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Worrgamesguy
07-13-2008, 10:07 PM
What exactly should I do to maximize my fishing on the fly rod when my dad and I are floating the river? I caught a brown with an EHC, and got another raise, but nothing else was interested. My dad got a rainbow on a black zebra midge, missed two, and no more after that. What should we have in our flyboxes that are a MUST for the Caney Fork? He got a BPS gift card and we're gonna stock up on flies. We have 3 different color midges (black, cream, chocolate), I think olive or copper BHPT (will these produce?), and a few other odd assortments like mosquitos and gnats. How exactly are the BH flies supposed to be sunken? I know they will do it automatically but what stops them from catching bottom? I need anything your hands are willing to type out. Keep the terminology simple, I'm still trying to learn! Thank you!

BlueRaiderFan
07-13-2008, 10:42 PM
I get a decent amount of action on scuds. Try any scud size 12-18. The larger the fly the larger the fish that will likely take it. I also had a lot of response to a wooly bugger (olive, but I'm certain other colors woul work a well). I've been wanting to try a clouser minnow and see if I could get a big brown to strike. The Canehy is teaming with trout from what I've seen. Go with larger flies (subsurface) to catch the big ones. You may want to try a dry with a dropper of some sort. Honestly I would try just about anything that runs below the surface if I wanted to catch a lot of fish. 90% of what a trout eats is below the surface, brown and fuzzy and about an inch long. Bright colors work as well. I've had a lot of luck so far on size 16 Orange Scuds and also the same in White. Just my opinion, but I think you'll catch the most by fishing buggers and scuds as droppers with a nice float fly for back up. If you fish the smaller midges, your chances of landing a large trout are smaller than if you fish something bigger, say around a size 12-14.

Disclaimer: All of this advice may be bad.:biggrin:

Worrgamesguy
07-13-2008, 10:52 PM
I've got size 8 and 10 wooly buggers in brown and black, but have NO clue how to fish them properly. I know stripping line, but how much should I strip per pull and when should I stop stripping and cast the fly back out, what length of fly line should be left from the last eyelet on the rod?

And when we were floating over the shoals where there were fishermen, fish were EVERYWHERE. They were all saying that they'd caught one or two, and I giggled inside because I saw where they all were.

And what exactly should I tie on? EHC with a wooly bugger, or what? I need specifics, not necessarily on what exactly to use but moreso than I'm getting.

BlueRaiderFan
07-13-2008, 10:57 PM
I've heard from the TWRA guys that the larger trout have moved down to happy hollow and beyond. I still did o.k. below the dam though.

Worrgamesguy
07-13-2008, 11:18 PM
Haha well they're dead wrong... All those fish my dad and I caught were just a mile or two below the dam. He caught the last two around the last bend before Happy Hollow comes into sight, where the river meets up with another part of the river. If you didn't understand that, imagine you're floating straight downstream, HH comes into sight, and to your left there is another river that joins up also flowing downstream. Get it?

BlueRaiderFan
07-14-2008, 01:07 PM
Got it. I usually alternate my stipping unless I see that a fish is after the fly and then I speed it up a bit (the trout thinks it's trying to get away). You want the fly to look as thought it's feeding...Stop, go, go more, stop etc...If it's a dry fly, that may not work, but it works good on wet flies. I usually cast the line again once I have about 6ft of float line left on the end of my rod. I figure those last 6ft aren't going to make a difference and it saves me an extra cast, which save my arm some use throughout the day. If you are fishing a dry fly, you basically want to just let it drift. You can move it a touch now and again, unless you are fishing a dropper and then it will move a lot as you retrieve line to bring in your wet fly.

