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Worrgamesguy
10-21-2008, 10:14 PM
Back in August when I went fishing with Gerry and David on the Caney, I used Gerry's waders with the neoprene socks and a pair of wading boots. It was really comfortable but it leaked a little. Is that common? Also, what type of waders has the advantage over the other- boots attached or sock waders with wading boots? My dad brought up an interesting point- it would be much easier to kick off waders with the boot attached than it would be untying a boot and then trying to get the waders off, should you get in trouble...

Grumpy
10-22-2008, 07:56 AM
I prefer the neoprene booties over bootfoot, if you go bootfoot, get the ones with laceup boots, sometimes, it's hard to get a good fit with the boot style & you're fighting a loose boot & slick stream, not to mention, just plain uncomfortable if you do a lot of walking.

Grumpy

Milton
10-22-2008, 09:52 AM
I'm a fan of bootfoots myself, mainly just because they're so quick and easy to slip on and off. Another plus is that they keep your feet warmer.

If the day's going to involve a serious hike, I'll wear hiking boots, and carry my stockingfoots and lightweight wading boots in a daypack.

I had a pair of Orvis Silver Label bootfoots for five years, with the big clunky rubber boots, but they finally started to leak and couldn't be repaired. Now I've got a pair of the new bootfoots with the lighter, lace-up boots, and they felt very comfortable when I tried them on in the store. I'll be field-testing them this weekend.:smile:


-Milton

Milton
10-22-2008, 10:16 AM
In spite of what I said above, for your first pair of waders, I'd recommmend stockingfoots. There are situations - air travel and backpacking come to mind - where the bulk and weight of bootfoots is a disadvantage. I've got both, but if I were only going to have one pair, they'd be stockingfoots.

-Milton

golfballs03
10-22-2008, 11:08 AM
Stockingfoots. They're more versatile... I like to wet wade (conditions permitting) so I need a boot that isn't attached to the wader.

MtnMike
10-22-2008, 11:46 AM
I use 1 pair of boots to wet wade with a neoprene sock, also wear the same boots with my waist high wading pants, and on those rare occasions that I pull out the chest waders I'm still wearing the same pair of boot. 1 pair of boots used for 3 different wading options, can't beat that. Just my 2 cents.

Mike

Worrgamesguy
10-22-2008, 07:30 PM
It seems like the neoprene socks tend to leak, though. Not to mention the ability to kick off bootfoots when in trouble. I'm game for either, I just want to be 110% comfortable whenever I decide to fish this winter.

MBWCC
10-22-2008, 08:36 PM
First, no, stocking foot waders do not ordinarily leak nor should they. If they do, there is a problem. I had issues with seam leaks on the first two pair of stocking foot waders I purchased (same brand name and model), but it was a manufacturing issue, not an issue inherent in a stocking foot waders. My current waders maintain a bone dry interior.

Second, I will echo the comments above regarding the flexibility of stocking foot waders and boots. I, too, like to wet wade in the warmer months. The flexibiity of one pair of wading boots that can go with either neoprene booties (wet wading) or stocking foot waders (normal wading) is a great benefit.

Worrgamesguy
10-22-2008, 08:47 PM
Okay then... Can you make an honest recommendation for me? I want to buy a good pair, but I don't wanna dish out a lot of money, I want the best bang for my buck- like my fly rod setup seems to be.

Do all wading boots have the gravel guard you pull over the laces?

What are defining qualities of good waders?

I liked the setup Gerry lent me, I believe they were Simms of some sort and they weren't rubber, they almost had a "tarp" feel to them- they were extremely light, flexible, and comfortable. I think that type of material would be ideal, but I could be wrong.

bigpopper
10-22-2008, 09:32 PM
Worrgamesguy,
I have used both, stoking foot and boot foot. Boot foot air was borrowed and worked well, however, they were heavier than the stocking foot waders i've used, and i wouldnt want to hike around alot for miles up and down the waters. I bought stoking foot waders at a discount wearhouse this summer, went through 2 pairs! Both leaked like sives :eek: . I took them back! STAY AWAY FROM THE DISCOUNT WEARHOUSE! I'm gonna buy a new pair and boots this weekend or the next, it will be the stocking foot waders. Wherever you go to buy make sure you try it all on first. I know waders can get expensive but good ones usually range from $100 on up. Best of luck to ya, let us know what you get.

golfballs03
10-22-2008, 10:05 PM
I recommend Simms' Blackfoot waders. They aren't too expensive, but they really last.

For a boot I like Simms' Freestone boot. They really make a quality product.

Worrgamesguy
10-22-2008, 10:20 PM
I recommend Simms' Blackfoot waders. They aren't too expensive, but they really last.

For a boot I like Simms' Freestone boot. They really make a quality product.

How much would that run me?

Worrgamesguy
10-22-2008, 10:49 PM
How much would that run me?

