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Wilson10
02-24-2009, 02:33 PM
With Spring right around the corner I've began to ponder ways to help myself become a more efficient fly fisherman. Below are a couple things I want to do better. Please feel free to offer advice and also to share some things you want to do better. Or if you would like, you can simply offer advice for efficient tailwater fishing.

1. Become a better dry fly fisherman
2. Learn to locate better fish more consistently


These are just a couple off the top of my head. I'll be sure to add more later.

Thanks,

ChemEAngler
02-24-2009, 03:29 PM
Just my two cents for fishing the tailwaters around here is to become very proficient using midges. Whether it be dries, larva, or pupae. Learning how to properly fish the correct midge imitation can mean the difference between a skunking and a fantastic day.

I spent last year working on the midge techniques, and it paid off. This year I am planning on working on my dry technique just like you. I think the first thing to concentrate on is mending and getting a perfect drift. IMO that is what makes the difference when fishing dries.

flyred06
02-24-2009, 03:47 PM
fishing nymphs without indicators and mending. Also, slowing down. I tend to get myself worked up to quickly thinking more is better versus planning my next cast and letting my drift go all the way through without interupting it.

psnapp
02-24-2009, 09:11 PM
I, too, would add that fishing midges (including black fly patterns) in appropriate sizes and patterns with a drag-free drift is a key to successful tailwater fishing. Midges and crustaceans are tailwater staples, and the more proficient you become in presenting a "reasonable" pattern in a "reasonable" size, the more success you will have.

I would like to suggest another ingredient to the tailwater strategy mix -- streamers. Having a variety of sculpin, shad and general-purpose (eg buggers, zonkers, Barr and Gallup concoctions, etc) patterns in your arsenal and focusing on the lesser-fished areas can mean the difference in a so-so day and a super day. I (not to boast) have had some very good days on E Tenn tailwaters fishing streamers in not-so-popular areas when the overall fishing around me was lackluster.

Phil

ajh10567
02-25-2009, 12:29 AM
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?

Wilson10
02-25-2009, 12:52 AM
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?


Not exactly what you were talking about but I was just reading about a 3 fly system of which have 3 different life cycles. Anyone used this before? Seemed interesting, but guaranteed to tangle on me. I have hard enough time with a 2 fly system.

ajh10567
02-25-2009, 01:41 AM
Yeah sorry it was a little confusing, but i basically meant that. Just fishing the larvae and the pupae stages together.

ajh10567
02-25-2009, 01:45 AM
Sorry, to clarify I was just wondering how effective that method of fishing could be? My goal for this year is to really understand how to effectively fish midges so thats why I am asking this question.

92Esquire
02-25-2009, 06:22 AM
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?

Not quite the same, but I've spent some time fishing a weighted Zebra midge below a soft hackle before. Similar idea. I still picked up all of my fish on the Zebra, for what it is worth.

ChemEAngler
02-25-2009, 12:20 PM
A common rig I use on the Clinch is to fish a #20 brassie with a #20 or 22 zebra midge about 12 inches below the brassie. A brassie does a very good job imitating midge pupae and the zebra imitates the larva. This rig has been very effective when casting to rising trout.

If I am casting to rising trout I will set my indicator so that the brassie is about 12" below the surface. If I am blind casting, I set my indicator so that my zebra midge is bouncing on the bottom.

highpockets
02-26-2009, 04:08 PM
I second the streamers.

Situation: You fished the micro-midge, Copper John, Prince, EHC until your arms are falling off. You've caught some fish but nothing that knocked your hat in the creek.

Tie on a Bright Wooly, or Olive with some flash, or one of my favorites a Grey Ghost. Cast to the areas (as mentioned before) that are ignored for the most part. Strip the fly aggressively with occasional long pauses. I have seen browns travel great distances (that make your heart skip a beat) to come get one of these offerings!

Hint: I always use a fairly heavy streamer. Seems I get strikes when the streamer is settling toward the bottom on the pauses.

Wilson10
03-03-2009, 01:08 PM
I've had quite a few days where my wolly buggers have saved the day, but need to learn to use them better.

