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View Full Version : Best Rod Under $200


BlueRaiderFan
07-10-2008, 08:36 AM
the cheaper the better. :biggrin:

Troutman
07-10-2008, 09:18 AM
A very broad question. What species and sizes are you wanting to target with this rod? What kind and sizes of flies are you planning on using with this rod?
Fishing techniques? ex..High sticking, use of sinking lines, throwing 60-80ft cast with big flies?

UofMontanaAlum
07-10-2008, 10:20 AM
Just a rod? Why not an entire setup for around $200?

TFO Series 1 rod, Ross FlyStart reel, Royal Wulff Triangle Taper Floating WF Fly Line.

I'm sure LRO would be happy to sell it to you as well. :biggrin:

BlueRaiderFan
07-10-2008, 10:39 AM
A very broad question. What species and sizes are you wanting to target with this rod? What kind and sizes of flies are you planning on using with this rod?
Fishing techniques? ex..High sticking, use of sinking lines, throwing 60-80ft cast with big flies?

Mostly tailwaters of Tennessee and a little use in the Smokey's. 8ft 5 wt. Mid Flex.

BlueRaiderFan
07-10-2008, 10:45 AM
Just a rod? Why not an entire setup for around $200?

TFO Series 1 rod, Ross FlyStart reel, Royal Wulff Triangle Taper Floating WF Fly Line.

I'm sure LRO would be happy to sell it to you as well. :biggrin:


I have a nice Orvis reel and really would like to spend all of the money on a good rod that has good flex and that will last.

Troutman
07-10-2008, 11:21 AM
1st. TFO Finesse in the 4wt 8' 9" This would be the most fun to fish IMO. They make 5wts also.
2nd. TFO Pro series. Good warranty on TFO products
3rd. Cortland CL 5/6 wt 4 piece on sale for $98. in the online cat.
These are good rods they cast really well. A med action rod.

These are only a few suggestions for "new" rods in the price range.

Visit a fly shop and cast as many rods as you can. Take your reel and line. Fly shops let you cast the rod, big box stores do not.

BuckeyeRick
07-10-2008, 11:29 AM
BRF - Since you have an Orvis reel, why not match it with the new Clearwater II rods. They have re-engineered the series and it is far superior to the old Clearwaters. I have cast the 2-pc, 5wt, and I bought the 4-pc, 6wt. I think they are spectacular rods. I tested the II 6wt next to the Orvis MLS, Sage FLi, and the TFP Pro. The MLS was not my fav, but the other 3 were very close and my preference was for the II. The 2-pc's are $159 and the 4-pc's are $189. Mine came with sock and tube, and my brother-in-law's 2-pc came with a very nice divided tube. If you get a chance, cast the II and the TFO, both under $200. Not sure of the TFO, but the II has a 25-year warranty.

BlueRaiderFan
07-10-2008, 12:24 PM
Guys,

Thanks for the suggestions. I will lookinto these and hopefully get a good one. The rod I hvae now is a White River super basic rod and it will cast o.k., but I want something that will shoot the line out. My arm gets tired!:biggrin:

pmike
07-10-2008, 12:58 PM
You might take a look at the St. Croix Avid line of rods. You could get a 4 piece 5 weight for just a little bit over the $200.00 and have one of the best rods made. I have the older version in 4 weight 8'6" and it is a cannon. This rod more than compensates for my lack of skills in that it will cast so easy.

I also have a couple of TFO's and they are great rods as well! LRO has either rod and a few more as well, you may want to stop in if possible and try casting some of the different rods to see which you prefer.

Mike

PeteCz
07-10-2008, 01:31 PM
I want something that will shoot the line out. My arm gets tired!:biggrin:


Make sure you have the proper line wt for the rod you are purchasing. If you already have a reel and flyline, you need to make sure that you match the wt to the rod you are purchasing (ie. 5wt to 5wt).

Having a mismatched flyline to rod will wear you out really fast...

ACinEastTN
07-10-2008, 02:36 PM
I have owned the TFO pro series and currently own a St. Croix Avid. IMHO the Avid is by far the better casting tool. I have my 4wt over lined with 5wt line and it still throws a double BH nymph set up 50 feet no problem. I have even fished some unweighted streamers with it. Have yet to cast a new Clearwater II but have heard good things.

one more cast
07-10-2008, 02:41 PM
Regarding shooting line: Consider the quality of your line. Better quality flyline definitely has less resistance thru the guides.

Like pmike, I also have an avid by St Croix (8' 4wt). It is a med/fast rod, and I chose it because it works well for both dries and weighted nymphs. I have been pleased with the rod. However, if you are interested in dries only, it may be a little fast. I usually fish a dry with a dropper. I would recommend a 9' 5wt for tailwaters.

tennswede
07-10-2008, 04:14 PM
Make sure you have the proper line wt for the rod you are purchasing. If you already have a reel and flyline, you need to make sure that you match the wt to the rod you are purchasing (ie. 5wt to 5wt).

Having a mismatched flyline to rod will wear you out really fast...

Pete, Not always true. I have found that with a somewhat heavier line weight you can slow down a fast rod to make it load better, or put a lighter line to speed it up. You are correct though, thay you don't want to go overboard on this. I wouldn't play with more than one line weight up or down.

PeteCz
07-10-2008, 04:28 PM
Hans, good point, you are very correct. Perhaps I should have said: make sure you don't severely under/overline your rod. I actually overline my 3wt rod with a 4wt and it casts like a dream. But I have alot of trouble trying to cast my 5wt with a 3wt line...different flexes can react differently to mismatched lines.

pineman19
07-10-2008, 05:16 PM
BRF,

I would go along with two previous posters who recommended the St. Croix Avid series fly rods. I have four Avids, 3, 4 weights and a 2 weight. YMMV, but the Avids work really well for my sorry casting stroke. St. Croix has great service as well if you happen to break a rod. I have returned three broken rods to them over the last ten years and they have provided excellent service each. Another plus to me is that the Avid and their other higher end rods are made in the USA. Try some different rods out before you take the plunge and go with what works best for you.


Neal

Gerry Romer
07-10-2008, 05:53 PM
Mostly tailwaters of Tennessee and a little use in the Smokey's. 8ft 5 wt. Mid Flex.

If you're primarily going to be fishing the tailwaters, I would think you'd want a longer, stiffer rod... nothing under 9' and preferably a tip flex. The mountains?? that's a whole 'nother story! I, personally, would keep the White River for the mountains and overline it by about one line weight. Take it over to LRO and test cast some heavier weight lines and you'll probably find one that casts much easier. You don't really need to cast for any great distance in the mountains, whereas most all of the tailwaters I've fished call for some long distance casting and the ability to punch the line into some pretty strong winds.

Any of the rods suggested so far would be really good, economical solutions. I'd just suggest looking at something longer and stiffer (faster action or tip flex).

My .02 ;)

BlueRaiderFan
07-11-2008, 08:43 AM
Thanks for the advice guys. I found a great Hardy 6 footer here at Fly South, but it's $300. Yeah, I'm going to keep my 8.5 footer for the rivers and get a 6-7.5 footer for the mountains (2-3wt). I can get the Hardy rod and reel together for about $600...you know, because I'm rich.:eek:

BlueRaiderFan
07-15-2008, 10:59 PM
http://www.flyrodreel.com/Fly-Rod-and-Reel-Online/April-2008/Gear-Review-13-Budget-and-Backup-Rods/