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Jim Casada
08-22-2009, 08:34 AM
Fellow Forum members--Byron and Paula have most graciously given me permission to post information on my just-published book. Entitled Fly Fishing in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park: An Insider's Guide to a Pursuit of Passion, the work represents the culmination of a marvelously misspent lifetime fishing Park waters, traveling Park trails, camping in the backcountry, and delving into the region's storied past.

The book is a big one, running to 448 pages, and obviously its appearance is timed to coincide with the Park's 75th anniversary (though some of you probably know that I've been working on it for many years). Its 52 chapters include coverage of every major Park stream as well as small feeder creeks, considerable human and natural history, tactics and techniques, "Seasons of the Smokies," equipment, and safety issues.

Other features include dozens of graphs which show changes in stream elevation in comparison with stream length. These graphs (there is one for each of the Park's major creeks and rivers) also show waypoints of note such as backcountry campsites, trail crossings, and feeder creeks. There are scores of both vintage and modern photographs, graphs showing monthly variations in temperature and precipitation, information on guides and outfitters, a removable folding map of trails and backcountry campsites, and an extensive annotated bibliography. My long-time friend and angling literature icon Nick Lyons wrote the Foreword for the book.

My intention was to provide a truly comprehensive guide to the Park, one which addresses all things of interest to the serious angler and does so in much more depth. Folks who read the book in pre-publication form have been very gracious in praising it. Nick Lyons said: "This is a book anyone who knows or plans to visit the Smokies will cherish, but also a book that anyone who takes pleasure in fine writing about the outdoor world and especially fly fishing will greatly admire. I do."

Sam Venable, a name many of you who reside in east Tennessee will readily recognize from his years of writing for the Knoxville News-Sentinel, comments that "a detailed how-to book like this can only come from someone who has 'been there, done that' and knows how to put those experiences on paper. If your passion is trout of the Southern highlands, this book will prove as indispensable as a favorite rod and wading boots."

Then there are the thoughts of none other than Byron Begley, who has been immensely supportive of this project from the outset and to whom I owe an inestimable debt of gratitude. "I am fascinated by this book," he says, "and will be from now on. This is the complete book about fly fishing in the Smokies. It is obvious that Jim Casada knows more about Park streams, the area's history and heritage, and our sport than anyone I know. It is a masterpiece."

The book is available in both paperbound and hardbound forms. The latter comes with a dust jacket. They sell for $24.95 and $37.50 respectively and will be available through Little River Outfitters or directly from me (High Country Press, 1250 Yorkdale Drive, Rock Hill, SC 29730; tel. 803-329-4354; web site www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)).

That's the dope on the book but I would be remiss were I to complete this post without tendering the heartiest of thank yous to Byron and Paula. They represent, in person and in their business, all that is so delightful about our wonderful sport.

Jim Casada

silvercreek
08-22-2009, 08:42 AM
Thanks to you for the info on the book and to Byron and Paula for allowing you to post. You can bet I'm going to get a copy although I do not get to fish the Smokys much anymore. Wouldn't happen to have a chapter on otters would it? Just kidding about the otters.

The Principal
08-22-2009, 11:12 AM
Jim,
When will your book be availible for purchase?
Paul

pmike
08-22-2009, 11:21 AM
Now for a strategy that provokes my wife to "surprise" me with one, believeing it is her idea to do so. By the way I picked up an older issue (2006) of Eastern Flyfishing that had an article by you (Mr. Casada) and thoroughly enjoyed re-reading it, can't wait to get my hands on this book.

God Bless,
Mike

JoeFred
08-22-2009, 11:22 AM
Jim, I am very much looking forward to combing through all 448 pages.:smile:

JF

Jim Casada
08-22-2009, 04:48 PM
Paul--It is, in effect, available now, or at least I'm taking orders. The shipment is scheduled to arrive here on Monday and I'll start filling orders on Tuesday. For those of you who are convenient to Townsend, I'll be drop shipping to Byron and Paula on that day as well. Also, I should have mentioned it in the post that you can read excerpts on my web site (www.jimcasadaoutdoors (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors)). The two shortish chapters on Indian Creek (N. C.) and Road Prong (Tenn.) are there in full along with the Table of Contents and a bit more. Ordering information is available as well. Thanks for your interest.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Carlito
08-22-2009, 06:29 PM
Thanks, Jim! My buddy Elkins had already told me about it, and I've got my fingers crossed for a November birthday present from the lady :)

Byron Begley
08-23-2009, 10:59 AM
Hi Jim and friends,

You are going to love this book. I can't imagine how many hours were spent writing it and all the years accumulating the content in Jim's mind. It is a masterpiece.

