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grizzly
04-11-2009, 09:11 AM
I am an absolute beginner at fly fishing and am wondering what are the basic flies to buy and use. I fish the Holston and was there the other day. The guy near me was slaying the trout on nymphs. That's all I could get out of him. All i had were dry flies so I only got one bite. Any help would be very helpful. I plan on stocking my flybox pretty soon, but just don't really have a clue!

PeteCz
04-11-2009, 10:06 AM
Grizz, the forum has search capabilities so you can always checkout past threads for some great info. I did a search on "Tailwater Flies" and found this recent thread, that may answer lots of your questions:

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11954&highlight=tailwater+flies

Carolina Boy
04-11-2009, 08:13 PM
Alright man, first of all zebra midge's get to know em love em, black, red, grewn, tan, and any other color you like, they may like em too. Bead Head Pheasant tails good stuff. I fished the holston today and killed em on a tan, black and brown wooley bugger. Not sure if you tie but the zebra midges are soo easy to tie up so that might be a good start, I would suggest size 18, 20 and 22 when the water is a low bigger bugs when it is runnin. Lot of it is trial and error on the stream to see what color they are hitting and then just freakin slay em! If you wanna know a bit more email me

bmurphy055@gmail.com

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:27 PM
I am an absolute beginner at fly fishing and am wondering what are the basic flies to buy and use. I fish the Holston and was there the other day. The guy near me was slaying the trout on nymphs. That's all I could get out of him. All i had were dry flies so I only got one bite. Any help would be very helpful. I plan on stocking my flybox pretty soon, but just don't really have a clue!


Here's a copy of a South Holston River hatch chart:

January

Hatches






Fly Patterns






Time







Grey Midge


Small Grey Midge:#26-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Grey%20Midge.jpg)


All Month


Creme MidgeCreme Midge:26-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Creme%20Midge.jpg)
Griffiths Gnat:#26-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Griffiths%20Gnat.jpg)
Creme Midge Emerger:#26 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/HolstonRiverCremeMidge.jpg)All Month
NymphsBeadhead Pheasant tail nymph:#16-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymph_2/Beadhead%20Pheasanttail%20Nymph-2.jpg)All Month
Blue Winged OliveParachute BWO:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)Blue winged Olive Emerger:18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/BWO%20Emerger_2.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/BWO%20Emerger_2.jpg)All Month

February

Grey MidgeSmall Grey Midge:#22-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Grey%20Midge.jpg)All Month
Creme MidgeSmall Creme Midge:#22-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Creme%20Midge.jpg)
Creme Midge Emerger:#22-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/HolstonRiverCremeMidge.jpg)All Month
Black fliesClinch River Blackfly Larva:#20-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackfly%20Larvae.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackfly%20Larvae.jpg)Blackfly Emerger:#24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackbird%20Deer%20Hair%20Emerger.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackbird%20Deer%20Hair%20Emerger.jpg)Blackfly Adult:#20-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/ClinchRiverBlackfly.jpg)All Month
SulfursSouth Holston Sulfur Humpy:#14 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20River%20Sulfur%20Humpy.jpg)Spora dic Hatch
Blue Winged OlivesParachute Blue Winged Olive:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)Blue Winged Olive Emerger:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/BWO%20Emerger_2.jpg)All Month

NymphsBeadhead Pheasant tail Nymph:#16-20 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymph_2/Beadhead%20Pheasanttail%20Nymph-2.jpg)

Baby Pheasanttail Midge:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Baby%20Pheasanttail%20Nymph.jpg)All Month





March
Blue Winged OliveParachute Blue Winged Olive:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)
BWO Compara Dun:#18-20
Blue Winged Olive Emerger:#18-20 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymph_2/CDC%20Bluewinged%20Olive%20Emerger.jpg)All Month
Black CaddisClinch River Black Caddis :#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/terrestrials/Black%20Caddis.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/terrestrials/Black%20Caddis.jpg)Blackbird Deerhair Emerger: (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackbird%20Deer%20Hair%20Emerger.jpg)