Add - Become more effective with streamers to my '09 to do list :biggrin:

waterwolf
03-04-2009, 01:51 PM
1. Become a better dry fly fisherman

Thanks,

Just my .02, but scrap that if you want to be more efficient fishing tailwaters. I guess it depends on what you deem efficient. If it is putting fish to hand in numbers, quickly, then dries on our tailwaters are not really the way to go.

If you want to become lethal learn how to effectively present midges and other small nymphs. Learn the section you fish like the back of your hand and know every deep pocket, crease, slot, chute, whatever. Maximize your time on the river by putting the right fly, at the right depth, in the right places. And by all means keep it simple on the flies, when you wake up and know you only need 2 different nymphs to go to the river and be successful, a tuft of yarn, and a spool of tippet. Then you are there IMO.

Wilson10
03-04-2009, 02:39 PM
Just my .02, but scrap that if you want to be more efficient fishing tailwaters. I guess it depends on what you deem efficient. If it is putting fish to hand in numbers, quickly, then dries on our tailwaters are not really the way to go.

If you want to become lethal learn how to effectively present midges and other small nymphs. Learn the section you fish like the back of your hand and know every deep pocket, crease, slot, chute, whatever. Maximize your time on the river by putting the right fly, at the right depth, in the right places. And by all means keep it simple on the flies, when you wake up and know you only need 2 different nymphs to go to the river and be successful, a tuft of yarn, and a spool of tippet. Then you are there IMO.


Great advice! and I totally agree. I would like to become Lethal with midges and small nymphs. Thanks!

monktrout
03-04-2009, 06:28 PM
Is it just me or are we fishing midges deeper than we were ten years ago? I used to fish midges about 12-18" below the yarn. Seems like more and more anglers are routinely putting midge patterns on the bottom. Possibly the popular zebra patterns are more larva and less pupa. Are fish, rising to midges on top, sulking back down three feet? Any ideas?

Worrgamesguy
03-04-2009, 10:01 PM
I couldn't tell you. I used to think that when a trout completely cleared the water a bigger fish was chasing it. So when I'd see a nice 16-18" brown or rainbow shoot 3 feet in the air I would think "Holy, that must be a BIG fish chasing that!" Now I know better. All I know is physics applied to fishing. They're gonna sit on the bottom and relax and let the food come to them.

ChemEAngler
03-04-2009, 10:24 PM
Is it just me or are we fishing midges deeper than we were ten years ago? I used to fish midges about 12-18" below the yarn. Seems like more and more anglers are routinely putting midge patterns on the bottom. Possibly the popular zebra patterns are more larva and less pupa. Are fish, rising to midges on top, sulking back down three feet? Any ideas?

Monk,
I don't really know what they are doing. However, I have had some really good luck, especially on the SoHo, fishing a midge about 12" deep and casting to rising fish. I haven't had this be as successful on the Clinch though. Most of the time though I keep my midge larva on bottom.

waterwolf
03-05-2009, 12:13 AM
Is it just me or are we fishing midges deeper than we were ten years ago? I used to fish midges about 12-18" below the yarn. Seems like more and more anglers are routinely putting midge patterns on the bottom. Possibly the popular zebra patterns are more larva and less pupa. Are fish, rising to midges on top, sulking back down three feet? Any ideas?
I know I do, I fish an vg of 3-4 feet deep with midges. Tungsten beads made it super easy, and it was always easy in a river like the clinch which is super slow. I don't worry too much about pupa versus larvae, they eat them all on the same day. I also usually don't adjust my indicator once I tie it on, now that may be from haunting the clinch for 20 years or more and knowing exactly where my fly needs to be and how deep is deep enough to not have to constantly adjust.

No question the most inefficient way to fish the clinch is chasing the fish eating midges in the film or just under the surface. Usually dinks, and usually frustrating or slower then going deep in my experience.

monktrout
03-05-2009, 04:55 PM
Thanks guys for your ideas. Monk

3wt
03-05-2009, 05:09 PM
This is a good system but the larva should be deeper than the pupae. The pupae is rising to the surface but the larva is still living on the bottom. Sorry didn't realize how long ago that question was