Jim sent me the book in a Word Document last year. I opened the document, hit print and started working on something else. Our printer kept running out of paper. When the printing was done I punched the pages and put them in two large three ring binders. And for months I read a little at a time in my office. I love it and can't wait until next week to get the final copies to hold, touch and sell.

I want to thank you Jim for being our friend and a frequent contributor to this forum. That makes it special for me and many other anglers and readers. And thank you for sharing your thoughts and knowledge about fly fishing in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in your book. You should be proud. I'm gonna call it "Pursuit of Passion".

Byron

Rebelsoul
08-24-2009, 11:59 AM
Great news Jim,I love reading and can't wait to get a copy.
Congratulations!

ChemEAngler
08-24-2009, 12:06 PM
Jim,

I just got my copy of Last Train to Elkmont in the mail on Saturday. As soon as I finish reading it, your book will be my next purchase. Looking forward to it. Thanks for all your hard work and contribution to Smokies fishing and this message board.

Jim Casada
08-24-2009, 03:44 PM
Travis--Thanks. The book you are reading is one of perhaps 200 that formed part of my research for my work. FedEx delivered 7,300 pounds of books to my door about two hours ago. I've lifted and moved enough boxes of books, weighing 63 and 69 pounds depending on whether the particular box contains hardbacks or paperbacks, for a while. At least they are all in a protected area now, but I've got lots of busy stuff ahead of me. Thanks for your interest. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

tennswede
08-27-2009, 07:50 PM
Received the book this evening. What a brick. I stood just inside my door glancing through the book for a long while. My cats even got antsy with me as they were waiting to be fed. I had planned on skimming through the book and read it more thoroughly later. Before I knew it an hour passed. It's too early to give a review which I might do on my blog later, but so far so good. I don't agree with certain opinions, which we don't have to go in to here but from my little observation, this book is for all who love the park fishing but not necessarily for fishing fanatics solely. No it can be enjoyed by any outdoor person and even history buffs. Money well spent.

rivergal
08-27-2009, 08:17 PM
Folks, Jim Casada's new book Fly Fishing GSMNP Insider's Guide is a bargain ! It is a treasure trove of information. I am afraid it will be a runaway best seller, and there will not be an empty rock left to fish on once people read this great book. I recommend buying this book lest it fall into the wrong hands.
There will be way too many outsiders becoming insiders. There are lots of photos too. This book would make a real special Christmas gift for yourself or others!

Byron Begley
08-27-2009, 08:56 PM
We just received 24 copies of Jim's new book at the shop. People were calling today to see if they were in. We've got them now. They will be on the Online Catalog as soon as I photograph them this weekend. Right now, you can come by and get your copy or call us and we'll send one to you. Or order from Jim on his website.

Jim,

I got my special copy. Thank you very much. I will use it for the photograph and cherish the gift for the rest of my life. Great job buddy.

Byron

ChemEAngler
08-27-2009, 09:20 PM
We just received 24 copies of Jim's new book at the shop. People were calling today to see if they were in. We've got them now. They will be on the Online Catalog as soon as I photograph them this weekend. Right now, you can come by and get your copy or call us and we'll send one to you. Or order from Jim on his website.

Jim,

I got my special copy. Thank you very much. I will use it for the photograph and cherish the gift for the rest of my life. Great job buddy.

Byron

Byron,
I am planning on swinging by on Saturday to pick one up if you still have any by then.

lee0070
08-27-2009, 09:29 PM
Just ordered mine. Can't wait to read it.

Vern
08-27-2009, 10:07 PM
Got mine today, stopped and opened the box at my truck, never got past the garage door. I went home early from work so I could get a quote done with out interruption. Ended up reading the book for over an hour, so I am setting at my desk finishing the quote at 8:30 pm. The book is like a Pandora Box the more you flip through it the more interesting it becomes.