#18-22
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackbird%20Deer%20Hair%20Emerger.jpg)All Month

Black FliesClinch River Blackfly :20-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/ClinchRiverBlackfly.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/ClinchRiverBlackfly.jpg)Blackfly larva:#24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Blackfly%20larva.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Blackfly%20larva.jpg)Blackfly Emerger:#22-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackbird%20Deer%20Hair%20Emerger.jpg)
Blackbird Deerhair Emerger:#20-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Blackbird_Deer_Hair_Emerger_small.jpg)All Month
MidgesDrive you crazy midges:#18-26 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Drive%20you%20crazy%20midges%20003.jpg)All Month

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:32 PM
April

Tan CaddisHolston River Tan Caddis:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Holston%20River%20Tan%20Caddis.jpg)Mid April
Rock WormGreen Caddis Emerger:#14-18 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Green%20Caddis%20Emerger.jpg)Mid April
BlackflyBlackfly Adult:#22-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/ClinchRiverBlackfly.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/ClinchRiverBlackfly.jpg)Blackfly larva:#22-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackfly%20Larvae.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackfly%20Larvae.jpg)Blackfly Emerger:#20-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Blackbird%20Deer%20Hair%20Emerger.jpg)All Month
MidgesCreme Midge:#22-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Creme%20Midge.jpg)All Month
May- October
SulfursCDC Sulfur Compara Dun:#14-16 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/CDC%20Sulfur%20Com%20Para%20Dun%20001.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/CDC%20Sulfur%20Com%20Para%20Dun%20001.jpg)Sulfur Compara Dun:#12-16 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Sulfur%20Comparadun.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Sulfur%20Comparadun.jpg)Sulfur Humpy:#12-16 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20River%20Sulfur%20Humpy.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20River%20Sulfur%20Humpy.jpg)Sulfu r Hair winged Dun:#12-16 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20Sulfur%20HairWing%20Dun.jpg)
(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20Sulfur%20HairWing%20Dun.jpg)CDC Sulfur Emerger:#14-16 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Sulfur%20Emerger_2.jpg)All Month
MidgesGolden Badger Creme Midge:#30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Golden%20Badger%20Creme%20Midge.jpg)
Creme Midge Emerger:#24-28 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Creme%20Midge.jpg)All Month
NymphsBeadhead Pheasanttail Nymph:#16-20 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Beadhead%20Pheasanttail.jpg)
Baby Pheasanttail Nymph:#28-24 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Baby%20Pheasanttail%20Nymph.jpg)
BWO Emergers:#18-20 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/CDC%20Softhackle%20Emerger%20003.jpg)All Month

November- December

Blue Winged Olive


Parachute Blue Winged Olive:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)

(http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/South%20Holston%20BWO.jpg)Blue Winged Olive Emerger:#18-22 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/BWO%20Emerger_2.jpg)



All Month

Midges



Drive You Crazy Midges: #26-30 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Drive%20you%20crazy%20midges%20003.jpg) October through March



SulfursSulfur Compara Dun:#18 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/dryflies/Sulfur%20Comparadun.jpg)
Sulfur Emerger:#18 (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/tailwater%20trout%20flies/Sulfur%20Emerger_2.jpg)
Beadhead Emergers:#16-18Sporadic thru December

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:37 PM
I would pick a couple of dries that work most or all of the year and use them as indicators (like a bobber) and drop a midge off of that. You should get a lot of strikes on the midge and a few on the dry. Also, learn how to do an across stream drift and mend. It's much more succesful than casting straight upstream. Here's a picture:

http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh261/blueraiderfn/mending_1.jpg

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:41 PM
Videos describing mending:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcaTedAqonY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brhL1yvdPqA

grizzly
04-11-2009, 09:44 PM
Is the Holston River below Cherokee Dam also referred to as the south holston river??? And if it is not does this hatch chart match good enough???

