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Worrgamesguy
09-06-2008, 11:50 PM
I've decided that I'm buying a new setup. From what I've gathered, people say the TFO Professional series is by far the best rod for the price. I went up to see Grumpy at Cumberland Transit and he let me test drive one, and I thought it was pretty good, but I'm here for a second opinion. What reel should I buy? I'd be willing to spend about $100 on the reel alone. What features should I be looking for besides weight and drag? And for the line, I want GOOD line, I'm not going to drop $100 on that Sharkskin stuff but I'd be willing to go $60-70ish for the line. Thanks!!!

jeffnles1
09-07-2008, 12:15 AM
I've decided that I'm buying a new setup. From what I've gathered, people say the TFO Professional series is by far the best rod for the price. I went up to see Grumpy at Cumberland Transit and he let me test drive one, and I thought it was pretty good, but I'm here for a second opinion. What reel should I buy? I'd be willing to spend about $100 on the reel alone. What features should I be looking for besides weight and drag? And for the line, I want GOOD line, I'm not going to drop $100 on that Sharkskin stuff but I'd be willing to go $60-70ish for the line. Thanks!!!

It's tough to answer your questions without knowing what you plan to do and how you want to use the outfit.

Reels - For your price, check out the Orvis Battenkill Bar Stock (BBS) reels. Just a little more, the Orvis Mid Arbor. Great reels in your price range. For more money, it's hard to beet the Ross reels. I have a couple Rhythms (I hear they will be discontinued soon for some new reel) and they are outstanding. I have all three mentioned. I'd order them Ross, Orvis Mid Arbor, Orvis BBS.

Rods - That's kind of like do you prefer blond, brunette or red heads? I don't own the TFO Pro but the ones I've tried seemed like nice rods. I'm kind of a Scott G2 and Winston B2T guy myself but you may not want to drop that kind of change on a rod. I've also used the TFO Finesse series and was very impressed.

Line - again, blond, or red head? I have on various rods now, Rio Gold, Rio Selective Trout, Orvis Wonderline, and Scientific Anglers Mastery. All are good. I am kind of partial to the Rio Gold and the SA Mastery. But those lines also happen to be on my two favorite rods so my opinion may be a bit one sided. I don't think you'll go wrong with any of them and they're much less than Sharkskin. All of the ones I mentioned come in the price range you mentioned.

Hope this helps.

Jeff

Worrgamesguy
09-07-2008, 01:39 AM
Hey Jeff it all works, thanks. I'm getting a 9' 5 WT for the Caney. I'm just lost on what to look for in "quality" gear.

Grumpy
09-07-2008, 07:17 AM
As Jeff mentioned, the BBS form Orvis is great, for a few $$ less, the plain 'ol Battenkill is hard to beat with the same drag:eek:
Lines, blond, brunette or redheads, i like redheads:biggrin: I'm familiar with the Wulff TT, Cortland Western Drifter or the Orvis Easy mend, these are slightly heavier in the front end & should help you load the rod a litttle easier.
Lines today are just like tweaking my old GTO'S from years past, you can take them & turn an ordinary rod into something dynamite.

Grumpy

TroutAssassin
09-07-2008, 11:04 AM
If you want an affordable quality setup that will last a long long time. Get an Orvis BBS reel, a TFO Pro series rod, and Orvis Clearwater line (great for first time casters and around 30 dollars) or Orvis Silver label Hy-Flote line for about 40 dollars. Both of these lines have a welded loop for easy leader changes. You wont be disappointed with a setup like this.

DrewDelashmit
09-07-2008, 12:34 PM
You seem to have decided on the rod, so now the question is the reel and line.

Let's be honest, a drag is a nice thing to have but not really that necessary for general trout fishing. With that in mind there are a ton of options out there. One thing to consider is how well the reel you choose balances the rod you buy. The Orvis suggestions are great, I also think that Lamson is making a less expensive reel these days that might be something to look into.

In regards to line, I'm a little behind the 8 ball on trout lines. I recently got a new 4 weight outfit and put a Rio Gold line on it. Although I have only fished it a couple of times, the line seems to cast well and floats high, making for easy mending. SA Mastery lines are also great.