Worrgamesguy
07-14-2008, 07:06 PM
Okay here is my fly box as of current. Left to right, top to bottom.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b161/Worrgamesguy/100_1377.jpg

First row:
2 black zebra midges
1 chocolate zebra midge
1 cream zebra midge
3 copper BHPT
1 tan EHC (black EHC currently on rod)
Next 3 unknown (I believe one is an Adams, unsure)

Second row:
1 beat up midge (found it, alone)
1 unknown fly
2 blue wing olives (I think)
1 black gnat
2 mosquitos
1 "rainbow trout"

Next row starting with orange:
1 orange streamer assortment fly
1 grasshopper
1 black BH wooly bugger
1 brown BH wooly bugger
1 dragonfly nymph
1 "mini bugger leech"
1 smaller black wooly bugger
1 olive scud
1 orange scud
1 tan scud

Last row:
2 nymphs from assortment pack
Last 3 are the ancient "crap" flies

BlueRaiderFan
07-14-2008, 08:45 PM
Good looking box. I would fish the big buggers in pools, especially pools that are fed by a water fall of any size. THe big boys wait just below where the water is falling and eat like crazy. Generally speaking, the larger the fly, the larger the fish that will take it. Smaller fish will strike at bigger flies as well, but you up your chances of landing a hog with one IMO. As far as your wet flies, a trout on the caney will take any of those, I believe. Find a nice slow pool in a bend of the river, just where the fast water ends, stop just down stream, toss your big wooly bugger into the fast water (upstream), let it carry it into the pool and start retrieving. It will look like the bugger is swimming down stream and feeding. Just a thought.

BlueRaiderFan
07-14-2008, 08:51 PM
Also, get yourself a couple of clouser minnows. The big hogs like those too.

Realtyman
07-14-2008, 09:58 PM
What exactly should I do to maximize my fishing on the fly rod when my dad and I are floating the river? I need anything your hands are willing to type out. Keep the terminology simple, I'm still trying to learn! Thank you!


You asked for it, so I'm gonna give it to you straight and simple. Leave everything but the fly rod and fly stuff at home:biggrin: I speak from experience. As long as still have the other rods to fall back on when things get slow, you will never become proficient with the fly.

Oh yeah, I would start with the fly at the top left, and fish it 24/7 for at least the first year. After that, you may move on to the next fly in the box:cool:

Worrgamesguy
07-14-2008, 10:33 PM
Good looking box. I would fish the big buggers in pools, especially pools that are fed by a water fall of any size. THe big boys wait just below where the water is falling and eat like crazy. Generally speaking, the larger the fly, the larger the fish that will take it. Smaller fish will strike at bigger flies as well, but you up your chances of landing a hog with one IMO. As far as your wet flies, a trout on the caney will take any of those, I believe. Find a nice slow pool in a bend of the river, just where the fast water ends, stop just down stream, toss your big wooly bugger into the fast water (upstream), let it carry it into the pool and start retrieving. It will look like the bugger is swimming down stream and feeding. Just a thought.

Thanks, I'll take all this into consideration tomorrow.

You asked for it, so I'm gonna give it to you straight and simple. Leave everything but the fly rod and fly stuff at home:biggrin: I speak from experience. As long as still have the other rods to fall back on when things get slow, you will never become proficient with the fly.

Oh yeah, I would start with the fly at the top left, and fish it 24/7 for at least the first year. After that, you may move on to the next fly in the box:cool:

Haha, that's not gonna happen, I enjoy switching but I do like the thought of fly fishing more. I'm gonna use the smallest black wooly bugger tomorrow, and I will switch after a few hundred casts to the black zebra midge or one of the BHPTs.

Gerry Romer
07-14-2008, 11:07 PM
You asked for it, so I'm gonna give it to you straight and simple. Leave everything but the fly rod and fly stuff at home:biggrin: I speak from experience. As long as still have the other rods to fall back on when things get slow, you will never become proficient with the fly.

Oh yeah, I would start with the fly at the top left, and fish it 24/7 for at least the first year. After that, you may move on to the next fly in the box:cool:

Well said! Without a doubt, the best advice to date... too bad it probably won't be taken.

Gerry

Worrgamesguy
07-15-2008, 04:33 AM
Well said! Without a doubt, the best advice to date... too bad it probably won't be taken.

Gerry

:frown:

If I were fishing alone and wading I would without a doubt, but since they are generating I will bring my spin rod because we've caught a few nice sized fish on a spinner after they've started generating. I'm still in the process of making "okay" casts so these trips are mainly to finetune that skill while in a boat- no obstructions to get me caught and tangled on, therefore making me a happier beginner. I think you guys are overshooting my current knowledge.

