PDA

View Full Version : Wet your hands!!!!!!!!!


waterwolf
06-11-2009, 03:15 PM
Rowing through 61 shoals yesterday with high sun and low water, I was able to see a ridiculous number of fish as I passed by that showed clear handling marks. I have seen numerous fish each day that shows the same black marks on their bodies from where they have been dry handed.

Take 5 miliseconds and wet your hands, there is no reason to be lazy and it is worth the extra time if you plan on releasing the fish.

This is the first year I have ever seen on the Clinch where it has been a problem, maybe it is the quality of anglers who now fish the river, people who overall don't have a clue how to properly handle a fish.

Worrgamesguy
06-11-2009, 04:26 PM
When I was a kid (still am, just younger) I used to dry hand fish because I couldn't stand the added sliminess. But now, whenever I dry hand a fish absentmindedly, I immediately realize it because of how nasty it feels without a wet hand.

Tippet
06-11-2009, 08:40 PM
I agree, I have seen this a lot on the river and more commonly on these message boards where people think it is necessary to show a picture of every fish that they caught. (This is not everyone, but I am sure people know what I am talking about.) When I catch a fish I do my best to not bring the fish out of the water at all. I don't feel the need to bring it up to show it to everyone around. I catch and release my fish under water and if needed I stick my arm under water to mark my fish so I can tell how long it is. Ex. I have a freckle that is 16.5" from the tip of my finger to it. This helps if I get curious of the length and I still don't hurt the fish.

Carolina Boy
06-11-2009, 09:32 PM
Seems to me that any meat fisherman is gonna keep all their catch, I am sure that is wrong but we flyfisherman carry bias, therefore it would seem that is flyfisherman that are doing this? As much as this seems surprising you gotta think, how many times do you see guys flyfishing the GSNP wearing white t-shirts...my point being not everybody knows things that we assume is basic

BlueRaiderFan
06-11-2009, 09:51 PM
I will always take a picture of decent fish. I do make certain that I face them upstream and hold them until they catch their breath and swin away. I just recently learned about wetting my hands via this board, so keep the reminders going. I forget little things like that.

Tippet
06-11-2009, 10:12 PM
I will always take a picture of decent fish. I do make certain that I face them upstream and hold them until they catch their breath and swin away. I just recently learned about wetting my hands via this board, so keep the reminders going. I forget little things like that.

Another problem you will have if you take a picture of a nice fish especially lying next to your rod is not being able to stretch your fish out when you tell everyone what you caught. It is a lot easier to say you caught a 20" Bow without that picture of your 14" Bow. :biggrin:

waterwolf
06-11-2009, 10:40 PM
Alot of the fish I saw yesterday were in and around the jail area, which is dominated by fly fisherman. Pictures of 12" fish out of the clinch don't prove jack didley, they are a dime a dozen, sporting fish of that size is undue stress which could be avoided.

Also, laying fish on rocks, grass, or anything else to get a picture is utterly irresponsible as well.

If a trout is caught and fought properly in water which isn't warm it should need no reviving, they should bolt as soon as they are freed. However, if fought with limp rods and soft touches it can take much longer. Learn the strengths of your tippet and how much pressure is just enough and it will mean more fish to survive upon release.

I guess people just either don't care anymore, or are so green they just don't get it, but in the past this has never been an issue.

BlueRaiderFan
06-11-2009, 10:53 PM
Yeah, I have a 4wt and it is a bit soft. Takes a lot of effort to get a 12inch fish in. I am going to try and get another 6wt for the tailwaters for my next birthday.

pineman19
06-11-2009, 11:43 PM
Once again, thanks for the wise words Mr Wolf.

waterwolf
06-12-2009, 06:45 AM
Yeah, I have a 4wt and it is a bit soft. Takes a lot of effort to get a 12inch fish in. I am going to try and get another 6wt for the tailwaters for my next birthday.
A 4 wt is fine, I fish a 4 wt everytime, as do many others I know. Rod weight doesn't play a huge role in landing fish. One of the worst rods for fighting fish I have ever used was a Sage 790 RPLXi, it was pretty much worthless.

buzzmcmanus
06-12-2009, 08:13 AM
I read this and decided to edit my post
Is it not interesting how menial and trivial certain issues in life have become! I mean; look how hard it can be at times to enjoy life! Look how divisive Man has made the World.