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:45 PM
A good series of fly lessons:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2SgcCw6I8M&feature=PlayList&p=C4DCD1C14DF2887D&index=0&playnext=1

If you can, stop by LRO and get a few lessons in person, if they have a casting class. You just can learn some of this stuff from videos. Also, take an entomology class from them. It's important to learn about what the trout are feeding on, when and why.

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:51 PM
Here's how to rig a dropper...as you can see, the midge (or in this case, the soft hackle) is tied off the bend of the hook on the dry:

http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/hh261/blueraiderfn/dry_dropper_rig_400.jpg

BlueRaiderFan
04-11-2009, 09:54 PM
Is the Holston River below Cherokee Dam also referred to as the south holston river??? And if it is not does this hatch chart match good enough???

Areas of the Holston:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holston_River

And yes, those charts should be fine.

ChemEAngler
04-11-2009, 10:26 PM
All of the hatch charts previously posted can be found at the following link and are produced by Mr. Hugh Hartsell.

http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/East%20Tennessee%20tailwaters%20hatch%20charts.htm (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/East%20Tennessee%20tailwaters%20hatch%20charts.htm )

Regarding the similarities of the South Holston tailwater to the Holston tailwater below Cherokee, there is very little other than the name. The South Holston has phenomenal sulfur, blackfly, BWO, and midge hatches. The Holston is known as more of a caddis tailwater with somes midges and BWO's thrown in there. The hatch chart given below will not benefit you very much below Cherokee dam.

If you are going to fish the Holston, have some caddis larvae and pupae in #16 & 18, elk hair caddis (tan, black, & olive) in 16 &18, zebra midges as mentioned by somebody previously, and some BHPT's in 16 thru 20, and you should be covered.

One common mistake by beginning flyfisherman is using flies that are too large and are typically carried by the big box stores. Using a #12 BHPT will most likely get you nowhere on the holston. Same as if you were using a #12 elk hair caddis. Sure is easy to see, but does a poor job of imitating the size of the most abundant food source.

Secondly, get yourself some 9' 5x leaders. Also buy yourself some 6x fluorocarbon tippet material, it will make a significant difference as well.

Fishermansfly
04-12-2009, 12:56 AM
Retracted.......

BlueRaiderFan
04-12-2009, 01:23 AM
Back to fly fishing.

TNFishnstix
04-12-2009, 08:42 AM
Is the Holston River below Cherokee Dam also referred to as the south holston river??? And if it is not does this hatch chart match good enough???

Grizz, two different rivers. The Holston is as you described, below Cherokee, the SoHo as many call the South Holston is in the very upper north east portion of the state. Many of the same bugs work in both places.

http://www.holstoncastaways.com/river.html
http://www.tva.com/sites/sholston.htm
http://lakeinfo.tva.gov/htbin/lakeinfo?site=CRH&DataType=All&submit=View+info

jarrod white
04-12-2009, 12:27 PM
I think it is very kind to share a little information, however, I also think there is no substitute for time on the river. I feel like just because one man has paid his dues and figured things out on a particular body of water, it is almost an insult to ask him for very many details. I have offered advice to a struggling fisherman before, but I am pretty tight lipped when asked. I just feel like just because some people spend many hours and many years experimenting and learning, why would you want to just give it to Joe Schmo who decides he wants to start fly fishing, he needs to invest some time into it on his own.
Perhaps a casting lesson or two, and a couple of introductory books would be a great start and I am sure that Byron would be more than willing to help you out.

JW

David Knapp
04-12-2009, 01:51 PM
Try soft hackles...

BlueRaiderFan
04-12-2009, 05:26 PM
I think it is very kind to share a little information, however, I also think there is no substitute for time on the river. I feel like just because one man has paid his dues and figured things out on a particular body of water, it is almost an insult to ask him for very many details. I have offered advice to a struggling fisherman before, but I am pretty tight lipped when asked. I just feel like just because some people spend many hours and many years experimenting and learning, why would you want to just give it to Joe Schmo who decides he wants to start fly fishing, he needs to invest some time into it on his own.
Perhaps a casting lesson or two, and a couple of introductory books would be a great start and I am sure that Byron would be more than willing to help you out.

