PDA

View Full Version : Little River and surrounding NE TN camping


Worrgamesguy
04-05-2009, 11:26 PM
Well, long story short- I can't go to prom and my girlfriend wants to go camping instead. We would be leaving at around noon on 4/17 from Smyrna and returning late Sunday. I want to have as much fun as possible, obviously.

What would you do? I'd like to camp somewhere by the Little River, and fish there when we wake up and right before nightfall, but what should the highlight waters be? SoHo? Holston? Clinch?

Let's hear a perfect weekend trip!

mtnman2888
04-06-2009, 09:38 AM
What would I do? I'd marry her if she wants to go camping instead of prom!

David Knapp
04-06-2009, 10:35 AM
Camp at Elkmont in the Park and fish Little River, Middle Prong, or other park streams. Bring plenty of dry flies...:cool:

Carolina Boy
04-06-2009, 11:16 AM
Count yourself lucky my friend. I would camp at Elkmont and fish all that area hard, it is always a treat to fish there, when are you coming, your early and late plan might need adjusting if you are coming soon, afternoons have been best lately, plus why would ya leave the park and drive to a tailwater? The SoHo and Clinch are a good drive from up in the park, so the Holston would be closest, and from what I have seen on this board the cast netters are out? You gotta be kidding me!

Worrgamesguy
04-06-2009, 02:53 PM
What would I do? I'd marry her if she wants to go camping instead of prom!

Well I got in trouble so she didn't really have a choice, but she already has a ring on her finger ;)

Camp at Elkmont in the Park and fish Little River, Middle Prong, or other park streams. Bring plenty of dry flies...:cool:

That sounds good to me, how much is it to rent a camping spot? Vehicle accessible? How far from the campground to any of these streams? By vehicle or foot? Also what dries :rolleyes:

Count yourself lucky my friend. I would camp at Elkmont and fish all that area hard, it is always a treat to fish there, when are you coming, your early and late plan might need adjusting if you are coming soon, afternoons have been best lately, plus why would ya leave the park and drive to a tailwater? The SoHo and Clinch are a good drive from up in the park, so the Holston would be closest, and from what I have seen on this board the cast netters are out? You gotta be kidding me!

I'll be coming on Friday the 17th, and leave Sunday the 19th. I'll probably be able to make it to NE TN by about 4:00, so there is probably no time to fish on Friday. It doesn't matter where any of these rivers are, I'd just like to hook into a monster brown, but chances are if I can't do it on the Caney I can't do it anywhere else.

The Principal
04-06-2009, 04:53 PM
It costs $20 bucks a night to camp. Little River runs through the middle of the camp ground.
Flies - I usually use Para Adams, Caddis, drys and Hairs ear, prince and tellico nymphs
bead head phesant tail.

Worrgamesguy
04-06-2009, 06:55 PM
Is there a site where I can view the campground and reserve a spot? Or will I not have a problem?

Also, when getting ready to fish, how should I do it? Walk upstream, drive to another area, or what? I have no clue what any of this looks like, and can't imagine it.

buckeyetrouter
04-06-2009, 07:08 PM
if you are computer savy.....
http://www.recreation.gov/campgroundMap.do?page=map&contractCode=NRSO&parkId=70968&camparea=MAIN&mapSwitch=Y

this shows map and availability.....

if you go upstream from campgrounds past the bridge you will come to good water and the further you hike the better your chance for a brookie...this is walkable. I've seen posts here of people who caught them right there in the campgrounds, I've not been that fortunate. You can also walk downstream to the area behind the rangers qtrs and that is a nice stretch.....and so many other spots are just a short drive from the campgrounds.....enjoy your time...

God Bless & Good Fishing
Bob

Stonefly
04-06-2009, 08:44 PM
Another choice is Tellico/North River/Bald River. North River campground makes a decent base, and you can sleep to the sound of the water, wake up and fish.

sb

Worrgamesguy
04-06-2009, 11:05 PM
if you are computer savy.....
http://www.recreation.gov/campgroundMap.do?page=map&contractCode=NRSO&parkId=70968&camparea=MAIN&mapSwitch=Y

this shows map and availability.....

if you go upstream from campgrounds past the bridge you will come to good water and the further you hike the better your chance for a brookie...this is walkable. I've seen posts here of people who caught them right there in the campgrounds, I've not been that fortunate. You can also walk downstream to the area behind the rangers qtrs and that is a nice stretch.....and so many other spots are just a short drive from the campgrounds.....enjoy your time...