GrouseMan77
08-28-2009, 06:27 AM
I received my copy yesterday afternoon. I tried to skim through it on the way to my sister's wedding rehearsal. I only got to skim because I still had to explain the finer points of driving to my wife. I think she was also trying to read the book.

Congratulations Mr. Casada!

tire guy
08-28-2009, 07:29 AM
Got my copy yesterday and Wow! The quality is way beyond my expectations. This is a book of display quality. Books of this quality usually cost in the 70 to 80 dollar range just for paper quality. Jim you should be very proud.

Crockett
08-28-2009, 07:50 AM
Alright what time does LRO open in the morning so I can go get one (hopefully they will have some still)...

Jim Casada
08-28-2009, 04:27 PM
Thanks to all you guys (and gal) for the kind comments. Now if there was just some way I had the financial wherewithal to employ the lot of you as my public relations team! Seriously, it is gratifying to have such a positive initial reaction. As you get into it in depth, you will find some pretty staunchly held opinions on equipment and techniques, not to mention in the chapter on "A Peek into the Crystal Ball." After all, I wouldn't be a true son of the Smokies if I I wasn't strong-minded, hard-headed, and somewhat obstinate. That being said, I'll offer two thoughts. First, I feel very comfortable with the depth of historical research. And second, getting to what is probably the single most important element of the book, I think you will find far more "where to" details than in any other printed material. If not, I have spent a wasted (and wonderful) lifetime accumulating such information.
Again, thanks, and as someone who has written a whole host of books, positive things are most gratifying, especially since this book means more to me than anything I've ever done. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

old tom
08-28-2009, 08:06 PM
When I called home (Davidson) yesterday, my wife told me my copy came in. Unfortunately I was in Bryson City fishing. Probably won't find too much sympathy from y'all.

silvercreek
08-29-2009, 11:30 AM
Hot dog! I was just interrupted by a knock on the front door. It was the mailman delivering my copy of Fly Fishing in the Smoky Mountains National Park from LRO. Looks great. The bifocals will get a work out today.

Jim Casada
08-29-2009, 08:00 PM
Old Tom--As someone who grew up in Bryson City, which is where the beginning foundations for this book were laid many decades ago, let me assure you that being bookless there on a stream far transcends any armchair adventure I can offer to you back at your home in Davidson.
Where are you fishing? Deep Creek, Noland, Nantahala, Luftee, or somewhere else nearby?
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

old tom
08-29-2009, 08:22 PM
Jim - I was doing a little recon work on a couple of streams that I've passed many times and thought or said, "Wonder if there's anything in there?"

I fished White Oak, above the falls where it emptys into the Upper Nan. As I expected, because of the falls, I found a few specs. Not many, but decent size. But the stream was real silty. Just above where Winding Stairs meets Wayah Rd. there was a big open area with lots of big rocks and some earthmoving equipment. I suspect that to be the problem. I probably won't give it another try.

Then I went down to Ledbetter Creek. I fished from where a nice new bridge crosses the creek up to where it got too steep for a 62 year old to be fishing alone. What was ahead of me was 50 to 100 yds of house sized rock. I missed a few smallish fish - my guess would be small bows. I'll go back again, staying on the trail until I get above that big boulder run.

lee0070
08-29-2009, 09:14 PM
Old Tom very interesting post on specs in Whiteoak Creek. I know the elevation there is around 2,000-2,300 feet. Seems like to warm of water for specs. It never sees much sun. I think the pipeline from the lake empties into Whiteoak around there. Maybe that is why the water is cold enough.

Jim Casada
08-29-2009, 09:28 PM
Old Tom--You were wise not to try to go any farther up Ledbetter Creek than you did. A couple of years back I decided I'd push on above the nice pool at the lower end of the cataracts. I made it through a series of boulders as it got worse and worse, then decided it was too dangerous and I'd just climb up the ridge and walk back down to the road. Guess what? It was about like trying to climb out of the gorge on Raven Fork. I ended up returning the way I came, a fair amount of it on my butt.
As for the fish in Ledbetter Creek, yes, they are rainbows (or at least that's all I've ever caught there). Jim Casada

Dukee
08-30-2009, 08:00 PM
Had my copy for a few days now, excellent read. I love all the historical background for the different parts of the park. Just now getting into the stream data, but by far it is more in depth than any other book I own on the subject ( and I have several ).