JW

Jarrod,

Good point. I try and give enough to get them on the river catching stockers and leave it at that. I figure the more people we have fishing, the more influence we have on the river. There is so much more to it than what I told him. Good advice on reading books. I've learned a lot by reading what others have learned over years. I don't get out enough to apply it, but I sure like to learn different techniques. If he wants to catch the big one's, he'll have to know a lot more than what I've posted, but you do bring up a good point. If I had my way, every one that fishes for trout for sport would fly fish.;)

PeteCz
04-12-2009, 07:22 PM
I feel like just because one man has paid his dues and figured things out on a particular body of water, it is almost an insult to ask him for very many details. I have offered advice to a struggling fisherman before, but I am pretty tight lipped when asked. I just feel like just because some people spend many hours and many years experimenting and learning, why would you want to just give it to Joe Schmo who decides he wants to start fly fishing, he needs to invest some time into it on his own.


I don't mean to start a fight here, but I disagree. Grizzly, was merely asking a simple question. There is a reason why the number of folks who fish is dwindling and part of it has to do with that fact that there are so few of us encouraging others to take up the sport. And no one will continue trying something if they have limited to no success. There is no way that helping a beginner to pick out a few flies will take away anything from your fishing pleasure. In fact, the next person you help could end up being very connected politically and assist us in improving the quality of our fisheries. If you don't want to help, don't help. But unless you picked up everything on your own, you probably had help at some point as well. I as you ti think about "paying-it-forward". Many folks have helped me through the years and while there is no replacement for time on the water, a little nudge in the right direction might just be enough to help this person. I always try to help if I can. Many have done the same for me.

Here is what he asked:
I am an absolute beginner at fly fishing and am wondering what are the basic flies to buy and use. I fish the Holston and was there the other day. The guy near me was slaying the trout on nymphs. That's all I could get out of him. All i had were dry flies so I only got one bite. Any help would be very helpful. I plan on stocking my flybox pretty soon, but just don't really have a clue!

The guy he talked to didn't have to give out his secret fly. All he really wanted to know is what nymphs should he go purchase...seems pretty harmless.

Had he asked about a particular fly, in a particular place, at a particular then I would completely agree with you (and the guy he ran into on the stream). We can all spot the folks who are trying to take short-cuts to wisdom and I don't think that is the case here. We should try and help those who are interested in taking up the sport. The more folks we have interested in it, the less likelihood it will get regulated into legislative oblivion.

Fishermansfly
04-12-2009, 07:44 PM
The Internet is a global network of interconnected computers, enabling users to share information along multiple channels. Typically, a computer that connects to the Internet can access information from a vast array of available servers (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Server_(computing)) and other computers by moving information from them to the computer's local memory. The same connection allows that computer to send information to servers on the network; that information is in turn accessed and potentially modified by a variety of other interconnected computers. A majority of widely accessible information on the Internet consists of inter-linked hypertext (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Hypertext) documents and other resources of the World Wide Web (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/World_Wide_Web) (WWW). Computer users typically manage sent and received information with web browsers (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Web_browser); other software for users' interface with computer networks includes specialized programs for electronic mail (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/E-mail), online chat (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Online_chat), file transfer (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/File_transfer) and file sharing (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/File_sharing).
The movement of information in the Internet is achieved via a system of interconnected computer networks (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Computer_network) that share data (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Data_(computing)) by packet switching (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Packet_switching) using the standardized Internet Protocol Suite (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Internet_Protocol_Suite) (TCP/IP). It is a "network of networks" that consists of millions of private and public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope that are linked by copper (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Copper) wires, fiber-optic (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Optical_fiber) cables, wireless (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/wiki/Wireless) connections, and other technologies.

Wiki Def-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet

Gotta love the net! But seriously you both bring up good points and something I struggle with frequently. It seems to becoming more and more prevelant as the days pass! Information sharing in fly fishing. More frequently known in fly fishing as "Hot Spotting!" I also believe that someone who jumps in for there first time knowing every secret is not being verry sporty and takes the fun out of the sport. I think that's where you were going with what you said. I think everyone deserves to get the ol fish slap every once and a while. It hones our skills and makes us better fisherpersons!