God Bless & Good Fishing
Bob

I like the looks of that a lot. If that map is geographically correct, where would you want to make camp? I think the little island below the bridge would be pretty sweet. Also, I don't like how it is walk up until a certain date, I wish I could secure a campsite so I don't get hosed.

Another choice is Tellico/North River/Bald River. North River campground makes a decent base, and you can sleep to the sound of the water, wake up and fish.

sb

I'm liking the looks of Elkmont, this is my first time and I'm quite timid.

Troutman
04-06-2009, 11:33 PM
You will probably have a hard time finding any spots directly on the river. Most get reserved. There are lots of other great sites though.Its a big campground. They don't usually open the entire campground this time of year either. Remember that there is no electricity or showers, only bathrooms with cold water. Many of the bathroom buildings are kept locked.They don't have enough employees working to keep all the sites open and maintained. You will need to bring a campstove to heat water.
The Sevier co. schools will be on spring break that week. I will be up there camping next week with the family also. Fishing is usually good even in the campground although it gets fished heavily by campers. Last year there were a bunch of kids in wetsuits constantly floating the river on tubes in the campground area making it difficult to fish at times.

Worrgamesguy
04-07-2009, 12:16 AM
You will probably have a hard time finding any spots directly on the river. Most get reserved. There are lots of other great sites though.Its a big campground. They don't usually open the entire campground this time of year either. Remember that there is no electricity or showers, only bathrooms with cold water. Many of the bathroom buildings are kept locked.They don't have enough employees working to keep all the sites open and maintained. You will need to bring a campstove to heat water.
The Sevier co. schools will be on spring break that week. I will be up there camping next week with the family also. Fishing is usually good even in the campground although it gets fished heavily by campers. Last year there were a bunch of kids in wetsuits constantly floating the river on tubes in the campground area making it difficult to fish at times.

They aren't available for reservations until like mid May. I just want to catch my first GSMNP trout and do it safely, the two goals of this trip.

Troutman
04-07-2009, 06:37 AM
Thats right I forgot the reservations start later. It is first come first served. There should be plenty of sites to choose from, maybe not directly on the river as those always get picked first. Make sure that you don't come in by way of Sevierville and Pigeon forge. The traffic can get heavy on Friday afternoons. Drive in through Maryville, Townsend and across to Elkmont.

Carolina Boy
04-07-2009, 09:56 AM
Man I am not sure when they open the section with G and H in it, but I really like fishing the loop there, You can walk down between site H001 and G 14 hop in and fish around to the bridge. If that section is closed walk in there and fish proabaly won't be busy with other people especially if that section is closed. if that section is open try and stay in G009-G014 or H-001 or H-003 they are on the water and pretty !

PeteCz
04-07-2009, 11:27 AM
I just want to catch my first GSMNP trout and do it safely, the two goals of this trip.

Those are two good goals, but in general Elkmont is one of the easier streams to fish, so as long as you are reasonably careful, you should be fine. If you look at the Banner Picture on the Fishing Report that will give you a good idea of what most of the LR above Elkmont looks like (I'm not sure if it is or it isn't but it looks very similar to LR).

To increase you chances to catch a fish, I would hike about 15 minutes or more up the LR Trail above Elkmont (preferable 40 mins or more). The farther up the stream you go, the more gullible the fish are. These aren't stockers, so they get spooked easily, but as long as you don't scare'm and you are getting decent drifts with a sz 14 or 16 grayish fly (gray in the early spring - yellow later on) or a BHPT (or BH Tellico), you should catch some fish (maybe even some Browns).

Afternoons and Evenings will be the best times to fish in mid April.

Worrgamesguy
04-07-2009, 02:48 PM
Thats right I forgot the reservations start later. It is first come first served. There should be plenty of sites to choose from, maybe not directly on the river as those always get picked first. Make sure that you don't come in by way of Sevierville and Pigeon forge. The traffic can get heavy on Friday afternoons. Drive in through Maryville, Townsend and across to Elkmont.