Crockett
08-30-2009, 10:42 PM
I got mine Saturday morning at LRO. They said the books have been flying off the shelves. Thanks Jim I have really enjoyed the book so far!

Jim Casada
08-31-2009, 08:38 AM
Old Tom--I should have noted, in my previous mention of the Ledbetter Creek cascades, that your plan to access the stream higher up from the Bartram Trail won't be as easy as you might think. The trail climbs away from the creek once it crosses on the new foot bridge. There is access to the stream higher up. There's a road off the highway between Topton and Robbinsville which leads into the upper draingage and a fairly large settlement. There are all sorts of gated-off Forest Service roads there, and I'm sure careful study of North Carolina County Maps or North Carolina Atlas & Gazeteer would give some guidance. I've driven around in the area but never attempt to access the stream. Jim Casada

Crockett
08-31-2009, 09:09 AM
Hey Jim I do have one question about the book. In the book where you talk about fishing Little Cataloochee Creek you mention the possibility of staying at the campground at the mouth of Little Cataloochee Creek. When I was over there this weekend camping at the Cataloochee front country campground I drove out the back way to Cosby. The road came down off the ridge and crossed a nice big metal bridge and there was a USGS water guage station on the other side. I also think that just past that is where I saw Little Cataloochee coming in but I didn't see any campground there unless it was off a side road I missed or were you referring to the front country one back in big Cataloochee?

Jim Casada
08-31-2009, 09:17 AM
Crockett--I was referring to the frontcountry campsite. It is quite handy to where Little Cataloochee enters Big Cataloochee. Jim Casada

Crockett
08-31-2009, 09:25 AM
ok I gotcha thanks Jim ;)

Jim Casada
09-02-2009, 07:45 AM
Crockett--I probbly should have added, in my quick response, that one thing which makes Little Cataloochee special is the fact that neither trails nor a backcountry campsite exactly beckon. Here's a decent-sized stream with a rich human history and plenty of trout which is truly off the beaten path. There are plenty of them like that in the Park, but when it comes to one where there was an appreciable human presence and extensive agricultural activity in pre-Park days possibly none is now as isolated and little visited as Little Cataloochee. It's by no means the best trout stream in the Park--not even close--but it has a great deal of appeal (as do several of the other streams of similar size in the Cataloochee Valley complex). Hope this adds a bit more insight, although since you have my book you know I'm quite enamored of this lovely area. Jim Casada

Dawgvet
09-02-2009, 04:00 PM
Called LRO and they have already sold out of their first batch of books. I had Paula hold a hardback for me when the next batch arrives. Looking forward to reading it. Thanks for all your work Mr. Casada.
Jedidiah

Jim Casada
09-02-2009, 05:04 PM
Jedidiah--I shipped another order to them in yesterday's mail, and even with the vagaries of the Postal Service, they should be in Townsend before the week is out. Thanks, and I hope you enjoy the book. Jim Casada

kytroutman
09-03-2009, 12:33 PM
Mr. Casada, any scheduled book signings yet?

Jim Casada
09-03-2009, 12:50 PM
Kytroutman--I've got a few signings and/or talks lined up, and you can visit my web site (www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)) and check my schedule to see some of them. Or, if you don't already get my monthly e-newsletter, sign up to receive it, again on the web site) and I'll be updating them. If you are in Kentucky, however, I don't imagine I'll venture that far afield. I do plan to be at next year's Troutfest in Townsend in mid-May. Thanks for your interest. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

kytroutman
09-03-2009, 12:59 PM
Thanks Mr. Casasa. It's too late in the season to head to McBee for peaches or I could have stopped by and had you sign a copy. I'll keep tabs on your schedule to get a signed copy.

Rebelsoul
09-03-2009, 02:45 PM
Jim,
I just put an order in the mail for your new book,can't wait to read it,sounds like a good reference book to use for years.
Rick

old tom
09-03-2009, 09:12 PM
I'm still in the skim mode on the book. (Too much else to do outside when I know the book will still be here on a rainy day.) I know you give a lot of credit to brother Don and he deserves it. His elevation graphs are most interesting and helpful. Maybe others have seen such graphs in fishing books, but I haven't and it was a duh-huh moment when I first saw them. It's such a simple concept.

