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Hugh Hartsell
06-29-2009, 06:58 PM
Fellas and Gals,
The Isonychia Mayfly is hatching in good numbers now and as many of you know, the most popular way to take advantage of this fly is to fish the nymph stage. It does migrate to the banks or rocks during the day and crawls out on on rocks or other debris close to the edge of the stream to hatch out after dark. You will see lots of them on the East Prong of Little River and Abrams Creek and to a lesser extent on some other streams in the Park. They are very abundant on Camp Creek, Paint Creek, Beaverdam Creek ,the Tellico River, and The Doe River as well. There are several good imitations for this fly in the nymph stage so some of you may want to tell about your favorite.
Hugh

David Knapp
06-29-2009, 07:52 PM
Thanks for the reminder Hugh! I need to tie up a few extras before I head to the Smokies again...

nvr2L8
06-29-2009, 08:27 PM
I visited a fly shop in Colorado and one of the prominent flies available was a Caddis pupa; apparently, these were big hitters during a caddis hatch. Have either of you ever fished this fly? If so, when and where?

Rockyraccoon
06-29-2009, 08:59 PM
I've read somewhere that the Leadwing coachman was originally tied as an isonychia imitation. I have no clue if it's true or not but it sure does a fine job.A large #10 -#12 Zug Bug will get you by as well. Whatever you use, I think it needs to be tied heavy. I tie all of mine very heavy to get down in fast water.

In my opinion the isonychia nymph is one bug that fly fishers need to come out of the box to fish. Isonychias are swimmers, and very good swimmers I might add. I promise you fish don't see a lot of iso's dead drifting....not as nymphs anyway.

Remove the strike inidicator and fish that iso nymph like a woolly bugger or light streamer. Tight lined with some action. Cast across, mend.....mend, now strip...strip...strip....pause, strip...strip...strip. WHAM!

The big wide Hiwassee Tailwater presents an exception to the general "isonychia" thought process. While any of the good isonychia nymph patterns will whack fish most of the time during isonycia season, the nymphs have a harder time making it all the way to the shore or exposed structure and end up hatching midstream.

It's usually an afternoon occurence and the fish love it. We get to fish big isonychia dries and the action is great. They never hatch out in huge clouds, instead they just trickle off all afternoon. So the fish get really used to seeing them on occasion and learn to see them as big meals that they will not pass on.

The spinner fall is usually very early morning hours just before daylight, on the Hiwassee anyway. Not sure about the mountains....bu I'd imagine it's semi close.

Great topic.....I love the iso's.

David Knapp
06-29-2009, 10:26 PM
I visited a fly shop in Colorado and one of the prominent flies available was a Caddis pupa; apparently, these were big hitters during a caddis hatch. Have either of you ever fished this fly? If so, when and where?

Charlie,

A caddis pupa can often catch a lot more fish during a caddis hatch than a dry will. Any time you come across a good hatch it is worth trying. If you know the bugs should be hatching, start fishing them during the hours leading up to the hatch just like you would with mayfly or stonefly nymphs. Tellicos work well during the day because the little yellow stonefly nymphs are on the move prior to the evening hatch. Same thing for the caddis... In the Smokies I would focus on a caddis pupa immitation especially early in the season (little black caddis) and during the fall when the cinnamon caddis are hatching. Of course, these are not the only caddis that hatch in the park so having a good variety of patterns is definitely worthwhile. While we were in Colorado, we did very well on pupa immitations so they definitely catch fish when the naturals are on the water...

BlueRaiderFan
06-29-2009, 10:46 PM
Fellas and Gals,
The Isonychia Mayfly is hatching in good numbers now and as many of you know, the most popular way to take advantage of this fly is to fish the nymph stage. It does migrate to the banks or rocks during the day and crawls out on on rocks or other debris close to the edge of the stream to hatch out after dark. You will see lots of them on the East Prong of Little River and Abrams Creek and to a lesser extent on some other streams in the Park. They are very abundant on Camp Creek, Paint Creek, Beaverdam Creek ,the Tellico River, and The Doe River as well. There are several good imitations for this fly in the nymph stage so some of you may want to tell about your favorite.
Hugh

Anyone care to elaborate on what flies represent this species? I did some research on Google, but it's a bit difficult to narrow down which versions are found in the Smokies. Thanks in advance. BRF

tennswede
06-30-2009, 03:15 PM
Mahogany Dun, or Slate Drake should work as generics for Isonychia Bicolor.

Ky Tim
06-30-2009, 04:11 PM
How long will the hatch last? Will they still be coming off when I am there in a couple of weeks?