Worrgamesguy
09-07-2008, 01:24 PM
As Jeff mentioned, the BBS form Orvis is great, for a few $$ less, the plain 'ol Battenkill is hard to beat with the same drag:eek:
Lines, blond, brunette or redheads, i like redheads:biggrin: I'm familiar with the Wulff TT, Cortland Western Drifter or the Orvis Easy mend, these are slightly heavier in the front end & should help you load the rod a litttle easier.
Lines today are just like tweaking my old GTO'S from years past, you can take them & turn an ordinary rod into something dynamite.

Grumpy

So what is the difference in all the Battenkill series? I was looking at the BBS II for $99, but I don't know what I'm supposed to be looking for in my reel. It looks great, but what sets it apart from the others? And what fly line was in that Ross reel I casted with? That seemed like a great, lightweight line.

If you want an affordable quality setup that will last a long long time. Get an Orvis BBS reel, a TFO Pro series rod, and Orvis Clearwater line (great for first time casters and around 30 dollars) or Orvis Silver label Hy-Flote line for about 40 dollars. Both of these lines have a welded loop for easy leader changes. You wont be disappointed with a setup like this.

That second suggestion sounds nice. My dad already bought one of those EZ Tiers so it's not imperitive that they have loops, but when I used the EZ Tier there was a little nub of the thickest part of the leader that stuck out and my line and tippet would always get caught in it. So maybe I need those welded loops.

You seem to have decided on the rod, so now the question is the reel and line.

Let's be honest, a drag is a nice thing to have but not really that necessary for general trout fishing. With that in mind there are a ton of options out there. One thing to consider is how well the reel you choose balances the rod you buy. The Orvis suggestions are great, I also think that Lamson is making a less expensive reel these days that might be something to look into.

In regards to line, I'm a little behind the 8 ball on trout lines. I recently got a new 4 weight outfit and put a Rio Gold line on it. Although I have only fished it a couple of times, the line seems to cast well and floats high, making for easy mending. SA Mastery lines are also great.

I don't think the Pro can be beaten by anything in it's price range, especially with TFO's warranty. I'm scared not to have drag because the Caney does hold some monsters and I would HATE to have a poorly tied knot and no drag that caused me to lose a trophy fish. I've heard good things about SA lines.

jeffnles1
09-07-2008, 01:50 PM
Wow,
Tough questions.

Reels, Well, there are lots of different kinds. Drag and no drag. Actually even no drag has a pawl that rubs against a gear (kind of like a playing card against the spokes of your bicycle). How much pressure is placed on the clicker will make it more difficult for the spool to turn and thus a drag.

Then there different drags, cork, synthetic, any number of materials. Essentially, they apply friction to the backward turning of the spool (line out).

Next, there are traditional, mid arbor and large arbor. That is how big around the center part of the reel (the part the line actually winds around) is. In theory, the larger the arbor, the faster one can take up line (each rotation of the handle brings in more line).

Large arbor seems to be all the rage. I guess it's a viable theory but I've never really seen the big deal.

The Orvis BBS has a synthetic drag (read not cork) and a standard size arbor. It's a very traditional styled reel both in form and size. Functions like a modern reel with the drag.

The other Orvis reels have slightly different configurations of drag and the mid size arbor (mid arbor, catchy name...) and the Large Arbor.

Ross, Lamson, Orvis, etc. etc. all have one variation or another of these and they all claim theirs to be the best thing since sliced bread.

They will all work and work well. For the price range you're mentioning, the Orvis BBS is hard to beat.

One thing, some fly reels are lighter than others. The watchout for ultra light weight (like the Ross Evolution) is they can be more fragile than the heavier reels. Two ways to make a reel light, use ligher weight alloys, or cut more and larger holes to remove metal (which is heavier than air.). Ross reels are well made and I've never heard a problem, but the Rhythm is about 1/2 oz heavier than the Evolution series and looks a lot more sturdy. I may be worng on that account. But I would assume a solid block of metal would be stronger than one that was full of holes and the webbing between the holes was very thin.

Line, hey, they all pretty much work. You seem to be willing to spend in the $50-70 range. That's going to get you any of the higher end lines.

For 80% of your fishing, the reel is just going to be a way to keep your line from tangling around your feet. 19% you may actually use the drag, and 1% you will actually need the drag.

With the line, you'll be using it 100% of the time. EVERY cast to every fish will rely upon the line.

When I first got started in this, folks told me to skimp on the reel if I had to, but buy the best line you can afford.

