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Stonefly
01-03-2009, 08:51 PM
Has anyone tried the Thingamabobbers? How you like 'em? How much can the various sizes support, in terms of split shot, weighted flies? TIA

sb

Carolina Boy
01-03-2009, 09:12 PM
I actually have used them out of my kayak to fish dumbell eye weighted dragonfly patterns for big bass and bream. For that they work well. I am not a big fan of them for the river, but I don't fish indicators all that much as I prefer dropper setups, I bet the small ones would work pretty good though??

David Knapp
01-03-2009, 09:52 PM
I use them a lot and love them. They have become my go-to indicator for any situation where I'm fishing deeper than 3 feet or so. In shallow water I still mainly use a dry/dropper rig... The Thingamabobbers are basically indestructible and are very sensitive. I use the 1/2" and 3/4" mostly and the small 1/2" size will float a surprising amount of weight. I've heard that they are going to start offering these in some more neutral colors which would be great. They only downside is that they can slip a little on the leader but the positives definitely outweigh this potential problem. Just check they rig every few minutes which you should do anyway when nymphing and readjust as necessary. They aren't perfect in every situation but are a really good overall indicator that will get the job done...

MickinMS
01-03-2009, 09:56 PM
I went to the Spring River in Arkansas this morning and used them for the first time. Overall I liked them, especially the fact that they adjustable. I was using the small ones with BH sow bugs, scuds and zebra midges. In a couple of places I had to pinch on some soft weight. When I did I think I would have fared better with a large size. They are very sensitive and easy to put on. They did not seem to spook fish.

I will use them again.

drag line
01-03-2009, 09:58 PM
Steve, I have used these when I was fishing the Missouri in Montana
this June. We were using the next to larger size with 2 nymphs and 3 large split shot. The leader were 10# test 12 ' long with 3 to 4' of tippett and even with all that they were very easy to use and cast and I swear the guide could tell if a trout was even sniffing at the flys because of the way they would twich . I have not used them back home as I prefer yarn indicators but fishing from a drift boat I would use again.

Stonefly
01-03-2009, 10:01 PM
David --

Thanks for the input. I usually use a short piece of poly, but a couple of split shot can be too much weight. I also make some indicators with poly and an o-ring, which can hold up more weight but these things look like they'll do better than that.

Since casting weighted flies isn't great to begin with, I don't guess it's much worse with a thingamabobber on your leader?

sb

David Knapp
01-03-2009, 10:03 PM
David --

Thanks for the input. I usually use a short piece of poly, but a couple of split shot can be too much weight. I also make some indicators with poly and an o-ring, which can hold up more weight but these things look like they'll do better than that.

Since casting weighted flies isn't great to begin with, I don't guess it's much worse with a thingamabobber on your leader?

sb

Oh man, I forgot to mention, these things cast really well!!!

Stonefly
01-03-2009, 10:05 PM
Hey MickinMs -

How's the Spring these days? I used to fish it quite a bit when I lived in Memphis.

sb

ChemEAngler
01-03-2009, 10:52 PM
I like to take some tiny O-rings and cut them, slip one end through the hole, and then glue it back together. I find that it casts much more easily like this and it doesn't slip up and down the line on me.

When fishing my typical tailwater midge/nymph rigs, I find that the 1/2" size is all you need. However, if you plan to drop a large stonefly or a streamer off of one, I would go with the 3/4" size.

On my last fishing trip out west, my guide had me fishing streamers below balloons. We would cast out to a deep slow run and easily twitch the streamer back to the boat. It worked very well for the slightly lethargic big bows. Very rarely did it make it all the way back to boat before it was crushed. These would work well for that technique.

Travis

Stonefly
01-03-2009, 11:00 PM
Travis -

Do you then run your leader thru the o-ring?

sb


[quote=ChemEAngler;61360]I like to take some tiny O-rings and cut them, slip one end through the hole, and then glue it back together. I find that it casts much more easily like this and it doesn't slip up and down the line on me.

ChemEAngler
01-04-2009, 04:06 AM
Steve,

That is correct. The ring on the thingamabobber lends itself to slipping, but the rubber O-ring holds much more securely. Just loop your leader and slip it thru the ring and over the bobber, and then pull tight. Just like using your yarn indicator with a ring.

Travis

FLYMANBILL
01-04-2009, 06:45 AM
some use a tooth pick to prevent slippage though I do not know if it helps. pull lie thru the hole and hold in place by wrapping rround a couple of half hitches.

MickinMS
01-04-2009, 11:36 AM
Steve-

It was crowded yesterday. Couple of meat fishers kept crowding me all day. They caught a lot of fish (they were using shrimp) out of areas I was trying to work. Pissed me off! One of the guys had a 24+ inch fish on his stringer.

Fly fishing was tough yesterday, I caught eight browns and bows and probably 25 shiners. At the end of the day, in desperation, I switched to a fl chartreuse wooly bugger. I cast it across and downstream and WHAM! I thought I had a big trout and it turned out to be a 12 in smallmouth. My first smallmouth ever and it was a blast. That little dude was a fighter.

I prefer the Little Red, but flows have not worked with my schedule.

Fishermansfly
01-05-2009, 10:04 AM
Dental bands! Like the type used to align braces...Should be relatively cheap, and I know someone who used them. He said it worked perfectly. I'm not one for the this gadget, as David said there great if your fishing deep 3' or more. Otherwise you'll suffer slippage and spend more time fixing your indicator then actually fishing. The best indicators I've come across are the slip indicators. My go to indicators are Orvis's yarn indicators. There expensive and float terrible, but after you apply floatant you'll be good just about all day!

~Brett

James Buice
01-05-2009, 11:37 AM
I love 'em. The 1/2" works great and doesn't land with the "splat" you'd think something like that would. They'll float a VW Bug, which is great when you're fishing a tandem nymph rig with two or three BB shot.

J

troutslayer3393
01-05-2009, 05:43 PM
Are Thingamabobbers cheap

seagull
01-06-2009, 06:07 AM
Bobbers? "We don't need no stinkin bobbers."

UofMontanaAlum
01-06-2009, 09:01 AM
Are Thingamabobbers cheap

I wouldn't say cheap (like $5 for 3 or 4) but they are reuseable so you'd only have to buy them once. I thought they were pricey at first, compared to yarn, until I used them. Worth every penny.

Gerry Romer
01-06-2009, 03:54 PM
If you have trouble finding dental bands or o-rings that are small enough, look for those cheapy eye-glass repair kits that they sell at the counter at drug convenience stores... the little plastic tubes that contain extra screws and nose pads. Some of those come with tiny, little, black o-rings to put in the frames to increase tension at the temple. They're smaller than any o-rings I've found at Lowes. Those kits are usually cheaper than a box of o-rings too.

Yeah, I use 'em. With my eyesight these days I'll take every advantage I can get.