I just wish things in the World would change and people would change! I am not talking about arguing access rights. I am implying that life has become a journey of fights and arguments.

I used to have a very bad temper and would let it get the best of me. It felt better at times; but, I always looked back in regret that I could have handled things better.

My new intentions in this World are to try and leave it better in some way and to make a positive impact on others.

I understand property owner's reasons too. They may have been robbed, vandalized, or be worried about liability.

I think we do need to work as a group of sportsmen, to lobby and promote positive relations with land owners and the general public. In doing this; we will gain more respect, more results, and more fishing opportunities.

That is my nice lesson for today:biggrin:

BlueRaiderFan
06-12-2009, 08:29 AM
A 4 wt is fine, I fish a 4 wt everytime, as do many others I know. Rod weight doesn't play a huge role in landing fish. One of the worst rods for fighting fish I have ever used was a Sage 790 RPLXi, it was pretty much worthless.

Yeah, just a little small for the Caney. I should have gone 5wt. I wanted a rod that would work well in the Smokys and on the Caney and Elk, but a 4wt is just a touch light on the tailwaters for my taste. Besides, you can never have too many fly rods:biggrin:

Grumpy
06-12-2009, 08:43 AM
& hold your breath the entire time the fish is out of the water, i bet you put it back in quicker:rolleyes:

Grumpy

waterwolf
06-12-2009, 08:54 AM
& hold your breath the entire time the fish is out of the water, i bet you put it back in quicker:rolleyes:

Grumpy


some people just never cease to amaze...

ChemEAngler
06-12-2009, 10:43 AM
You also have to realize that some people out there just don't care. Just as some people don't like to clean their gear before changing tailwaters and crimping down barbs. I don't know if it is being stubborn or stupid, but ignorance is rapidly losing credibility as an excuse. They are simple acts that can help to prolong the resource we all enjoy.

I have wet my hands for years now, and I actually I find it easier to grip a fish with wet hands. Any picture I take with the fish in my hands is with a wet hand. You can't honestly believe that taking pictures of fish is any more detrimental on the health than stomach pumping, fishing with trebles, or even deep hooking while bait fishing.

95% of the time I net my fish first and leave the fish in the ghost net, submerged, while I turn on the camera and get it set. Once I have it set, I let my camera dangle from the lanyard and cradle the fish with a wet hand. Total time that the fish is out of the water for a pic is less than 5 seconds. And they are always released successfully.

waterwolf
06-12-2009, 12:50 PM
There is a fine line, between being cautious and being insanely cautious. Stomach pumping is not necessary on our tailwaters. It is either midges or midges in their stomachs, or sulfur nymphs this time of year. Just not that complicated and thus no reason to pump fish ever. Bait fishing is bait fishing with very high mortality rates and nets with cloth net bags, wet or not, do alot of damage all by themselves, maybe as much as dry handing fish.

You can get as crazy as you wish, but simply wetting ones hands is easy and everyone can do it, and it really would help out.

golfballs03
06-12-2009, 04:05 PM
After I catch them, I like to see how far I can throw them. Is that bad?

PeteCz
06-12-2009, 04:19 PM
After I catch them, I like to see how far I can throw them. Is that bad?

If you pitch them like a horseshoe you'll probably be ok, But if you try a Nolan Ryan on 'em, that may cause a bit of stress...

Now you might get away with a Kent Tekulve delivery...

It wasn't just Willie Stargell who emerged from last year's World Series as a world champion and a folk hero. Consider Kent Tekulve and his Magic Sidearm. His appearances were late-inning cameos, wonderful and improbable walk-ons by a guy who didn't look as if he could do it. He relieved in five of the seven Series games and he saved three of the four Pirate victories, allowing only one single from 16 batters in the last two games.

Says Pittsburgh Manager Chuck Tanner, "I keep reminding Tekulve that he's ugly. I mean ugly. But, I swear, when he comes ambling out there in the ninth inning, he looks just like Paul Newman to me."