I've gotta stop by LRO, so I'll be taking that gosh awful windy 15 mile road away from Gatlinburg and Piegon Forge. I don't know the alternative route though, I'd have to see it highlighted on a map.

Man I am not sure when they open the section with G and H in it, but I really like fishing the loop there, You can walk down between site H001 and G 14 hop in and fish around to the bridge. If that section is closed walk in there and fish proabaly won't be busy with other people especially if that section is closed. if that section is open try and stay in G009-G014 or H-001 or H-003 they are on the water and pretty !

Thanks for the advice. I was hoping to trade my backup paintball gun for an Orvis Trout Bum 6'6" 3 WT + $100ish on a paintball forum, but the kid's mom threw away the rod sock and tube so I turned it down. I'm worried about using my 9' 5 WT TFO up there, seems like it would cause a lot of trouble.

Those are two good goals, but in general Elkmont is one of the easier streams to fish, so as long as you are reasonably careful, you should be fine. If you look at the Banner Picture on the Fishing Report that will give you a good idea of what most of the LR above Elkmont looks like (I'm not sure if it is or it isn't but it looks very similar to LR).

To increase you chances to catch a fish, I would hike about 15 minutes or more up the LR Trail above Elkmont (preferable 40 mins or more). The farther up the stream you go, the more gullible the fish are. These aren't stockers, so they get spooked easily, but as long as you don't scare'm and you are getting decent drifts with a sz 14 or 16 grayish fly (gray in the early spring - yellow later on) or a BHPT (or BH Tellico), you should catch some fish (maybe even some Browns).

Afternoons and Evenings will be the best times to fish in mid April.

I'd like to find a nice stream that wouldn't be technical like some of the rapids I see, with a few pockets of still deep water. Does the trail follow the river at all times, or will I have to bushwhack my way back to the stream? Most of my flies are tailwater based- midges, BHPT, Hares Ear, etc. but I'd think they're too large, but then again you say sz. 14 to 16. I'd love to catch a brookie but I've set my standards low, just one fish.

PeteCz
04-07-2009, 04:07 PM
If you have BHPTs and HEs in 14s and/or 16s (or even 18s) you should be good for below surface flies. Do you have any dries in the 14 or 16 size range? You could use EHC, Parachute Adams, Stimis or numerous others. The important thing is to get a good drift.

The trail follows very closely to the stream. In fact, one of the hardest problems you will find is to keep hiking when the water looks so tempting as you hike...There are a few areas that the trail is away from the stream, but even then its still fairly close, and at the same elevation.

There is a bit of a straighter drive to Metcalf Bottoms (on the way to Elkmont from Townsend) that bypasses some of the curves). Here is a link from Google Maps: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=from:+Townsend+tn+to:elkmont+tn&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=29.081881,56.601563&ie=UTF8&ll=35.690206,-83.679256&spn=0.058138,0.11055&z=13

Mountain fishing is much less technical than tailwater fishing. You will be high-sticking more than anything else. You'll flip your fly into a fishy looking spot and let the fly drift a few feet, as the currents will allow and then pull it and flip it into another spot (or the same spot again). The key is to cover a good amount of water. Don't spend too much time in anyone spot. If you can't get a fish interested after a few cast, you have probably put the fish down or the spot is devoid of fish, etc. Stay low and try not to scare the fish....

If you've fished with David K and Gerry, you'll catch some fish...Don't sell yourself short...fish aren't smart...they're just spooky...and sometimes picky...
:smile:

Worrgamesguy
04-07-2009, 05:09 PM
If you have BHPTs and HEs in 14s and/or 16s (or even 18s) you should be good for below surface flies. Do you have any dries in the 14 or 16 size range? You could use EHC, Parachute Adams, Stimis or numerous others. The important thing is to get a good drift.

The trail follows very closely to the stream. In fact, one of the hardest problems you will find is to keep hiking when the water looks so tempting as you hike...There are a few areas that the trail is away from the stream, but even then its still fairly close, and at the same elevation.