Grumpy
07-15-2008, 07:44 AM
Years ago when i was in the transition stage, i would leave the fly rod leaning against the tree while i spent more time spinning, everytime i left that rod against the tree, it took time away from my learning.
There isn't enough generation now to hamper a fly rod, think deeper.

I've watched Realtyman progress over the last few years from asking tons of questions to teaching his young son how to catch fish, telling me what he sees on the river & what he does to catch fish, he was bound & determined to learn. He befriended a few folks who helped him, i believe he's laid money down to a few guides(not me though) & he's getting it, sure, he still has a few question's, heck i always have a few question's & can learn from even the rank beginner because thy may see something i don't that maybe relative to catching a fish.
The longer you wait, the longer it takes, maybe you enjoy fishing the spinning rod, that's OK to & maybe you'll never quit using it, that's OK to, it will just take longer to learn the ways of the long rod that way, heck, you're young & have time, if i had taken it seriously at your age, i'd be totally wortless now, as it is, i'm just worthless.

Grumpy

Grumpy

David Knapp
07-15-2008, 10:23 AM
Oh yeah, I would start with the fly at the top left, and fish it 24/7 for at least the first year. After that, you may move on to the next fly in the box:cool:

What he said...:biggrin:

rainshaker
07-15-2008, 11:20 AM
What he said...:biggrin:


Jumping on the bandwagon.....

Nothing against the spinreel but they way I see it, it's a simple, "black or white" way of fishing. The trusty "plug rod" was the way my grandad taught me to fish, but now, I sort of look at that method as "dragging something big and shiny through the water." ......and you can always do that with a fly rod if you feel you're missing some aspect. :smile:

Gerry Romer
07-15-2008, 12:28 PM
Basically, it's the same as when the guy asked how you get to Carnegie Hall...

Practice. Practice. Practice.

You can't expect to become proficient at something without practice. And having any kind of rod handy as a fall back rod takes away from valuable time that could be spent learning because, more often than not, you'll be falling back on what's comfortable the first time you get the least bit uncomfortable with the long rod.

Practice. Practice. Practice.
Gerry

BlueRaiderFan
07-15-2008, 02:46 PM
You don't see too many people whittle their own spincast lures out of a hunk of wood:biggrin: Spin casting is to fishing what Faygo is to soda.

Grumpy
07-15-2008, 02:58 PM
You don't see too many people whittle their own spincast lures out of a hunk of wood:biggrin: Spin casting is to fishing what Faygo is to soda.


ugh, whats' a faygo:redface:

Grumpy

billyspey
07-15-2008, 06:15 PM
grumpy; faygo is those old sweetwater drinks you but at discounts stores when you can't afford the real thing ! leave the boy along let him struggle you going take all the fun out of it , he'll learn soon enough. he'll break that old spinnin rod soon on a carp and be left with longrod he"ll master than. you can lead an old mule to water but you can't make him drinK,

heyski
07-15-2008, 06:20 PM
All I can say is that once you decide that you want to go out to fish and not go out to catch fish you will pick up the fly rod more because of the enjoyment of the sport. Hope that makes sense. Also, start tying your own. I believe that is a key part of the sport that will get you to want to work with the fly rod more. You can learn to tie a midge in 5 minutes.

Stonefly
07-15-2008, 07:58 PM
I totally agree with Heyski. If you want to learn to fly fish, leave the spinning rod at home. You may go thru some hard times but in the end you'll be a fly fisher. It's worth it, imho.

sb

Grumpy
07-15-2008, 08:03 PM
grumpy; faygo is those old sweetwater drinks you but at discounts stores when you can't afford the real thing ! leave the boy along let him struggle you going take all the fun out of it , he'll learn soon enough. he'll break that old spinnin rod soon on a carp and be left with longrod he"ll master than. you can lead an old mule to water but you can't make him drinK,


cool Bill that put you at 101:biggrin: , i'll back out of it.

