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todd_grainger
07-15-2009, 01:46 PM
Went to the Hiwassee the other morning trying to catch the water down so that I could wade it. No luck, the fish weren't biting and about 45 min into it I decided to head up to Gee Creek and see if that was any better. Had a blast!!! Wondered if anyone else has found success there, and also how far up do people usually fish that creek. Are there times of the year, or under certain conditions that it fishes better than in the dead of summer? Would love to hear your input on it. I like that creek as it is close to home/work but feels like the smokies where I learned to fish. Would like to fish it more, but thought I would get yall's input as well.

Todd Grainger

fourx
07-15-2009, 04:14 PM
Hey Todd,
I fished up there quite a few times years ago. Glad to see people using the resource.
You know, I didn't have to cover much water or really fish much elevation when I fished there in order to get into trout.
Last time I fished there people were bear hunting in the area and I started to hear dogs so close that I got out of there quick. Another time I was up there and I swear I saw a wolf less then 50ft. from me. It wasn't a dog or fox, I just wonder if it was "introduced" to someplace on federal land and wandered that far?
Gee is a fun place.

4X

tennswede
07-15-2009, 04:16 PM
Todd,

email me at ahlstedt@knology.net. I have some info from the area for the right person.

Scott H.
07-15-2009, 11:49 PM
Todd,

That is a neat little creek with some wild little bows.
I have fished it several times.

I have a buddy who hiked up past the little gorge, and he spotted a bear. He got out of there, and won't go back to fish it with me.

I told him that the bears won't hurt you if you leave them alone, and don't startle them.:smile:

PM me sometime if you ever want a fishing partner up there. I am off most mornings until school starts and I live in Ringgold.

Scott

MadisonBoats
07-16-2009, 09:09 AM
Todd,
Next time, I would recommend taking a water temperature and taking a fine net and seining the stream to see what was coming off...That should help you dial in a workable pattern to get some fish...

Water temp over 60, I would move somewhere cooler...

tennswede
07-16-2009, 06:01 PM
From my experience over the last 15 years or so, you would be hard pressed to find any stream in this part of the world not exceeding 60 in the peak of the summer. Most trout streams are fine to fish up to 65 or so. Much above that and they slow down. Even West Prong of Little Pigeon river is normally at 62 in August as high up as Chimney Tops. Of course during the drought it hit 67. I.e. don't quit fishing at 60 degrees, you'll loosing out on prime fishing. Just from my own experience.

PeteCz
07-17-2009, 08:29 AM
Hans, you're right on about temps. I think the most important thing to keep in mind is the acceptable temp range for each type of stream (in each part of the country). In General the Park and most small mtn streams in ETN and WNC seem to fish bets between 55 and 65 degrees. Shawn I think you are right, in that when most tailwaters start pushing 60 degress things slow down.

Also, fish in the mtns are less likely to hit dries when the temps are below 55, but out west that doesn't apply at all. I have fished with dries in water that was 45 degrees and had crazy activity...so it really depends on what is "normal" for the stream...

MadisonBoats
07-17-2009, 10:09 AM
Thanks for your input guys about the temps...I guess I should have added some more info.. to my first tip..:redface:

What I like to do is move out of the hot spots or zones and look for cooler water. This strategy has been very helpful for me on the Clinch. Not only for the fishing; but, for understanding the behaviors of the aquatic hatch.

I am not very experienced in fishing the streams of the mountains; so, your input is very helpful.

I have been reading about a fishing topic that most World Class Anglers do not give credence too... It is dissolved oxygen content... Yeah, the fish will be in most areas of the stream; but, the big ones need high concentrations of dissolved oxygen to live.... That is why I go where they go to fish...

I am probably taking this aspect too far in most people's opinions. However, I enjoy understanding the behavior of the fish and the WHY's????

PeteCz
07-17-2009, 11:09 AM
I have been reading about a fishing topic that most World Class Anglers do not give credence too... It is dissolved oxygen content... Yeah, the fish will be in most areas of the stream; but, the big ones need high concentrations of dissolved oxygen to live.... That is why I go where they go to fish...

I am probably taking this aspect too far in most people's opinions. However, I enjoy understanding the behavior of the fish and the WHY's????

I think you are right on. I agree that DO is a big factor. That is why in many mtn streams you rarely find the big guys hanging out in pools in the Summer. They have higher DO needs and must move into the broken water which is where a lot of the air (oxygen) mixes in with the water. (And yes, it provides better cover, as well...)

Here is a good article on the subject, as well:
http://www.uwgb.edu/watershed/data/monitoring/oxygen.htm