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View Full Version : equipment update and upgrade?


flyguys
10-24-2008, 05:48 PM
Before buying too much new equipment, what is everyones opinion on moving down to a 6ft fly rod versus keeping on using a 8ft fly rod. In some of the areas I fished it seemed that a six footer would be easier to handle with the overhead areas and the backcast. Is there and advantage to a six footer when casting the light flies we used this last trip. Any input will be greatly appreciated! Thanks!!

Brian Griffing
10-24-2008, 06:10 PM
I like my 9 footer for the mountain streams. For every place I have a hard time finding room above and behind me, there are two places that I am glad I have the length to get the fly and line out over the water side-armed when hemmed into a tight spot. Also, the places where the backcast does open up, I like being able to cast from distance.

flyguys
10-24-2008, 06:47 PM
I'm afraid if I had a nine foot fly rod I would spend a lot of time tangled in the trees. The last time I was out I didn't catch anything in the trees!

Kytroutbum
10-24-2008, 07:00 PM
I own three trout rods, 2- 9 ft.s and 1 6ft. The 6 footer has dust on it. I like the length for mending etc. Just use a roll cast.

Also, Just ignore those suggestions for dropper rigs. Really an attempt by LRO to sell more flies. No wonder their business is doing better.(:>) Dug two sets with dropper flies, out of trees last August. I don't need two flies to tangle up- one is enough!

flyguys
10-24-2008, 07:18 PM
I don't think I will attempt a dropper fly. If I did I'm afraid I would be digging the dropper fly out of the back of my head or off the seat of my waders with the hook firmly in place!!:eek:

David Knapp
10-24-2008, 08:22 PM
I much prefer a longer rod when fishing the park. It takes a really small stream to make an 8' or 9' rod too large...stick with the length for the advantages it offers and learn to cast from different angles to compensate for the different scenarios you will face...

92Esquire
10-24-2008, 08:39 PM
I had an 8' 3wt. Sold it and got a 7' 6" 3wt. I can't tell you how many times I wish I had the 6" back. I recently placed an order for my first bamboo rod, and it will be a 7' 9" 4wt.

I normally fish a dry and dropper in the Smokies, and I'd prefer a rod at 8' or a bit over. But I certainly don't have the experience of a lot of guys here.

flyguys
10-24-2008, 09:10 PM
:redface: Thanks for the tips. Hey plateau angler, if a nine footer will cause me to catch fish like I see on your blog I'll run to the store right now and buy a dozen!!

Gypsy
10-25-2008, 05:21 AM
FG; I fished with a 7'6 and kept feeling as if I needed more, for mending, high sticking, bow & arrow casts, and of course dappling. I bought my 8'6 and I don't think I will be useing that 7'6 in the park anymore. As a matter of fact I am useing my 4wt 9' more in the park and small streams. I am no expert but I would not go shorter.
As far as casting, you can develope non-conventional styles in small water such as side arm to keep out of the trees. And when you do you can teach me:rolleyes:

flyguys
10-25-2008, 08:40 AM
gypsy, I already have an unconventional roll cast. Climb on rock, cast, slip off rock, ROLL into water!:eek:

tire guy
10-25-2008, 09:08 AM
I have 6' 2 wt rod and it is a lot of fun with mountain fish. It is as different as goimg from streamers to dry flies when ya go for a longer rod. With that said my go to rod is still 9', Buy what you can get away with and enjoy. Buy from Little River Outfitters and support this board.

Waterborn
10-25-2008, 09:44 AM
I like my 9ft for the tailwaters and originally an 8ft for the Park, but a 9footer has been in my hand more often than not because that extra foot helps out with highsticking in both the small and wider waters of the Smokies. You could also, if you were pressed and this its just for fun and a improvise and adapt technique like a bow and arrow cast - take your pole down in half to cast in in an tight water spot, that is if you couldn't "dap" (pretty much cane pole) your fly in a small pool...Years ago I fished Kanati Fork - its a tiny dribble of water on the NC side, There was this one area where the rhodo canopy was no more than 3-4feet high, breaking the rod down, crawling in on hands and knees was the only way to get a cast into a covered hole that has some of the most brilliant inked specs I've seen thus far...

bugg
10-25-2008, 12:05 PM
I'm with the others. I like the longer rods more often than not.

Luke Warmwater
10-25-2008, 12:05 PM
I can give an opinion on this, because I had to make pretty much the same decision a few years back.

I had a 7 foot rod rod that I used for a few years in the mountains. It worked very well and caught a lot of fish. Then I decided I just needed a new rod. I tried a friends 8' rod on Jakes Creek and found that I had more line control. But, what really sold me was when I let out about two feet of leader, stuck the rod under some overhanging rhododendron, followed the current for a foot or so and picked up a nice little bow. The extra foot gave me more control with the fly and a little more reach.

I called Paula and bought an 8'-6" 3 wt TFO and I use it in the mountains everytime I go back.

To sum it up. For me, there is more control in the rod than in the line.

www.southeasternfly.com (http://www.southeasternfly.com/)

old tom
10-25-2008, 01:27 PM
It would be easier to say "ditto" - but not as much fun.

Here's my suggestion, simply because it's what I did. I got the 3wt fever since I fish the Park the majority of the time. I went thru the same process you're going thru now and settled on the 8'6" TFO 3wt. No regrets whatsoever. It's definitely my go to rod for the Park. But after some frustrating trips to streams such as Kanati Fork, I started wishing I had a shorter rod. I ended up buying a low end used 7' 3wt real cheap off another message board. It definitely has its purpose in my quiver of rods.