Grumpy

Worrgamesguy
07-15-2008, 09:16 PM
Okay, this is going to be a long post.

Grumpy- Of course I will never quit using my spin rod cold turkey, but I am already backing away from it. I spent the entire day today working on my casting and practicing different movements and only picked up the spin rod 2 or 3 times. I managed to bring in a 12" brown and a 8" rainbow on a #12 black wooly bugger, and missed a dozen more strikes. I don't even want to go into the number of fish that I had following my bugger throughout the day, so I must be getting better or the fish are more hungry :rolleyes:

Gerry- I agree, but I am trying. You guys gotta take into consideration that I picked up a fly rod for the first time maybe a month ago, and have only been out on 5 or so occasions for me to practice on the water. As I said to Grumpy, I didn't fall back on the spin rod much today, only when my tippet would get tangled and I was too lazy to mess with it. I would get bored of the spin rod, and untangle the tippet and start again.

Billy- I am doing my best, don't lose hope on the beginners! Metaphorically speaking, I am VERY thirsty! :cool:

heyski and Steve- Next trip I will leave the spin rod at home, now that I'm more confident in my fly casting as of today. I'm nowhere near tying my own flies, or have the resources to start, but I will eventually.

Okay so today I learned a lot, like:

Use a tapered leader to make my casts better, I'm currently using just tippet.
Wait for the pull on the backcast before accelerating forward to cast.
Look back occasionally to see how your loop looks.
And some other stuff.

I met and talked with two fly fishermen today that were more than willing to give me advice. I didn't catch the first one's name, but the 2nd guy I talked to was Dan- our very own fishingman62 here on L.R.O. He was a great guy, helped a lot to talk with someone who has experience, and both guys did. The first guy I talked to was absolutely SLAYING fish on an olive midge, and Dan was catching a few occasionally. Nice meeting you, Dan!

Worrgamesguy
07-17-2008, 11:40 AM
Anyone have more for me?

Vern
07-17-2008, 12:15 PM
It took me a while to put the spinning rod aside. once I got my confidence up I just left the spinning rod at home. I like the fly rod trout fishing because I feel it gives me more options of what to present to the fish. If I am getting no results on a dry, I can add a dropper. if that does not work I can swing a bugger or wet fly in the current. Or strip a clousser. I still use a spinning rod at times, working a floating Rapala in the fast water can be a real killer sometimes. Confidence is the main factor, you don't have to have a perfect cast or drift on the Caney, and if all else fails swing an olive bugger in the current. Once you feel confident then head to the mountains, where a good cast and perfect drift is need and you will not pick up a spinner to trout fish again.

Worrgamesguy
07-17-2008, 09:56 PM
The thing I already absolutely HATE about fly fishing is the constant changing of flies. I hate tying fisherman's knots, they're a pain with the smaller flies. I went a few days ago and caught a few on the smallest wooly bugger in my fly box picture, that made me feel better. But I'm learning new things constantly. I can't get my casts straight yet because I don't have the proper leader/tippet setup. I've got one of those straight needles that goes inside of the fly line, and you just attact tippet to that and you're ready to go. I guess I need to go get a tapered leader, and then attach more tippet on top of that and my casts will look better.

Also guys, I'm saving up for one of the TFO Pro series rods, the 5 weight 9' pole. You said to worry more about the rod than the reel, right?

Worrgamesguy
07-19-2008, 12:28 AM
I guess I should merge all of my questions into this thread that way I will never lose track of information. I've been looking at the TFO NXT outfits, my rod and reel are both mediocre at best. Is this a good deal?

VolFan
07-19-2008, 08:24 AM
I don't personally own any of the TFO rods (yet), but they do have very good reputations and would most likely serve you well.

I don't know that I agree with putting a lot more emphasis on the rod than on the reel...escpecially on the Caney Fork. I think you should buy the best rod you can, while still being able to purchase a good reel to match it. The biggest difference between a good reel and a cheap reel is the drag. I've had a couple of "cheap" reels in my time, both of which came with outfits. The drag would mess up on me after a few good uses, especially if the reel happened to get dunked in water.