There is a bit of a straighter drive to Metcalf Bottoms (on the way to Elkmont from Townsend) that bypasses some of the curves). Here is a link from Google Maps: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=from:+Townsend+tn+to:elkmont+tn&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=29.081881,56.601563&ie=UTF8&ll=35.690206,-83.679256&spn=0.058138,0.11055&z=13

Mountain fishing is much less technical than tailwater fishing. You will be high-sticking more than anything else. You'll flip your fly into a fishy looking spot and let the fly drift a few feet, as the currents will allow and then pull it and flip it into another spot (or the same spot again). The key is to cover a good amount of water. Don't spend too much time in anyone spot. If you can't get a fish interested after a few cast, you have probably put the fish down or the spot is devoid of fish, etc. Stay low and try not to scare the fish....

If you've fished with David K and Gerry, you'll catch some fish...Don't sell yourself short...fish aren't smart...they're just spooky...and sometimes picky...
:smile:

Most of my dries are EHCs in 14-16, I have a few others such as BWOs (not sure about the specifics). How will my 9' 5WT fare with high sticking and all that? How do I know when I get a hit with a nymph? What sized leader and tippet should be used?

What should I wear, I don't think chest waders sound like the best idea? Should I just wear my wader boots? Jeans? Olive colored longsleeve?

PeteCz
04-07-2009, 05:48 PM
The EHC and BWOs will probably work. I would stick with gray to olive in the EHC, if you have them. If you make it to LRO you might want to pick up a few #14 or #16 Gray Parachute Adams.

Actually your 9' 5wt should be great for LR and high-sticking. It will allow you to keep most, if not all of your line off of the water. If you went to a smaller stream you might want something smaller, but for the Elkmont area your setup should be fine. I would use a 9' leader that has a 5x tippet section. Some people prefer smaller, but its mostly to help eliminate drag. The fish can't tell the microscopic difference in tippet sizes. Either they see it or they don't, and we've shared some articles on the forum that argue the point both ways.

Neoprene chest waders would be overkill. If they are breathable or lighter weight waders, depending on the brand, you should be able to unclip the shoulder straps and tuck the upper part under a wading belt and use them like waist-high waders. If the weather is nice, I would wet-wade. Don't wear jeans, they get very heavy and would be tough to dry at the campsite. The water temp should be 55 or higher so you could probably wear shorts, heavy socks and your wading boots. I've wet waded in less than 45 degree water in Colorado with no problems (other than mental damage, but that's another story...).

And yes, wear an olive colored or camo shirt, if you have one. Remember, you want to be ninja sneaky as someone on here once said...if they don't see you, or feel you (from clomping around in the stream too clumsily) they won't spook and hide.

It will take different tactics fishing in the mtns. When you are fishing, try to cast to the edges of things. Like the edge of a riffle or the edge of a rock or right above a ledge. There are tons of fish in the streams, you just need to pickout where they can hold with the least amount of effort, while waiting for their next meal...trying to catch fish in long slow pools is a recipe to get skunked in the mountains...unless you like catching Smoky Mtn Cutthroats (shiners)...fish where the water is moving. There's lots of articles on the web about small stream fishing. Google up some and you will arm yourself with some good tactics.

Brian Griffing
04-07-2009, 07:13 PM
Worrgamesguy,
agree with PeteCz. I have a TFO 9' 5 wt and it works great there.

milligan trout degree
04-07-2009, 08:00 PM
one more thing to remember if you're worried about being able to catch fish. mountain fish don't seem to be any more skiddish than most of the fish on the s. holston. maybe more so than some dumb stockers, but those wild fish are a heck of a lot more aggressive. As long as it warm out and the water is warm, take a bushy dry fly like a 14 or 16 ehc or stimulator or para adams, or anything really, and drop a ptail off the back or copper john, or pink weenie or green weenie and you'll be catching fish assuming you take reasonable precautions to not spook them first. hookups are tougher than on tailwaters because a lot of fish just slap at the fly and they are small and quick, but you'll get plenty of hits.

Worrgamesguy
04-07-2009, 11:04 PM
The EHC and BWOs will probably work. I would stick with gray to olive in the EHC, if you have them. If you make it to LRO you might want to pick up a few #14 or #16 Gray Parachute Adams.