In short, buy the longer rod now and it will serve you well 90% of the time. When you find yourself with a few extra dollars, then pick up the shorter rod.

lauxier
10-27-2008, 09:53 AM
i have a 6ft cane rod---built for the smokey's--i hate it --its hard to nymph fish with it--and is hades to cast--don't know advantage to short barrell--i'll take that back--david redington makes a short fiberglass rod,a 6ft 6" that is fun to cast--it would work good in mountain streams--and economical too.

Rog 1
10-27-2008, 12:22 PM
Looks like I am in the minority here....I love fishing the park with my smaller rods....long ago I became enamored with the idea of ultra light tackle....this led me to Orvis' 6'6" one ounce 2 Wt. rod....I have fished this rod in all the park's waters and have landed a 16" bow on the WPLP and a 14" brown on the LR....since my son has taken this rod for his own I now have a Diamondglas 3Wt in same length which I love to fish....as with all equipment the bottom line is personal preference....right now I am being tempted by Orvis' new line that has longer but lighter rods....but cannot justify the price right now.....I would suggest keeping an eye on eBay for a shorter rod and if you can find one for cheap then get it just to try....

jeffnles1
10-27-2008, 12:47 PM
I like my 7'6" 3wt. Once in a while, I wish it was longer but for the most part, it's a fun little rod to fish. Sometimes, a little length would be nice for longer casts on some of the warmwater streams I frequent and there are those times when another few inches would be good for high sticking and mending around currents, but even with my 9' 4wt, I still sometimes wish the rod was a couple inches longer. (no jokes OK>>>)

If I were to buy a rod just for the park, I'd probably go with an 8'6" or a 9'. But something in a 7'6" - 8' range would be a good all around small stream rod to have in your quiver.

Jeff

Troutman
10-27-2008, 01:03 PM
Looks like I am in the minority here....I love fishing the park with my smaller rods....

Nope, I love fishing the short rods also. High sticking heavy nymphs is usually the most productive way to fish the park and a longer rod is definitely better, but after many years of doing just that and wearing out my shoulder, I prefer just throwing dries with a short 7ft full flexing 3 or 4 wt and enjoy the casting rhythms and fight of a small fish on a little lightweight rod. I still use the 8-9ft rods for tailwaters, but when spring comes in the park and the Quill gordons are popping, my little lami fiberglass 7ft 3wt. is a hoot!

Lauxier, if you like Dave R. rods, you would love some of the other lami builds over on fiberglass flyrodders. I am gonna have another Lami honey built for me in the 7.5ft 3piece 4wt. for smallies. The 3 and 4 piece models are even more full flexing than the 2 piece blanks.

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l114/gltroutman/Trout08007.jpg

lauxier
10-27-2008, 07:15 PM
those yellow fiber-lami's seem perfect for mountain streams-own a 3wt and a 6wt 8ft that casts great--have a scott fiberglass that is real good---and of course there is the winston retro's which are too expensive to fool with.I wish fishing folks would look closer at fiberglass rods-i think we have been fast actioned to death--cane and fiberglass are old timey but make the casting part of fishing fun.

Rog 1
10-28-2008, 09:18 AM
I have a 30 year old Orvis Fullflex fiberglass rod....7 ft, 6wt...that I built....this was the last material Orvis used before they came out with their graphite rods.....I still fish with this rod on occasion and love the way it fishes....recently bought a 3 wt. Diamondglas that brings back the old ways.

flyguys
10-28-2008, 07:56 PM
it seems to mme that the only solution to my problem is to purchase several rods in different lengths, that way I would never be without the proper rod for the occasion at hand. Of course this went over like a pregnant pole vaulter when I mentioned this to my wife!! Maybe she would like some new fly fishing equipment?:rolleyes:

Bullwinkle
10-29-2008, 07:47 PM
IMHO, the best rod for in the park is the Superfine 7' for a 4wt.. with a CFO reel. I liked the new Superfine Wonderline best until I tried the Cortland Precision Platinum line.

pineman19
10-29-2008, 09:16 PM
IMHO, the best rod for in the park is the Superfine 7' for a 4wt.. with a CFO reel. I liked the new Superfine Wonderline best until I tried the Cortland Precision Platinum line.


Do you fish Mad River Bullwinkle? I am from Wapakoneta, Oh. Caught my first trout on the Mad around 35 yrs. ago.


Neal

jeffnles1
10-30-2008, 09:17 AM
it seems to mme that the only solution to my problem is to purchase several rods in different lengths, that way I would never be without the proper rod for the occasion at hand. Of course this went over like a pregnant pole vaulter when I mentioned this to my wife!! Maybe she would like some new fly fishing equipment?:rolleyes:

I like the way you think. Great idea, bad execution. What you need to do is buy several rods in different lengths and weights THEN tell your wife after you've mailed in the warranty cards.

See, you can always count on expert advice on the LRO forum.

Jeff

flyred06
10-30-2008, 02:49 PM
I have a 8'6" 5wt winston IM6 rod with a orvis cfo reel that I trully love and use every where from the mountains to the drift boat. I think it is now the wt model but you would never go wrong with the longer rod. If 9 ft is not what you want think about the 8'6" rods. I also have an 8' 4wt that is nice to. I have an 8' cane rod but out of them all I prefer the 8'6" winston. Just my 2cents.:biggrin:

Bullwinkle
11-03-2008, 09:28 AM
Do you fish Mad River Bullwinkle? I am from Wapakoneta, Oh. Caught my first trout on the Mad around 35 yrs. ago.


Neal


Yep.. I get out to the Mad once or twice a month