In the Smokies, I don't know if I can remember a fish ever stripping line off my reel. But on the Caney Fork, it seems like I get into at least one fish every trip that starts pulling line. You don't want a reel with a crappy drag when you're in a fight with a good fish!

My current reel is a Lamson Konic, which I've been extremely happy with. Many people will also recommend the Orvis Battenkill. You can get either right here on LRO's website for under $130. My point is...don't spend all your money on a good rod, then buy a $40 reel to put on it.

Worrgamesguy
07-19-2008, 06:43 PM
All I've heard is "rod rod rod" and nothing about the reel. Honestly, I think I agree with them because it's main purpose is just to keep your line out of the water and let drag out. My reel is 15+ years old from my dad's old setup, and it has the pinky trigger instead of a crank reel. So I'm much more worried about the rod than a reel, but if that NXT outfit is any good that is most likely what I will buy.

Grumpy
07-20-2008, 07:41 AM
The NXT is a good outfit, c/o the Cortland Endurance for $239 as well, both have good warranties to boot.

Grumpy

Worrgamesguy
07-20-2008, 01:58 PM
Is the Cortland better? I own a Cortland rod and I'm not too impressed with it, I've heard a lot of good things about TFO though.

And what flies should my fly box contain multiples of for the Caney? These, and what others?

Zebra midges
BHPTs
Scuds
Wooly buggers
EHCs

BlueRaiderFan
07-20-2008, 02:46 PM
I think those are plenty to catch fish on the Caney. Maybe throw in a couple of dry flies and you should be fine.

Gerry Romer
07-20-2008, 06:21 PM
At a half a dozen Wally Worlds in East Tennessee I've seen a Scientific Anglers "Trout" rod package that's quite serviceable for someone thinking about getting into fly fishing. Rod, reel, line, leader, tippet, flies, and a beginners video for around $80. You can also get a really good Reddington complete "starter" kit at Gander Mountain for around $160. It's a good way to start, with a complete and balanced outfit, that lets you test drive the sport before making a commitment of major $$. That way you'll know exactly what you'll be better off spending your money on.

From the way you've described your setup I'm kinda surprised you're still giving it a try. I'm sure that old line is dead... you really need a tapered leader... you'd probably get a real kick out of some decent Orvis yarn indicators... nymphs are gonna be your bread and butter on the Caney... casting videos are a big help (especially any video featuring Lefty Kreh)... there are tons and tons of instructional videos at YouTube...

Gerry

Worrgamesguy
07-21-2008, 12:14 AM
I replaced the line a few weeks ago, it helped a lot. But my reel is heavy like you would not believe, and I'm not a fan of the way my rod casts. The tip bends and bounces up and down like crazy on the front cast causing my cast to have a bunch of waves in it. I am completely hooked after watching all the fish following my wooly bugger as I stripped line. Considering I've only been on the water 5 times- 3 at a local warmwater river, 2 at the Caney, I think I'm moving along quite nicely. I caught at least 1 bluegill on every trip to the warmwater river, I caught 1 trout on my first trip to the Caney, and on my most recent trip to the Caney I got about 3 or 4 to hand, hooked into nearly a dozen, and missed as many as those combined.

With that being said, I don't need one of those starters kit, that's pretty much what I have now. I need a rod, possibly a reel also, with a good reputation that won't fail me. I've heard a lot of good about the TFO Pro series, but I haven't heard much about nice reels for "cheap (not junky cheap, but cheap enough to where I don't have to donate my spare kidney)."

Vern
07-21-2008, 09:19 PM
I started out with a cheap fly rod and reel, then bought another cheap setup. I couple of guys helped be out by breaking into my boat and stealing every rod and reel I owned, trolling motor, bas tackle box while i was at home with the boat sitting in my drive. the $2,500 dollar check I received from the insurance company went a long ways. I bought a Orvis tls 5 wt with a Battenkill mid arbor reel. The first thing I noticed was the drag was a lot smoother, but the biggest difference to me is the toughness. I was going through a cheap reel every season, mostly bending the rim of the spool or getting small gravel in it because the fit was not real tight or could it be I fall down a lot.. $119 may seem a little high at first, but I have 3 and the oldest is going on it fourth season. I now fish TFO finesse 3wt and a TFO pro 4wt in the mountains and still use my Orvis TLS 5wt on the Caney Fork.