Also, great pictures.

flyred06
09-03-2009, 09:24 PM
Got mine ordered today. Cannot wait to read this book. Thanks Paula for taking the order and getting it shipped out so quickly.

Jim Casada
09-04-2009, 08:16 AM
Old Tom--I can't tell you how much I appreciate your kind comments about my brother's efforts on the graphs. They were his idea and like you, once he made the suggestions my immeiate reaction was: "Why hasn't someone thought of that before." The graphs taking a bit of studying to understand, although the principle underlying them is quite simple. For anyone interested in covering a lot of stream miles or getting into rugged terrain, they can be really helpful in getting a feel for just what you are facing and what the character of a stream will be like.
Incidentally, a goodly number of the color photographs, probably close to half of them, are Don's. I took most of the other shots, but my fishing buddy from boyhood, Bill Rolen, contributed, as did several other folks.
I'll share your kind words with Don, whom I know will appreciate them. Jim Casada

justfishing
09-04-2009, 11:43 AM
Jim,
Can't wait to pick up a copy. Planning on stopping in LRO on Monday.


<'))))><
justfishing

LRPop
09-04-2009, 04:00 PM
Jim Casada, how many pages does this book have? Does it have an index? LRPop

Jim Casada
09-04-2009, 04:06 PM
Jim Casada, how many pages does this book have? Does it have an index? LRPop
LRpop--The book is 448 pages plus a folding map of the Park showing maintained trails and backcountry campsites. The book does not have an index. I pondered this for a time, but in the end decided it was not worth the considerable trouble. I figured most people would want information on a specific stream, and each of them (at least all those of any size) is covered in a separate chapter. You can go to my website, www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com), and look at sample excerpts which include the full Table of Contents. Thanks for your interest. Jim Casada

LRPop
09-04-2009, 04:09 PM
Jim Casada, I just received my copy of the book, but it only has 440 pages. What is missing if the book is supposed to have 448? Thanks. LRPop

Jim Casada
09-04-2009, 04:36 PM
Jim Casada, I just received my copy of the book, but it only has 440 pages. What is missing if the book is supposed to have 448? Thanks. LRPop
You need to go to the front of the book and you will find that there are eight pages with Roman numerals before you start the Arabic numberal pages. The title page, Table of Contents, and other preliminaries are those eight pages. This is the standard approach to handling page numbering. If a cataloger or librarian was listing it, the description would be thus: Jim Casada, Fly Fishing in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park: An Insider's Guide to a Pursuit of Passion. Rock Hill, SC: High Country Press, 2009. xviii, 440 pages. Illus., maps.
In other words, there are 448 pages, but the numbering (which is standard) threw you off. That's probably about three times what you wanted to know, but since I was the author of three bio-bibliographies back before I became a recovering professor, I couldn't resist the opportunity you offered me to wax pedantic. Hope this clarifies everything. Jim Casada

LRPop
09-04-2009, 04:40 PM
Jim Casada, thanks. That is one thing that I did not learn after working in the Auburn University R. B. D. Library for 37 years. Never to old to learn new tricks, I guess. LRPop (Jim W. Jones-Auburn, Alabama)

Jim Casada
09-04-2009, 04:45 PM
Jim Casada, thanks. That is one thing that I did not learn after working in the Auburn University R. B. D. Library for 37 years. Never to old to learn new tricks, I guess. LRPop (Jim W. Jones-Auburn, Alabama)
LPop (Jim)--You have flat-out made my day! Any time I can share a bit of arcane knowledge a librarian didn't know (my mom was a small town librarian, although she had no training other than fine people skills and a love of reading) I smile like B'rer Possum feasting on a mess of sticky sweet persimmons.

Byron Begley
09-04-2009, 08:27 PM
Justfishing,

Please call the shop tomorrow and have them put one back if there are any left. I saw a dozen or so on the display this morning and I think we were down to one book and it was a soft copy when I left the shop tonight. We have a special display set up right as you enter the store. Customers can't miss it. Paula ordered more from Jim today but shipping will be non-existent on Monday because it is a holiday. I think we have sold 74 books in about a week but I don't do the ordering and I'm going on hearsay. We were not prepared for this much demand. If we don't have it we'll send one to you on Tuesday or Wednesday and start keeping more in stock.