Actually your 9' 5wt should be great for LR and high-sticking. It will allow you to keep most, if not all of your line off of the water. If you went to a smaller stream you might want something smaller, but for the Elkmont area your setup should be fine. I would use a 9' leader that has a 5x tippet section. Some people prefer smaller, but its mostly to help eliminate drag. The fish can't tell the microscopic difference in tippet sizes. Either they see it or they don't, and we've shared some articles on the forum that argue the point both ways.

Neoprene chest waders would be overkill. If they are breathable or lighter weight waders, depending on the brand, you should be able to unclip the shoulder straps and tuck the upper part under a wading belt and use them like waist-high waders. If the weather is nice, I would wet-wade. Don't wear jeans, they get very heavy and would be tough to dry at the campsite. The water temp should be 55 or higher so you could probably wear shorts, heavy socks and your wading boots. I've wet waded in less than 45 degree water in Colorado with no problems (other than mental damage, but that's another story...).

And yes, wear an olive colored or camo shirt, if you have one. Remember, you want to be ninja sneaky as someone on here once said...if they don't see you, or feel you (from clomping around in the stream too clumsily) they won't spook and hide.

It will take different tactics fishing in the mtns. When you are fishing, try to cast to the edges of things. Like the edge of a riffle or the edge of a rock or right above a ledge. There are tons of fish in the streams, you just need to pickout where they can hold with the least amount of effort, while waiting for their next meal...trying to catch fish in long slow pools is a recipe to get skunked in the mountains...unless you like catching Smoky Mtn Cutthroats (shiners)...fish where the water is moving. There's lots of articles on the web about small stream fishing. Google up some and you will arm yourself with some good tactics.

Why have I not fished with you yet? <3 Thanks for all the help! :biggrin:

I'm getting ready to get a paper pad and a pen to write down all these fly suggestions as well as tippet and all that fun stuff. I'm REALLY excited about this, I miss West Virginia streams and that picture looked a lot like the one I fish in West Virginia, except never with a fly rod. I think I should be okay as far as stealth, but my casts are pretty lacking.

I have one question about fishing riffles and what not- I know there are a lot of areas of backspin, where the fly will go under, how do I know when I get a hit? Will I know, or does it have to do with feel? I should be holding the line and most of the leader off the water, from what I gather, correct?

one more thing to remember if you're worried about being able to catch fish. mountain fish don't seem to be any more skiddish than most of the fish on the s. holston. maybe more so than some dumb stockers, but those wild fish are a heck of a lot more aggressive. As long as it warm out and the water is warm, take a bushy dry fly like a 14 or 16 ehc or stimulator or para adams, or anything really, and drop a ptail off the back or copper john, or pink weenie or green weenie and you'll be catching fish assuming you take reasonable precautions to not spook them first. hookups are tougher than on tailwaters because a lot of fish just slap at the fly and they are small and quick, but you'll get plenty of hits.

I'm buying a new pair of polarized sunglasses specifically for this trip. I have a feeling I'll get nothing but slaps :frown:

milligan trout degree
04-07-2009, 11:52 PM
polarized glasses help a lot. your fly may get pulled under from time to time, but you can frogs fanny it up and be good again. if it goes under, set the hook. always remember no matter where you're fishing, "hook-sets are free" if you think its a fish, hook it. can't hurt. there are a lot of runs and pools however in those freestone creeks, and having your fly pulled under doesn't happen as often as you may think. i think most people would agree that under good circumstances, enticing fish to eat in the mountains is easier than on most tailwaters. of course there are those rare days on tailwaters where it seems you can't go wrong. I'll be camping elkmont sometime in mid-may when i get back home from college. prob stay a couple nights and fish little river above the campground, below the campground, and i'll fish jacobs creek. maybe fish camp prong if we get to hiking a bit.