I think that was good advice.

Jeff

Worrgamesguy
09-07-2008, 02:54 PM
So should I buy a cheaper reel, and then buy SA Sharkskin line? I want a good all around "best for the price" setup. I would hate to hook into a 20"+ brown on the Caney and have something fail that I could have prevented, like a junky reel or something like that.

Nharrier
09-07-2008, 03:32 PM
For whatever it is worth; determine your total budget ,put your money in a quality rod that matches your application, quality line that matches your rod and application, and a reel that will balance your rod so that the setup is comfortable to you. In that order. A clicker reel that is palmed properly will get you through many a big fish. Let's face it we all want a fish bigger than the drag we have. Besides it make for a good story! I can't help but remember the reels we fished with 25 years ago. I bet there are guys out there still using a medalist, a darn good reel. Ocassionally I do.

All of the products mentioned above will meet your needs, it is a matter of preference.

Ain't it fun!! What else would we do with our time when we are not fishing?!!

fly fisherman DK
09-07-2008, 05:24 PM
I just got me a new setup that consists of a TFO proffesional series 3 wt rod, an orvis battenkill mid-arbor 2 reel, cortland 444 clear creek taper fly line and orvis dacron backing. I've only cast it in my yard and already have fellen in love with it. Ebay is a great place to get a brand new setup for cheap:biggrin: . If I were you I would definetly get the TFO pro series rod.

fly fisherman DK

David Knapp
09-07-2008, 08:18 PM
Don't bother with the Sharkskin for what you are wanting to do...it is an amazing line but for the fishing you're doing a $50-$60 line will be fine. As to the benefit of the BBS over the original Battenkill, the BBS is simply lighter due to the materials used. If I was you, I would put both reels on the rod and decide which one balances the rod better for you. That's the key...getting something that feels good to you. Some rods that are a little heavier feel better with a slightly heavier reel because it balances the rod better. Good luck with selecting the new setup! Sometimes it can be a bewildering process...

Worrgamesguy
09-07-2008, 08:27 PM
Well guys, I just spent $20 on new flies for this weekend and next weekend. I got 3 sz 18 black zebra midges, 2 sz 20 black zebra midges, 2 sz 18 red zebra midges, 2 sz 14 tan EHCs, and 2 sz 16 tan EHCs. I'm pretty psyched.

For whatever it is worth; determine your total budget ,put your money in a quality rod that matches your application, quality line that matches your rod and application, and a reel that will balance your rod so that the setup is comfortable to you. In that order. A clicker reel that is palmed properly will get you through many a big fish. Let's face it we all want a fish bigger than the drag we have. Besides it make for a good story! I can't help but remember the reels we fished with 25 years ago. I bet there are guys out there still using a medalist, a darn good reel. Ocassionally I do.

All of the products mentioned above will meet your needs, it is a matter of preference.

Ain't it fun!! What else would we do with our time when we are not fishing?!!

I really liked the TFO Pro that Grumpy let me try out. I dunno what to expect from a reel, so that's why I came to you guys.

I just got me a new setup that consists of a TFO proffesional series 3 wt rod, an orvis battenkill mid-arbor 2 reel, cortland 444 clear creek taper fly line and orvis dacron backing. I've only cast it in my yard and already have fellen in love with it. Ebay is a great place to get a brand new setup for cheap:biggrin: . If I were you I would definetly get the TFO pro series rod.

fly fisherman DK

Sounds awesome man. Thanks to TroutAssassin I think this is what I will be buying:

TFO Pro series 9'0" 5 WT
Orvis BBS
Orvis Silver Label line

Don't bother with the Sharkskin for what you are wanting to do...it is an amazing line but for the fishing you're doing a $50-$60 line will be fine. As to the benefit of the BBS over the original Battenkill, the BBS is simply lighter due to the materials used. If I was you, I would put both reels on the rod and decide which one balances the rod better for you. That's the key...getting something that feels good to you. Some rods that are a little heavier feel better with a slightly heavier reel because it balances the rod better. Good luck with selecting the new setup! Sometimes it can be a bewildering process...

I'm all confused :confused: You know what I'm looking for more than most of these guys, because we have fished together. In your completely honest opinion, does the setup I listed above sound good for what I'm looking to do?

Gerry Romer
09-07-2008, 09:42 PM
Hey Trey --

I agree with pretty much everything Jeff had to say.