Worrgamesguy
07-21-2008, 10:16 PM
So Orvis is definitely the best money can buy? I'd like something nice to where I don't have to worry, but I'd also like to be able to afford it. The TFO Pro series seems too good to be true at $150.

Gerry Romer
07-21-2008, 11:29 PM
I'd go with the TFO. Orvis has a great warranty, but in my humble opinion, TFO has the better rod and warranty.

Find a shop and cast one. You'll know.
Gerry

Worrgamesguy
07-22-2008, 01:04 AM
If I had a reason to go out east, I'd stop by LRO for all the help I need. But I'm almost in the dead center of TN, and nothing is within reasonable distance except for Bass Pro and they're a bunch of boneheads. I would like to know as much as possible.

jzimmerman
07-22-2008, 07:46 AM
Stop by LRO and test drive a few different rods. You'll be surprised at the difference between them. I bought a TFO PRO 3wt 8'6" rod last Friday and have been really impressed. From reading a lot of your posts it sounds like you should go with a 5wt, being that it sounds like you mostly fish tailwater areas. Everyone has there own opinion about rods but the most important one to consider is your own, so go test cast a few before you make your decision! As far as a reel goes I have a cabelas prestige plus reel on my new 3wt that I have been really impressed with, and a ross fly start reel on my 5wt that has also been good for me. IMO the rod is way more important than the reel; you cast with the rod not the reel.

ALflygirl
07-22-2008, 09:14 AM
Worrgamesguy....
If you are in the center of Tennessee, you should be able to get into Nashville to see Grumpy at Cumberland Transit. Generally, I wouldn't post another shop on LRO's board but Byron even suggested it to you in an earlier thread.(see below) My husband bought a TFO from Grumpy not long ago and loves it. Whatever you buy, you need to cast first.
http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/images/icons/icon1.gif
Worrgamesguy,

Grumpy runs the fly fishing department at Cumberland Transit located on West End Avenue close to the Holiday Inn and across the street from the Parthanon. It is a great shop. I was a customer there for years before moving to the Smokies. I just talked to him a few minutes ago for some boat advice. His name is Ronnie and he is a very knowledgable fly fisherman and a nice guy. He just thinks he is Grumpy. Go there and he will help you. It will be worth the drive.

Byron

Worrgamesguy
07-22-2008, 12:42 PM
How can I cast rods first without buying them? I completely forgot about the West End fly shop, thanks for reminding me. I held a NXT outfit today at Bass Pro and it seemed like a really good setup. The entire setup probably weighed less than my current reel alone. So I definitely need a new reel, also.

Gerry Romer
07-22-2008, 04:57 PM
It's a lot like going to a car lot and test driving a car. Of course Bass Pro and the big box stores could care less, but the dedicated fly shops will encourage you to take a few rods out into their parking lot or wherever and cast them so you can get a good feel for them and make an educated decision/purchase.

You really need to save up some gas money and take a drive over to LRO. They'll show you what a real fly shop is supposed to be, let you test drive rods until your arm's ready to fall off, and then cherry pick some spots in the park where you can put your newfound skills to the test.

Worrgamesguy
07-23-2008, 03:13 PM
Okay I got skunked on the fly rod today. I had a buddy with me and he was spin "fishing (dropping the bait at his feet)" and doing no good also (the reason why he was fishing at his feet). He didn't believe me when I said I could catch fish, and I caught an 8" brown a few hundred yards under the dam. We moved down to the rest area and I fished with a spinner for about 30 minutes before I caught a fish. I saw him flash, hit it, but there was a weight at the end of the line that wasn't fighting. When I got this beautiful brookie to hand, I had him hooked through the tongue, took it out, and expected him to speed off to the depths. No, he stayed there, turned upside down. I did all I could to get him to swim off and he just sat there, occasionally swimming in a circle upside down. I felt bad, he was a decent little brookie.