Worrgamesguy
04-08-2009, 09:32 AM
polarized glasses help a lot. your fly may get pulled under from time to time, but you can frogs fanny it up and be good again. if it goes under, set the hook. always remember no matter where you're fishing, "hook-sets are free" if you think its a fish, hook it. can't hurt. there are a lot of runs and pools however in those freestone creeks, and having your fly pulled under doesn't happen as often as you may think. i think most people would agree that under good circumstances, enticing fish to eat in the mountains is easier than on most tailwaters. of course there are those rare days on tailwaters where it seems you can't go wrong. I'll be camping elkmont sometime in mid-may when i get back home from college. prob stay a couple nights and fish little river above the campground, below the campground, and i'll fish jacobs creek. maybe fish camp prong if we get to hiking a bit.

I hope the style I want gets in before I leave on the trip, I want Costa Del Mar Blackfins. And frogs fanny?

PeteCz
04-08-2009, 11:14 AM
...is a dry powder that you put on your fly to dry it off after it gets soaked. You can find some at LRO. It has a brush applicator and all you do is take the brush and work the powder in to fly. The more you work it in, the better. Then just cast it again.

When you set the hook, don't over do it. I think 75% of the time I get a fly caught in a branch its because I yank the fly too hard and send it flying into an overhead branch...

To answer one of your other questions, yes, you should try and keep as much line off the water, as possible, to minimize drag. Obviously there is a trade-off here. You need to stay as low as possible, while keeping as much line off the water.

Troutman
04-08-2009, 12:56 PM
Your getting a lot of good free advice here. There are some places and situations where you will need to throw some longer cast to rising fish. I'm talking about 20-30 ft + the leader. In this picture of my son a couple of years ago he was 14 at the time and we were fishing during spring break. Notice the long flat run in the picture? Trout were rising all in here, but if you got to within 20 ft of them , they would shut down. Be sure when you walk into the river , you observe the water for a few minutes before casting.
working the back of the pool moving upstream, he picked up about 10-12 fish casting 3/4 upstream and across taking a few steps upstream and doing it again. Good luck.

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l114/gltroutman/springbreakcamping2007008.jpg

Worrgamesguy
04-08-2009, 03:47 PM
...is a dry powder that you put on your fly to dry it off after it gets soaked. You can find some at LRO. It has a brush applicator and all you do is take the brush and work the powder in to fly. The more you work it in, the better. Then just cast it again.

When you set the hook, don't over do it. I think 75% of the time I get a fly caught in a branch its because I yank the fly too hard and send it flying into an overhead branch...

To answer one of your other questions, yes, you should try and keep as much line off the water, as possible, to minimize drag. Obviously there is a trade-off here. You need to stay as low as possible, while keeping as much line off the water.

Ah, I thought it was some kind of technique. Should I not use gel floatant? Thanks for that advice, I'll take that to heart.

Your getting a lot of good free advice here. There are some places and situations where you will need to throw some longer cast to rising fish. I'm talking about 20-30 ft + the leader. In this picture of my son a couple of years ago he was 14 at the time and we were fishing during spring break. Notice the long flat run in the picture? Trout were rising all in here, but if you got to within 20 ft of them , they would shut down. Be sure when you walk into the river , you observe the water for a few minutes before casting.
working the back of the pool moving upstream, he picked up about 10-12 fish casting 3/4 upstream and across taking a few steps upstream and doing it again. Good luck.

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l114/gltroutman/springbreakcamping2007008.jpg

I can't see the picture at school. But did he have to roll cast?

Waterborn
04-08-2009, 04:02 PM
All great stuff mentioned...my two cents, before you tie on a fly even if you know whats hatching, take a second to see what the fish are doing... granted you could toss a dry anytime or nymph - but a little conscious observation before the first cast can tell you alot about whats going on...ie is there a hatch and what stage, are there splashy rises, maybe some porpoising going on, maybe you see some turning and burning on the bottom, or maybe thiers nothing doing? Check out the currents and plan out your route break it down so you cover the water thoroughly and move on - fishing close in at a tail of a run/pool and work your way across and up stream...and certainly dont pass up pocket water even though it may look to " whitewaterish" find those pockets and seams...

donwinn
04-08-2009, 06:03 PM
Worrgamesguy,

I really think you should go to the prom. It will be really cold up there that weekend. The fish won't be hitting any flies. Bears will be causing problems. Your girlfriend will be scared. It will be dark at night. And most importantly, three friends and I are going to be there that weekend.