IMHO, the TFO Pro is a great rod for the money and you cannot beat their warranty! (more on that later). A note about rod length. You really need to think about where you'll be doing most of your fishing. I think, for most tailwaters, you're better off with at least 8'6" in rod length. And if 8'6" is good, then 9' is even better. If you were going to fish mostly mountain streams, you'd do well with anything from 6' to 9' depending on the type of fishing you're up for. On the tailwaters, a slightly longer rod will help you control a bit more line.

For my money, you can't beat the Orvis reels. My own personal fave right now is my new 8' TFO Pro 4 wt. teamed with an Orvis BBS II. The reel is compact, lightweight, and balances the rod nicely. I've also got the Orvis Battenkill Mid-Arbor reel for my 5 weights. It's a bit bulkier and I do notice the weight difference. I can't fish the Mid-Arbor on my 4 wt. rods... just feels "off". But, conversely, I can fish the BBS II on my 5 wt. rods quite comfortably...

Let's talk about drag for a minute. What are you gonna need drag for?? If you tie into a 20" Caney brown, you're gonna be worrying about a whole bunch of things besides drag. In your situation, the drag setting on any reel is only going to determine how easily you can strip line off the reel when casting. If you set your drag "tight", you'll find it difficult to strip line off the real when casting. Conversely, if the drag is set too "loose", you'll strip line too easily and end up with bird's nests on the reel.

As far as wrestling a monster brown goes... remember when that guy downstream from us at Lancaster tied into that 17" brown and was trying not to bulldog him too hard 'cause he had him on 7x tippet?? The thing is, when you've got a big fish on light tippet you've got to "play him" a whole lot differently than you would if you were spin fishing. You can't just reel it in... it becomes a give and take thing (you give, he takes... then he gives and you take it back) until you've got it close enough to figure out what you're gonna do with it. Depending on the "X" factor, you'll play each fish differently. You'll play a 5x tippet a whole lot differently than a 7x tippet. You can break off a good fish on a 7x a whole lot quicker than one on a 5x. So, for all practical purposes, drag is really a non-issue.

Back to that "warranty". A few weeks ago, I broke my TFO Pro series rod. It was an 8'6" 4wt. rod that I used both in the park and on tailwaters. I really liked that rod. The history and background of that particular rod was - at best - questionable. Let's just say that I wasn't the original warranty holder. Nevertheless, TFO replaced the rod - no questions asked! The thing is, when Daniel sent the rod back for me, he listed it as an 8' 4 wt, when in reality it was an 8'6" 4wt. Apparently they didn't even look at the rod and just went by Daniel's request slip because what they shipped was an 8' 4wt. No problem. The 8' is a better mountain rod for me. So I'm pretty happy with TFO right now.

The TFO Professional is more of a Mid-flex rod. The TFO Finesse is more of a full-flex and the TFO TiCr is more of a tip-flex rod. If I were you, I'd get Grumpy to let me test drive all three. You may find that the TiCr is more suited to your style. I doubt that the Finesse would be much to your liking... it'll feel too "soft".

Lines. If you're willing to spend $60 on a line you'll do just fine. Let Grumpy steer you here. At $60, most manufacturers offer some pretty darn good lines. You don't need the Sharkskin right now and may not need it for years - if ever. I have a personal preference for RIO's Nymph line. It seems to be their successor to their old "Pocket Water" line that I used to fish. It's got this great big head that makes it easy to get the line out where I need it. The drawback is that the head is so big that, when I go for distance casts, the loop collapses. For tailwater/distance casting, I've got a 5 wt Sharkskin line on a Battenkill Mid-Arbor. It does okay, but I'm not thrilled with it.

Bottom Line?? My recommendation would be TFO Pro or TiCr in 8'6" or 9' length -- either 4 or 5 weight - matched with an Orvis BBS II reel loaded with an appropriate RIO Nymph line -- or let Grumpy pick the line for you, smile nicely and say, "Thank you Mr. Grumpy..."

Gerry

Worrgamesguy
09-08-2008, 02:56 PM
Hey Trey --

I agree with pretty much everything Jeff had to say.