But I flashed two HUGE trout, and if either of them got ahold of my spinner it would have been my largest trout that I've ever caught. They were both easily 24"+.

BlueRaiderFan
07-23-2008, 07:46 PM
Wait a minute...I went over to Cumberland Transit the other week. Walked all over the place and didn't see any fly fishing stuff and then drove to Fly S***h. (BTW I always try and buy some stuff at LRO when I go to the Smokies). I wish LRO would open a small store in Nashville. I volunteer to manage it :biggrin:

ALflygirl
07-23-2008, 10:14 PM
BRF...
It is back by the shoe dept.

Grumpy
07-23-2008, 10:45 PM
Wait a minute...I went over to Cumberland Transit the other week. Walked all over the place and didn't see any fly fishing stuff and then drove to Fly S***h. (BTW I always try and buy some stuff at LRO when I go to the Smokies). I wish LRO would open a small store in Nashville. I volunteer to manage it :biggrin:

why would anyone want to give up weekends/fishing time to manage a flyshop for low pay, no vacations, benefit's or a personal life:confused:

Grumpy

Worrgamesguy
07-23-2008, 11:34 PM
why would anyone want to give up weekends/fishing time to manage a flyshop for low pay, no vacations, benefit's or a personal life:confused:

Grumpy

That's love if I've ever seen it. :redface:

BlueRaiderFan
07-24-2008, 08:40 AM
BRF...
It is back by the shoe dept.

Dang it! My observation skills are low.:eek:

Gerry Romer
07-24-2008, 05:25 PM
Dang it! My observation skills are low.:eek:

"Do these fish need to eat? I mean, seriously. Skunked again. I went a mile up the trail head at Elkmont like everyone said and nothing. After four hours of fishing, I saw two trout and caught none. I either didn't go far enough or I just can't fish. I hate trout."

For a minute there I thought we were back in the "I Hate the Smokies" thread... :biggrin:

First you find the gear, then you buy the gear, then you take it to the mountains, then you be very, very, sneaky and you catch fish. But obviously, if you can't find the gear...

BlueRaiderFan
07-24-2008, 07:24 PM
"Do these fish need to eat? I mean, seriously. Skunked again. I went a mile up the trail head at Elkmont like everyone said and nothing. After four hours of fishing, I saw two trout and caught none. I either didn't go far enough or I just can't fish. I hate trout."

For a minute there I thought we were back in the "I Hate the Smokies" thread... :biggrin:

First you find the gear, then you buy the gear, then you take it to the mountains, then you be very, very, sneaky and you catch fish. But obviously, if you can't find the gear...

Oh yeah? Well:

:mad:

gutshot
07-25-2008, 05:50 AM
Is the Cortland better? I own a Cortland rod and I'm not too impressed with it, I've heard a lot of good things about TFO though.

And what flies should my fly box contain multiples of for the Caney? These, and what others?

Zebra midges
BHPTs
Scuds
Wooly buggers
EHCs

Did yuo ever end up getting and midges, 'tails, or scuds? When are you planning on going next? Might find some help on the river this weekend.

GS

Worrgamesguy
07-25-2008, 11:39 AM
As of current I have two BH black zebra midges, one BH chocolate midge, and a regular cream midge. I've got 3 BHPTs I think all in copper, and an olive and tan scud.

gutshot
07-25-2008, 10:28 PM
As of current I have two BH black zebra midges, one BH chocolate midge, and a regular cream midge. I've got 3 BHPTs I think all in copper, and an olive and tan scud.

Well, if you are going fishing this weekend, post up the locations....and someone night show up to help you out....

Still using the auto reel?

GS

Worrgamesguy
07-26-2008, 02:32 AM
I won't be going this weekend, my weekend is packed. I usually walk down a bit from the stairs they just built. And yes I'm still using the auto reel, for now.

Worrgamesguy
07-27-2008, 11:12 PM
Still looking for more tips and pointers on how to fish the Caney properly.