It's a double edge sword we walk when sharing info. We want the sport to thrive to drive down costs of rods and fly fishing specialty equipment, but we seem scared to share information to help a new fellow out.

Remember that 10% of the fisherman catch 1% of the fish! Something to think about. I don't know where or how the phrase was "coined" but as I continue to fish this becomes a more realistic number.

Finally for the original question. Take a day off brother and spend it at LRO on a slow day. Pick there brains that's what they get paid to do. I hope you enjoy the sport as much as I have and currently do. I hope you do well and learn quickly!

~Brett

jarrod white
04-13-2009, 01:08 PM
I may have sounded harsh, although I don't think so. I didn't say don't help people get involved in the sport, I merely suggested limiting to basics. I always offer the basics to anybody, I just don't say fish in this spot and use this fly at this depth.
Hey , for what it's worth, I enjoy seeing a new person get involved. I do think a large investment of time , and also an investment of money is required.
Good luck.

buzzmcmanus
04-13-2009, 02:17 PM
Wonder why most people think fly-fishermen are snobs!?!

grizzly,
If I knew anything about the river in question, I'd tell you whatever you wanted to know. But, I have a hard time driving past all the good fishing here to get there. Don't let the actions and words of a few deter you. There truly are some helpful ones out there.

kytroutman
04-13-2009, 04:08 PM
Grizz, build a selection of copper johns, zebra midges, prince nymph and the standby is the tellico nymph. I will also use a Krauss nymph pattern I picked up out West.

grizzly
04-13-2009, 07:13 PM
I really didn't mean to open up this can of worms, and I appreciate all the help. I wasn't expecting you all to give me your "honey holes" just needed a little bit of info to get started. Special thanks Carolinaboy, ChemEangler, and kytroutman. Determining what kind of flies you need is so overwhelming when you get started. I needed somebody to focus me in and you all have helped me tremendously with that! My wife always asks me if I caught anything and I always respond, because I don't have the right fly, hopefully now I can't say that!!!

jarrod white
04-13-2009, 08:21 PM
wow , sunshine and lollipops. :rolleyes:

Rockyraccoon
04-13-2009, 08:54 PM
Wow,

You folks are snapping at each other like it's the dead of winter and we're all stuck in the house.

Put down the mouse,

Kiss your spouse,

Load the truck,

go fishing,

and be happy!

Stonefly
04-13-2009, 09:44 PM
[ a Krauss nymph pattern I picked up out West.[/quote]

Kytroutman, I tried googling this but came up dry. What's a Krauss nymph?

sb

kytroutman
04-14-2009, 07:03 AM
It's a stone nymph pattern, often called a K nymph. I picked the fly/pattern up from someone who lives on the Big Horn in MT. He called it a Krauss nymph (probably named for a local). There is also a Kauffman's stonefly nymph that looks similar. The preferred colors are black, brown, golden and olive.

Carolina Boy
04-14-2009, 09:36 AM
Your welcome Grizz, some people in fishing get all secretive? The thing with fishing is in a lot of cases you have to be "right" with a variety of variables, pattern, depth, presentation and so on. Sometime it's easy sometimes not, but I don't have a problem giving advice especially someone new to the game, it can be overwhelming at first, years ago i used to say flyfishing was the most tangley sport in the world. I learned how to flyfish in the park before learning about tailwaters. The greatest thing for me about our wonderful sport is that you learn something every time you go out, and if you don't you probably aren't paying enough attention. That's why I love it, If you really want to find success with this there is no room for the troubles of the day when your out there worriying about, flies, wind, casting angles, was that a riser over there?, what kinga bug is that flying around? Can I make the perfect cast?................Good Luck!

Paula Begley
04-15-2009, 08:21 PM
It's time for this thread to cool off a bit. I'm locking it.

I'd like for all of you to take a look at the theme of this board.

"Information, Fly Fishing and Friendship"

Paula