IMHO, the TFO Pro is a great rod for the money and you cannot beat their warranty! (more on that later). A note about rod length. You really need to think about where you'll be doing most of your fishing. I think, for most tailwaters, you're better off with at least 8'6" in rod length. And if 8'6" is good, then 9' is even better. If you were going to fish mostly mountain streams, you'd do well with anything from 6' to 9' depending on the type of fishing you're up for. On the tailwaters, a slightly longer rod will help you control a bit more line.

For my money, you can't beat the Orvis reels. My own personal fave right now is my new 8' TFO Pro 4 wt. teamed with an Orvis BBS II. The reel is compact, lightweight, and balances the rod nicely. I've also got the Orvis Battenkill Mid-Arbor reel for my 5 weights. It's a bit bulkier and I do notice the weight difference. I can't fish the Mid-Arbor on my 4 wt. rods... just feels "off". But, conversely, I can fish the BBS II on my 5 wt. rods quite comfortably...

Let's talk about drag for a minute. What are you gonna need drag for?? If you tie into a 20" Caney brown, you're gonna be worrying about a whole bunch of things besides drag. In your situation, the drag setting on any reel is only going to determine how easily you can strip line off the reel when casting. If you set your drag "tight", you'll find it difficult to strip line off the real when casting. Conversely, if the drag is set too "loose", you'll strip line too easily and end up with bird's nests on the reel.

As far as wrestling a monster brown goes... remember when that guy downstream from us at Lancaster tied into that 17" brown and was trying not to bulldog him too hard 'cause he had him on 7x tippet?? The thing is, when you've got a big fish on light tippet you've got to "play him" a whole lot differently than you would if you were spin fishing. You can't just reel it in... it becomes a give and take thing (you give, he takes... then he gives and you take it back) until you've got it close enough to figure out what you're gonna do with it. Depending on the "X" factor, you'll play each fish differently. You'll play a 5x tippet a whole lot differently than a 7x tippet. You can break off a good fish on a 7x a whole lot quicker than one on a 5x. So, for all practical purposes, drag is really a non-issue.

Back to that "warranty". A few weeks ago, I broke my TFO Pro series rod. It was an 8'6" 4wt. rod that I used both in the park and on tailwaters. I really liked that rod. The history and background of that particular rod was - at best - questionable. Let's just say that I wasn't the original warranty holder. Nevertheless, TFO replaced the rod - no questions asked! The thing is, when Daniel sent the rod back for me, he listed it as an 8' 4 wt, when in reality it was an 8'6" 4wt. Apparently they didn't even look at the rod and just went by Daniel's request slip because what they shipped was an 8' 4wt. No problem. The 8' is a better mountain rod for me. So I'm pretty happy with TFO right now.

The TFO Professional is more of a Mid-flex rod. The TFO Finesse is more of a full-flex and the TFO TiCr is more of a tip-flex rod. If I were you, I'd get Grumpy to let me test drive all three. You may find that the TiCr is more suited to your style. I doubt that the Finesse would be much to your liking... it'll feel too "soft".

Lines. If you're willing to spend $60 on a line you'll do just fine. Let Grumpy steer you here. At $60, most manufacturers offer some pretty darn good lines. You don't need the Sharkskin right now and may not need it for years - if ever. I have a personal preference for RIO's Nymph line. It seems to be their successor to their old "Pocket Water" line that I used to fish. It's got this great big head that makes it easy to get the line out where I need it. The drawback is that the head is so big that, when I go for distance casts, the loop collapses. For tailwater/distance casting, I've got a 5 wt Sharkskin line on a Battenkill Mid-Arbor. It does okay, but I'm not thrilled with it.

Bottom Line?? My recommendation would be TFO Pro or TiCr in 8'6" or 9' length -- either 4 or 5 weight - matched with an Orvis BBS II reel loaded with an appropriate RIO Nymph line -- or let Grumpy pick the line for you, smile nicely and say, "Thank you Mr. Grumpy..."

Gerry

I always appreciate your help, Gerry. I think for sure I'm gonna be getting the TFO Pro with the BBS II, line is the last decision. Thanks for all the help, guys! I'll be fishing the Caney the next 2 weekends, I bought a few red midges because I could have sworn someone said they hammered red midges.

Gerry Romer
09-08-2008, 10:59 PM
Red and black... try a red with a black wire and a black with a red wire. both with a silver tungsten bead. That's the last midge I was fishing as we moved into the fog...

Let Grumpy guide you online selection and you'll do just fine. Just for kicks, ask him if he's got any furled leaders....