Hugh Hartsell
06-30-2009, 06:43 PM
Tim,
They usually hang around until frost. They have a sister fly that hatches right along with them (the Giant Golden Stonefly), and they both seem to endure until it gets quite cold.
Hugh

BlueRaiderFan
06-30-2009, 06:56 PM
Mahogany Dun, or Slate Drake should work as generics for Isonychia Bicolor.


Thanks, Hans.

tire guy
06-30-2009, 07:05 PM
Hugh doesn't your Smoky Mountain Balckbird work for this bug?

Hugh Hartsell
06-30-2009, 08:22 PM
It sure does Brian. That rising and falling action that I mentioned to you is a way to imitate the swimming action that Rocky described. As Rocky mentioned, these little buggers are strong swimmers.
Hugh

MBB
07-01-2009, 08:05 AM
Hugh's Smoky Mountain Blackbird is one of my favorite flies. I never go on a trout fishing trip without them.

Rog 1
07-01-2009, 06:02 PM
I will echo the use of a leadwing coachman as a go to when the dries are not working...I have had some of my best days in the mountains high sticking this fly through swift runs with no indicator....my grandfather fished nothing but wet flies in this fashion for years before he even tried a dry fly.....and I have watched him fish many a dry fly in this fashion and outfish me two to one.

tennswede
07-01-2009, 08:33 PM
Rog 1,

Sure sounds like you got it down. Do you fish a lot of spiders also? I love the North Country patterns. I'm going to tie some with starling later this year. I haven't fished much with winged wets but I'm sure they are as good as ever.

BlueRaiderFan
07-01-2009, 08:38 PM
Would the coachman be considered a "classic" fly?

Ky Tim
07-01-2009, 10:27 PM
Tim,
They usually hang around until frost. They have a sister fly that hatches right along with them (the Giant Golden Stonefly), and they both seem to endure until it gets quite cold.
Hugh

Thanks for the info Hugh!

tennswede
07-01-2009, 11:00 PM
Would the coachman be considered a "classic" fly?

The British "Coachman" wet fly was adapted in to a dry fly by Theodore Gordon. A Mr Haley in NY was asked to add durability to the fly and I think he added the red silk to strengthen the fly, and called it Royal Coachman. Sure I would consider it a "Classic"

Rog 1
07-02-2009, 09:50 AM
Another "classic" fly in the Park is the old Ginger Quill....my grandfather told me this was the go to fly when I started fishing up there 50 years ago...asked him why and he just said because it works.....later my high school buddy and I got into the bug work and collected a few samples from the streams to see if we could ID them....once we got the bugs identified we went to a chart to match up the appropriate fly for the bugs and there was the Ginger Quill....great fly for young eyes....but quickly had to start looking for something with a little white on it....best substitute became the royal coachman, then the fan wing coachman, then the royal wulff....have pretty much stayed loyal to anything with a little ginger in the make up....

Mac
07-02-2009, 10:02 AM
Rog 1,

You brought up something that I have been looking into over the last couple months. Collecting insects. This might require a new thread being a little outside the topic of this thread.

But my question is if "legal" what do you use to "preserve" the insect. I have recently purchase some nice glass containers for collecting insects but what do you use in the glass container with the insects?

Sorry if I have gone off track of the orginal intent of this thread, just interested.

silvercreek
07-02-2009, 10:25 AM
Just about everything is going to change the color of the bug. How about a good digital camera with a good macro and take a pic with some sort of scale along side the bug for size?

cherokeeflyboy
07-02-2009, 10:30 AM
Anyone care to elaborate on what flies represent this species? I did some research on Google, but it's a bit difficult to narrow down which versions are found in the Smokies. Thanks in advance. BRF



check this site out www.perfectflystore.com

Jswitow
07-02-2009, 11:48 AM
This can be a great hatch, and as you all say they are swimmers, so no need to worry about drag! I've seen them all over the rocks on Abrams, though I thought later in the summer. If Hugh says they're on, I believe him! A prince nymph worked well as does the excellent nymph they stock at LRO, though it might need a little weight.
Plan to get out and get after them over the holiday, hope you all do as well.
Tight lines,
John

ttas67
07-02-2009, 02:02 PM
mac, you can use iso-alcohol, however, the bug will quickly loose it's color. LRO sells, or can at least obtain for you a product called "bug balm" which is essentially alcohol, but contains some sort of color preserving agents.