I used my resources, that setup is doable. Is it honestly good? I want these for years to come, will they dry rot or anything?

ttas67
10-23-2008, 07:57 AM
Trey, waders are like any other fly fishing product. there are many different levels and you can spend anywhere from $50 to $700 for a pair. essentially, you want something that keeps you dry, breathes (lets moisture out), fits comfortably, and is durable.

let's break it down

all modern waders on the market today will keep you dry (until they leak) and breathe. breathability is can vary with different waders depending on material. More expensive waders claim better breathability due to using more high tech fabrics (like gore-tex). while they technically breathe better, will you notice a difference? probably not. I've owned the cheapest Simms and more expensive ones with gore-tex, and can't tell much of a difference.

The next issue is fit. This, for me, is the NUMBER ONE factor when looking for waders and boots. Like all clothing, you'll find that different brands fit differently. example: Orvis waders fit me nicely throughout the legs, but the stocking feet are always too long. I highly recommend trying on many different pairs and find one that fits comfortably.

The issue of durability is relative to many factors, and is therefore almost impossible to determine without actually owning them yourself and having something to compare them to. On one end of the spectrum, you may go fishing only once a month, walk from your car to a nice gravel bottom stream, not move around much, and hang your waders to dry when you get home. In this case your waders could last 10 years. On the other end, you may fish 4 times a week, climb boulders or slide down banks and leave your wet waders in the trunk for the night (will cause mildew, rot). In this case, they could only last a year.

As for boots, you want felt soles. There are extremely lightweight boots, which may be a little less durable, and heavier boots which will last indefinitely. Whatever you do, don't get a boot that's too tight. In fact, I wouldn't even get one that's slightly tight. make sure you can move your toes around a little in them. If you can't, your toes may start to cramp up after a couple of hours. A tight boot will also decrease circulation in your foot, which means on cold days, your feet will freeze.

Assuming you will fish a alot, 3 years is a good amount of time to expect out of your waders. I've owned the simms freestone waders and freestone boots. the waders lasted almost 3 years (and I didn't take good care of them) and the boots (though I wear a different pair now) look about as good as the day I bought them. If they fit you correctly, I say go for them. They're good quality at a reasonable price. If they leak or have problems in the first year, simms will fix them free. after that, they'll stick you with a bill. Sorry, I'm still a little sore about them charging me $80 to repair my current pair! they did a good job, though.

kytroutman
10-23-2008, 09:20 AM
ttas67 has made some very good points. Also remember, there are a few label brands for stores that are actually made by the larger companies (i.e. Orvis, Simms and Patagonia). Look at the design of the cheaper brands and compare to the more expensive. You will see the likeness in the designs. Also remember your warranties. Simms has a one year warranty but Patagonia has extended warranties. While these are more expensive, the warranty protection also helps. The one caveat I would recommend is a double reinforced knee and seat. Climbing and sliding over rocks puts extreme wear on a pair of waders and the double reinforcement will make the waders last longer. I would also recommend a pair of waders with the integrated rock guards to keep small pebbles and sand out of your boots. Nothing wears out the neoprene stockings like sand so don't forget to rinse them and the inside of your boots thoroughly. Last, it is extremely convenient to have a "convertible" pair of waders that are chest waders but can be rolled down to the waist in the warmer weather before wet wading can begin. Just my long two cents worth.

Worrgamesguy
10-23-2008, 10:25 AM
Trey, waders are like any other fly fishing product. there are many different levels and you can spend anywhere from $50 to $700 for a pair. essentially, you want something that keeps you dry, breathes (lets moisture out), fits comfortably, and is durable.

let's break it down

all modern waders on the market today will keep you dry (until they leak) and breathe. breathability is can vary with different waders depending on material. More expensive waders claim better breathability due to using more high tech fabrics (like gore-tex). while they technically breathe better, will you notice a difference? probably not. I've owned the cheapest Simms and more expensive ones with gore-tex, and can't tell much of a difference.

The next issue is fit. This, for me, is the NUMBER ONE factor when looking for waders and boots. Like all clothing, you'll find that different brands fit differently. example: Orvis waders fit me nicely throughout the legs, but the stocking feet are always too long. I highly recommend trying on many different pairs and find one that fits comfortably.

The issue of durability is relative to many factors, and is therefore almost impossible to determine without actually owning them yourself and having something to compare them to. On one end of the spectrum, you may go fishing only once a month, walk from your car to a nice gravel bottom stream, not move around much, and hang your waders to dry when you get home. In this case your waders could last 10 years. On the other end, you may fish 4 times a week, climb boulders or slide down banks and leave your wet waders in the trunk for the night (will cause mildew, rot). In this case, they could only last a year.