Gerry

Worrgamesguy
09-09-2008, 02:46 PM
Red and black... try a red with a black wire and a black with a red wire. both with a silver tungsten bead. That's the last midge I was fishing as we moved into the fog...

Let Grumpy guide you online selection and you'll do just fine. Just for kicks, ask him if he's got any furled leaders....

Gerry

They're red with silver wire and beads. But I caught all of mine on the black with silver wire and beads. I can't wait for Sunday :biggrin:

Speaking of Sunday, how should you fly fish from a boat? cast to 10-11 o'clock, 9 & 3 o'clock, or more behind?

ttas67
09-10-2008, 08:37 PM
trey, a BBSII is going to be small on a 9' 5wt rod. go with a BBSIII. That's what I have on a 9' 5wt and it does well.

Worrgamesguy
09-10-2008, 10:25 PM
trey, a BBSII is going to be small on a 9' 5wt rod. go with a BBSIII. That's what I have on a 9' 5wt and it does well.

Grrreat... More saving :p

jeffnles1
09-10-2008, 10:37 PM
trey, a BBSII is going to be small on a 9' 5wt rod. go with a BBSIII. That's what I have on a 9' 5wt and it does well.

Tervor,
I agree completely. I have a BBSII on a 7'6" 3 wt and it balances very well. I have a spare spool that I lined with 4wt. My 3wt is a Sage SLT. It's not a fast rod by any means but sometimes I like to use the 4wt line on it. The BBSII with the 4wt line does not leave much backing room. Of course, I'm not likely to ever see backing on that rod given what I'm fishing for and where I'm fishing when I use it. But, one never knows.

With a 9; 5wt, the BBSIII would probably balance a whole lot better. My son has an Orvis Mid Arbor III on his 8'6" 5wt and it balances very well.

Jeff

Worrgamesguy
09-11-2008, 02:47 PM
A balanced rod does what, create less strain on the user?

jeffnles1
09-11-2008, 02:57 PM
A balanced rod does what, create less strain on the user?

Trey,
Basically, that's it. I find if the reel is way too light, the rod feels tip heavy after a couple hours of fishing and my forearm and wrist in my casting side fatigue faster.

The way I cast (I hesitate to call it a style and if you've ever seen me cast, you would most likely agree), a little heavier reel (up to a point) feels a little better.

I have a Ross Rhythm 3 on my 9' 5wt rod and it feels great. My son has the Orvis Mid Arbor 3 on his 8'6" 5wt and it also casts well, almost effortless.

Just for grins, I put the Orvis BBSII on my 9' 5wt and it just didn't feel right.

I think a lot of it depends on your personal casting style. Bottom-line, you won't go wrong using a BBS III or a Mid Arbor III on a 9' 5wt rod.

Hope this is helpful.

Jeff

Worrgamesguy
09-11-2008, 07:29 PM
Thanks Jeff... I'll be fishing the Caney both days this weekend, I'm VERY happy about that! I bought my buddy a little gift (he has a rough life), and he can pay me back so that's $130 + $40 I have in cash, I'm getting there. Only a little over $100 until I can get my new setup.

Worrgamesguy
09-13-2008, 02:48 PM
Well, today REALLY made me want to get my new setup. I was having a ball with all the little rainbows and brookies, until fly fishing became too hazardous for 3 people in the boat. My grandpa did catch a 24" brown, he was hooked in the gill so we had to keep him, unfortunately.

Gerry Romer
09-13-2008, 03:52 PM
Sounds like a pretty good day! Hey - casting with 3 people in a drift boat that's designed just for that can be a little dicey at times... the guy rowing is always in the line of fire!

Gerry

Worrgamesguy
09-13-2008, 05:49 PM
Sounds like a pretty good day! Hey - casting with 3 people in a drift boat that's designed just for that can be a little dicey at times... the guy rowing is always in the line of fire!

Gerry

Thank goodness for trolling motors :rolleyes: It's a two person jon boat, and I sit on the little ledge in the very front when there are 3 people in the boat. When I stretch my legs, I can feel the temperature difference between the parts of the boat that are not touching the water, and those that are. I can feel it go up and down as the boat hits choppy sections of water. I'm gonna be fly fishing HH tomorrow, while my dad, grandpa, and good friend will be floating from the dam.

Anyone gonna be there?