BlueRaiderFan
07-02-2009, 06:31 PM
check this site out www.perfectflystore.com (http://www.perfectflystore.com)

Thanks, Cherokee ;)

David Knapp
07-02-2009, 06:57 PM
Originally Posted by cherokeeflyboy http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/images/styles/smartbrown/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?p=69033#post69033)
check this site out www.perfectflystore.com (http://www.perfectflystore.com/)


Thanks, Cherokee ;)

Or you could try this fly
http://littleriveroutfitters.com/store/product.php?productid=17402&cat=993&page=1

BlueRaiderFan
07-02-2009, 07:00 PM
Or you could try this fly
http://littleriveroutfitters.com/store/product.php?productid=17402&cat=993&page=1


Yep and they offer free shipping!;)

Rog 1
07-03-2009, 11:31 AM
When I did my bug research I was a teenager and the rules in the Park were a lot different....I am sure the Park would now frown on removing anything living from the Park...guess you could pick up the spent larva shells from those types of insects...the camera idea would seem to be the best or find you a pocket size directory to carry with you on the stream.

Stonefly
07-03-2009, 06:48 PM
Rog 1, But my question is if "legal" what do you use to "preserve" the insect. I have recently purchase some nice glass containers for collecting insects but what do you use in the glass container with the insects?


Vodka. Has kept a nice golden stonefly pretty intact for about a year now.

sb

silvercreek
07-03-2009, 06:52 PM
Stonefly, you may have started a new drink craze. Instead of a worm in the bottom of the tequila bottle, we flyfishers can have Vodka with a golden stone in the bottom of the bottle. Just a thought.

flyman
07-04-2009, 11:11 PM
Hugh I know you and Rocky have some secret pattens for these, lets see them :biggrin: Most of the time I just fish a PT soft hackle variation. I just add a white hackle stem for the back stripe.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y166/flyman1/fishing%20and%20misc%20flies/fly.jpg

I tied some of Floyd Franke's imitations I saw in Fly Tyer magazine a couple years ago, but they didn't seem any more effective than the SH. I did see a new imitation the other day that I may try when I get a chance.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y166/flyman1/fishing%20and%20misc%20flies/GraphicDesign600.jpg

Hugh Hartsell
07-05-2009, 08:25 AM
Steve,
I read and looked at your fly imitations for this fly and remembered that many years ago that I used an almost identical pattern for the Iso that I saw on Camp Creek. The strain there was more of a brown color and I tied it in a nymph form. I was not into soft hackles at that time. It worked very well. The strains in the Park all seem to be a dark colored version and I changed it to this pattern, which worked for many years.
http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/report%2024/IMGP0509.jpg (http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/report%2024/IMGP0509.jpg)
I took a picture of some nymphs on a rock a couple of days ago and you can see the similarities. http://www.smokymountainflyguide.com/images/nymphs/Isonychia%20Bicolor%20004.jpg
I think these links are backwards but you can see what I'm talking about.

Like yourself, I found about 10 years ago that a soft hackle pattern did extremely well and I developed the SMBBSH and I have stuck with it. Your patterns are beautiful and I always enjoy looking at them.
Hugh

bones
07-05-2009, 10:59 AM
Holy cow the SH pattern flyman ties is almost exactly the fly I tie for my local stream here on post. My largest fish on this stream, a 22in brown, came on a iso nymph We have a pretty steady hatch of Isos here from May through September. The big yella mays we get from the end of May through the first of June also have a similar looking nymph minus the white stripe.

I use turkey instead of pheasents tail on my pattern. The turkey seems to have fuzzier fibers, representing the gills and tails a little more. I use a biot for the stripe. I also break the cardinal rule of SH flies and tie the hackle full.

I tie mine in a #12-#14 on a stimi hook. What size do the bugs down there seem to be?

I aslo tie a para spinner for this hatch. Mainly as just a large bug to float a dropper. The stockers seem to ignore it, but the few runs where the wild fish congregate, it can be effective in the late evenings. I've tried dun patterns but the all ignore them.

flyman
07-05-2009, 11:37 AM
Hugh,
I like your nymph pattern better than Franke's. The gills are so prominent on the natural that I think they just have to be a trigger. I've noticed a little color variation myself. Some are dark brown and some are almost black. The imitation I saw the other day had a dark rusty brown body and ostrich herl for the gills, it looked really good, plus it looked fairly straight forward to tie. I know that the SMBBSH will catch em all the time :biggrin:

Bones,
My SH are tied on a sz14 TMC200, they are a good sized nymph. I never though about using turkey :cool: They are one of best hatches all year down here to. Do you use a whole biot or do you trim it for the stripe?

bones
07-05-2009, 12:33 PM
Whole biot, the end usually gets covered by dubbing and or peacock but they are so delicate trimming them usually means they are lost on the second or third fish.