You should go to the prom.;)

Worrgamesguy
04-08-2009, 06:45 PM
Worrgamesguy,

I really think you should go to the prom. It will be really cold up there that weekend. The fish won't be hitting any flies. Bears will be causing problems. Your girlfriend will be scared. It will be dark at night. And most importantly, three friends and I are going to be there that weekend.

You should go to the prom.;)

You almost broke my heart, seriously... I CAN'T go to prom, so I felt instantly sick when I read this. I started looking like this :confused: when I read "it will be dark at night." :p

Maybe we could meet up and I could watch you fish, show me how it's done.

milligan trout degree
04-08-2009, 10:13 PM
When you set the hook, don't over do it. I think 75% of the time I get a fly caught in a branch its because I yank the fly too hard and send it flying into an overhead branch...



haha, i can attest that many times.

you can use gel floatant, but i think most prefer frogs fanny because of the lack of mess. however gel can be better on flies where the frogs fanny powder doesn't work in as well such as deer or elk hair flies, but usually still just use the frogs fanny. windy situations can be a pain with frogs fanny as well.

Worrgamesguy
04-08-2009, 10:59 PM
When you set the hook, don't over do it. I think 75% of the time I get a fly caught in a branch its because I yank the fly too hard and send it flying into an overhead branch...



haha, i can attest that many times.

you can use gel floatant, but i think most prefer frogs fanny because of the lack of mess. however gel can be better on flies where the frogs fanny powder doesn't work in as well such as deer or elk hair flies, but usually still just use the frogs fanny. windy situations can be a pain with frogs fanny as well.

To quote someone, look at the bottom right of their post and there will be 3 tabs- "Quote" "Multi" and "Quick." Click the "Quote" button to respond specifically to that post. If you want to reply to more than one, click "Multi" and it will highlight showing you that it has been selected. I rarely use "Quick" because this isn't a fast paced forum.

Worrgamesguy
04-09-2009, 02:46 PM
I bought my Costa Del Mar sunglasses and Coleman Hooligan 3 man tent yesterday. I still need more info, especially getting to Elkmont!

What exit is best off I-40? I saw the exit for Maryville, I just gotta know road names.

PeteCz
04-09-2009, 03:42 PM
Here is the route from Nashville:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=I-40+E&daddr=35.797766,-84.252777+to:E+Lamar+Alexander+Pkwy%2FTN-73%2FUS-321+to:elkmont,+TN&hl=en&geocode=FdB0JwIdWrjU-g%3B%3BFYJqIAIdoz0C-w%3B&mra=dpe&mrcr=0&mrsp=1&sz=10&via=1&sll=35.710838,-83.920441&sspn=0.464983,0.884399&ie=UTF8&ll=35.713068,-83.935547&spn=0.46497,0.884399&z=10

There are a couple of ways, but probably the easiest to get to Townsend and then Elkmont is on US321 right off of I40. Its Exit 364 and you will take a right and stay on that road (US321) all the way to Townsend. This way you avoid driving into Knoxville.

After stopping at LRO (B on the map), you can either take the road along Little River all the way to Elkmont, or you can cut through Wears Valley and make a right at Lyons View Rd and hit the Little River Road at Metcalf Bottoms. Depending on traffic, either way can be a few minutes faster. I usually go over Lyons View Rd. It has a few less curves, but its all about the same timing-wise.

Worrgamesguy
04-09-2009, 04:01 PM
Here is the route from Nashville:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=I-40+E&daddr=35.797766,-84.252777+to:E+Lamar+Alexander+Pkwy%2FTN-73%2FUS-321+to:elkmont,+TN&hl=en&geocode=FdB0JwIdWrjU-g%3B%3BFYJqIAIdoz0C-w%3B&mra=dpe&mrcr=0&mrsp=1&sz=10&via=1&sll=35.710838,-83.920441&sspn=0.464983,0.884399&ie=UTF8&ll=35.713068,-83.935547&spn=0.46497,0.884399&z=10

There are a couple of ways, but probably the easiest to get to Townsend and then Elkmont is on US321 right off of I40. Its Exit 364 and you will take a right and stay on that road (US321) all the way to Townsend. This way you avoid driving into Knoxville.