As for boots, you want felt soles. There are extremely lightweight boots, which may be a little less durable, and heavier boots which will last indefinitely. Whatever you do, don't get a boot that's too tight. In fact, I wouldn't even get one that's slightly tight. make sure you can move your toes around a little in them. If you can't, your toes may start to cramp up after a couple of hours. A tight boot will also decrease circulation in your foot, which means on cold days, your feet will freeze.

Assuming you will fish a alot, 3 years is a good amount of time to expect out of your waders. I've owned the simms freestone waders and freestone boots. the waders lasted almost 3 years (and I didn't take good care of them) and the boots (though I wear a different pair now) look about as good as the day I bought them. If they fit you correctly, I say go for them. They're good quality at a reasonable price. If they leak or have problems in the first year, simms will fix them free. after that, they'll stick you with a bill. Sorry, I'm still a little sore about them charging me $80 to repair my current pair! they did a good job, though.

Wow man what a post! I'm really confused as to which size would be ideal for my body type. I'm about 5'10"-5'11", a little under 200 pounds, and wear a size 10-11 shoe. What is the rule for buying boots?

ttas67 has made some very good points. Also remember, there are a few label brands for stores that are actually made by the larger companies (i.e. Orvis, Simms and Patagonia). Look at the design of the cheaper brands and compare to the more expensive. You will see the likeness in the designs. Also remember your warranties. Simms has a one year warranty but Patagonia has extended warranties. While these are more expensive, the warranty protection also helps. The one caveat I would recommend is a double reinforced knee and seat. Climbing and sliding over rocks puts extreme wear on a pair of waders and the double reinforcement will make the waders last longer. I would also recommend a pair of waders with the integrated rock guards to keep small pebbles and sand out of your boots. Nothing wears out the neoprene stockings like sand so don't forget to rinse them and the inside of your boots thoroughly. Last, it is extremely convenient to have a "convertible" pair of waders that are chest waders but can be rolled down to the waist in the warmer weather before wet wading can begin. Just my long two cents worth.

What do you recommend?

golfballs03
10-23-2008, 10:28 AM
The shoulder straps on the Simms wader connect together to form a belt so you can roll it down and wear around your waist.

The reinforced knee and seat is nice, but unless you are really rough on your waders or fish every other day with a lot of wear, i'm not sure it's worth the extra cost - that's just my experience. The gravel guards are also a nice accessory. I bought the wraps separately - it's more of an issue of comfort than wear for me.

BTW I'd like to know what other brand waders are made by Simms???????? That would be worth looking into

As for the size, I recommend you try them on before you buy...

Worrgamesguy
10-23-2008, 03:12 PM
Trying them on might be a problem, Bass Pro has a terrible selection, LRO is 4 hours away, maybe Cumberland Transit?

Golf, I assume you're talking about the Simms Blackfoot?

So, on upkeep it's best to hang them up to dry after being hosed off?

golfballs03
10-23-2008, 09:40 PM
Yeah, I have the freestone but i think it's been redesigned because mine are more like the blackfoot.

If you can't try them on check the size chart on Simms' website and go from there...

After you use them it's definitely best to let them air out.

BuckeyeRick
10-30-2008, 11:36 AM
I believe Orvis' website still has the discontinued Pro Guide2 waders - were $289, now $179. I have had a pair since Spring and ABSOLUTELY LOVE THEM. They have actual belt loops, so you can fold them down and make hip waders. Very comfortable (a little stiffer than other waders) and they seem to be well-made and tough. I have had other Orvis waders and their service has been great! The Silver Label2's are also on sale - from $189 to $149. If possible, go with the Pro Guides.

I have the older style of Korkers and they work great. Google Korkers Wetlands Wading Boots and you can find them - in the $40-50 range.

Worrgamesguy
10-31-2008, 07:56 PM
Well guys, I got Simms Freestone waders and Freestone boots. It cost me a little over $300 but I got birthday money today so I only paid like $230 out of pocket. They seem fantastic, can't wait to try them out tomorrow! What should I do to care for them when I get off the stream?

Gerry Romer
10-31-2008, 09:09 PM
Like Brett said, unless you plan on falling down a lot of mud banks and throwing them in the trunk of your car for a few days... maintenance is pretty simple. I got in this habit a couple years ago... I always stop by a car wash on my way home from the stream. For a couple bucks in quarters, I can lightly hose down my waders to remove any debris that didn't get washed off in the stream, and use a higher pressure wash on the felt soles of my boots to help remove any traces of didymo I might have dragged out of the stream. Then when I get home I hang the waders up to dry and leave my boots to thoroughly dry in the sun. That's about all you need to do.

If you do plan on sliding down mud banks and throwing them in your trunk for a few days, then I'd start saving up money for a backup pair.

Seriously, the Simms waders should have come with a basic care guide. I've got the same waders and I can't remember if the care instructions are printed on the backside of the internal pocket or if they were on a separate card in the box.

Good setup! I can see you getting into some of those choice channels on the Caney now!!

Gerry