Thanks for the diversion!!

pineman19
06-12-2009, 04:50 PM
Personally, I like the end over end toss with the fish landing head first back into the drink smooth as the Arc of a Diver:biggrin:

Name the singer for bonus points.

kytroutman
06-12-2009, 05:19 PM
C'mon pineman, everyone knows, or should know Stevie Winwood.

wynnsman
06-12-2009, 08:07 PM
Ok I may pee off someone but Im just glad people are letting them go....I agree wetting hands is a good idea but my gosh be happy they are releasing them in the first place... I allways wet my hands but I am guilty of laying fish down to take pics but 9 times out of 10 it is on a wet bank or wet grass....

Grumpy
06-12-2009, 10:25 PM
I can't believe the Ketchum Release hasn't been mentioned:eek:

Grumpy

flynut
06-13-2009, 04:15 AM
As long as you wet your hands and make sure the fish can swim away after you snap a quick shot I don't think there's much harm done.

waterwolf
06-13-2009, 04:38 AM
I can't believe the Ketchum Release hasn't been mentioned:eek:

Grumpy
Designed by flyshops to sell more flys :biggrin:, what a worthless piece of gear.

Grumpy
06-13-2009, 07:03 AM
Designed by flyshops to sell more flys :biggrin:, what a worthless piece of gear.

if you don't know how to use it, yes, kinda like a fly rod.

Grumpy

waterwolf
06-13-2009, 10:48 PM
if you don't know how to use it, yes, kinda like a fly rod.

Grumpy

I don't know how to use either, I just started this game last week:rolleyes:

flyman
06-14-2009, 12:14 AM
Best way not to leave marks from handling them with dry hands is to just put your foot on their head and jerk the fly out. Never have to take them out of the water and you can just give them a little "kick start" to revive them and send them on their way:biggrin:

Brian Griffing
06-14-2009, 10:23 AM
When I realized that dry hands took the slime off of fish, I started writing messages to other fisherman before I put them back, "I like caddis", "I'm Nemo", etc. Sometimes I would write numbers on them and then set up little races in the shallows. In the end, I think the performance enhancing drugs I injected them with were more detrimental to their health than messages written in their slime.

Flat Fly n
06-14-2009, 10:26 AM
Does this mean we should stop the ceremonial "kissing of the fish" as well? Does Chapstick with SPF30 offer anymore protection to the fish slime vs SPF15?

Personally if you can't land a trout that is say under 16" in less than a minute or two you should be ashamed of your angling skills and take some lessons from a guide. Constant pressure and getting the fish's head up is the key. It's the overplay IMO that kills these fish more than say a quick photo, especially if that fish is kept in the net in the water until your set up to take the photo.

Green Weenie
06-15-2009, 09:28 AM
When I realized that dry hands took the slime off of fish, I started writing messages to other fisherman before I put them back, "I like caddis", "I'm Nemo", etc. Sometimes I would write numbers on them and then set up little races in the shallows. In the end, I think the performance enhancing drugs I injected them with were more detrimental to their health than messages written in their slime.


:biggrin:That was some of the funniest stuff I've read in a while. ROFLMAO!!!!:biggrin:

stuart
06-16-2009, 10:39 PM
Reminds me of a time on a tailwater where a "client" and an unexperiienced "guide" using the term loosely had a fish on. I watched from a distance and asked as teh drag was screaming is it a good one. They guy said don't know can't pull to hard with 7X in abou what seemed like 5mins he finally landed a 14-15in bow. I was like huh? But oh well, that is the lesson people are getting. I won't fight a fish long. I lost the biggest smallie of my life possible on last Monday trying to end a fight quick when I ahve not doubt I could have wore it down somemore and had a lot better chance of landing it. I made a hurried stupid mistake and now it is just a memory with out a pic. I think poor fish fighting is worse than handling but there is a limit to handling. I have in the last bit tried to make a effort to pick better photo locations and now look back at pics in sand, on dry rocks and stuff and kinda am like what? So reading these posts have taught me something that is positive. So keeping us In check isn't a bad thing. All in all I think it is well meant.

STU

highpockets
06-17-2009, 01:33 PM
Don't know if this helps but I always pull the fish lightly through the water to get it on its side. Then I let the points of his dorsal sort of stick into my hand and use that to flip him upside down. This way he will lay in your hand without touching the sides, and they are much more relaxed (or goofy) upside down.

Using barbless hooks usually means I never have to pick them up anyway. THey kinda release themselves.