After stopping at LRO (B on the map), you can either take the road along Little River all the way to Elkmont, or you can cut through Wears Valley and make a right at Lyons View Rd and hit the Little River Road at Metcalf Bottoms. Depending on traffic, either way can be a few minutes faster. I usually go over Lyons View Rd. It has a few less curves, but its all about the same timing-wise.

Beautiful :biggrin:

Kytroutbum
04-09-2009, 04:27 PM
Just a big DITTO on what PeteCz said-Friday night- stay away from PF- Sevierville- Gatlinburg. Head through Townsend and lose the headaches and road rage!!

Randall Sale
The Kytroutbum
The finest gift you can give to any fisherman is to put a good fish back, and who knows if the fish you caught isn't someone else's gift to you?---Lee Wulff

donwinn
04-09-2009, 05:03 PM
Worrgamesguy,

Well it looks like you are still coming. :frown: I am just kidding. We will be leaving Murfreesboro on Friday morning, early. We will also avoid the crowds by going through Townsend. I almost always go that way. Besides, we will want to go by LRO on the way. Then, we will be heading up to camp #24 so I won't be around for you to give me instruction.

I hope you have a great time, and I am sorry about the reason you have to going up there. Over time, you will probably appreciate this trip more than the alternative.

PeteCz
04-09-2009, 06:46 PM
Over time, you will probably appreciate this trip more than the alternative.

The Prom was overrated!! I went to 3 of them and would have much rather been fishing...I think it was an event that Photographers, DJs, Florists and Tuxedo rental companies dreamed up to create more demand for their products...Kind of like all the holidays that Hallmark dreams up...

Some of the best times in life are the spontaneous and unplanned ones, like camping/fishing trips...have fun and enjoy yourself!

sammcdonald
04-09-2009, 06:51 PM
that's lyons springs road....you will turn right by an empty field on the right and a big old brown log building on the left...

Worrgamesguy
04-10-2009, 04:21 PM
Worrgamesguy,

Well it looks like you are still coming. :frown: I am just kidding. We will be leaving Murfreesboro on Friday morning, early. We will also avoid the crowds by going through Townsend. I almost always go that way. Besides, we will want to go by LRO on the way. Then, we will be heading up to camp #24 so I won't be around for you to give me instruction.

I hope you have a great time, and I am sorry about the reason you have to going up there. Over time, you will probably appreciate this trip more than the alternative.

Hahah I agree, I wasn't too enthused about prom anyways.

that's lyons springs road....you will turn right by an empty field on the right and a big old brown log building on the left...

:confused:

PeteCz
04-10-2009, 06:59 PM
Lyons Springs Rd is the road from Wears Valley to Metcalf Bottoms (I had said Lyons View Rd [which is in Knoxville]). Sam was just correcting my mistake in directions...

Worrgamesguy
04-10-2009, 10:50 PM
Lyons Springs Rd is the road from Wears Valley to Metcalf Bottoms (I had said Lyons View Rd [which is in Knoxville]). Sam was just correcting my mistake in directions...

Wears Valley is the 15 mile road that goes into PF, right? Stop light #3? So when I come through Maryville, I'll basically be on the road LRO is on, and instead of turning right to PF keep going straight?

PeteCz
04-11-2009, 10:16 AM
Wears Valley is the 15 mile road that goes into PF, right? Stop light #3? So when I come through Maryville, I'll basically be on the road LRO is on, and instead of turning right to PF keep going straight?

Yes, the easiest (but windiest) way to get to Elkmont is to keep going staright after passing LRO until you get into the park, then you will veer to the left (rather than the right - which goes to Cades Cove)

Here is a map of the Park that may help. If you look at Townsend you will see that there are two ways to get to Elkmont. One along the Little River and the other through Wears valley. The choice is yours.
http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/upload/grsmmap1.pdf

Here are some other good maps:
http://www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/maps.htm

Worrgamesguy
04-12-2009, 09:05 PM
I gotta download the stuff to see those maps, I can't see any of them. Adobe Acrobat, right?

Worrgamesguy
04-15-2009, 10:38 AM
Alright guys any additional info I need when it comes to fishing the Smokies?