same time?

So a dry/dropper rig would involve one dry fly tied at the end of the tippet/leader and one nymph/larva/wet fly tied to a piece of tippet which is somehow attached to the dry fly (usually a length of tippet material is tied to the bend of the dry fly hook). The term "dropper" has come to mean a fly that is intended to drop and be fished below the fishing level of the first or lead fly. A dry/dry rig would involve a dry fly tied to the end of the leader/tippet and a second dry fly tied to a length of material attached to the first dry fly (for example, you could tie a parachute Adams to the end of your leader, tie 18" of tippet to the bend of the hook of the Adams, and then tie an ant or a BWO or other small dry fly to the end of the tippet material).

Hope this helps