Jim, You've got a winner brother.

Byron

jeffnles1
09-04-2009, 08:52 PM
Byron,
I ordered a hard back earlier in the week. I'm not in a hurry. If there's someone who needs one pronto, please put mine on back order and get it out to someone else. I can wait until the next batch comes in (or even the batch after that if need be).

Jeff

Jim Casada
09-05-2009, 07:33 AM
Byron--I don't know about a winner, you and other readers will have to judge that, but I do know that it feels good finally to have a project which has been in the making all my life and rattling around in my mind for 20 years completed. Of course I've already learned of one little trout-holding branch I left out, found two spelling errors, and gotten a wonderful anecdote about Kaiser Creek (now identified on most maps as Balsam Corner Branch). Kaiser Creek purportedly got its name from a logger who, in the late teens, said "this creek is rougher than that old Kaiser!" He was, of course, referring to the German Kaiser Wilhelm.
Such information, findings, and tidbits will no doubt continue to emerge, but for now, thanks to you and others for the kind words. If nothing else, the book came from the heart. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

rivergal
09-05-2009, 08:04 AM
I made the mistake of only buying one copy of Jim's new book. Ever since that book arrived it has been involved in a tug of war!

JoeFred
09-06-2009, 09:17 AM
Jim,
your insights... immense,
guidance... genuine,
pursuit... painstaking,
passion... priceless.

JF

Jim Casada
09-06-2009, 10:02 AM
Fred--Thanks ever so much for your gracious comments. You are hired forthwith as senior public relations man, although I fear the pay rate amounts to just a bit less than what a gallon of blackberries or a #8 bag of poke sallet fetched when I was a lad (two bits). I am deeply appreciative. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

pinksanjuan
09-06-2009, 11:39 AM
Jim Casada is a legend

jeffnles1
09-07-2009, 08:54 PM
Just got my hard back copy the other day and got a chance to start reading it tonight. Really nice book. Love the color photos in the back and the high quality paper. It's a very pretty book.

I'm only abuot 15 pages into it but thumbing through and reading some of the farther back pages, I think it's going to be a winner. So far, it seems very well written and interesting to those of us who love fishing in the area.

Jeff

Dawgvet
09-07-2009, 11:14 PM
I will have to add my accolades for the book as well. I had Paula hold me a hardback copy and picked it up Saturday. Very well written and the unique perspective of a lifelong enthusiast vs. a recently researched project shows through wonderfully. I particularly enjoyed the story of Buford Messer and his use of nymphs. My greatgrandfather was a Messer; wish some of the subsurface skill could be a family trait.
Great book and much more than the common where-to/how-to book.
Jedidiah

Jim Casada
09-08-2009, 12:17 PM
Jedediah--Thanks for the comment about the book going beyond the "how to" and "where to" coverage. That was certainly my intention, something I've tried to achieve through lots of anecdotes, delving into the Park's rich human history, and the graphs my brother put together. For those of you who have the book, I would strongly recommend giving the graphs a careful look. My brother, Don, is an avid hiker, and in the course of his rambles in the Park (he does 15 to 25 mile hikes once or twice every week somewhere in the Park) he soon discovered that existing hiking and trail books were for the most part woefully deficient in providing an indication of ruggedness, elevation change, and the like. The graphs are intended to do that for anglers, and when the curve starts rising rapidly over just a mile or two, you know you are looking at plunge pools and rough going.
As for the Messers, I've know a mess of Messers. Buford was quite a character as were, for that matter, most of the early rangers. They were a different breed from the average run of rangers today, at least in part because almost to a man they were natives of the Smokies.
Again, thanks for your nice comments and those of others. Jim Casada

JoeFred
09-08-2009, 12:23 PM
Jim, please relay to your brother, Don

"From one engineer to another, kudos on the graphs. Excellent idea! Great presentation!"

Joe Fred

Jim Casada
09-08-2009, 12:30 PM
JoeFred--Consider it done, and he'll be tickled. The conception and rendering was entirely his doing. All I did was gladly and gratefully embrace the concept when he suggested it. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Jim Casada
09-10-2009, 10:15 AM
Fellow Forum members--It was a happy day for me, as work on this book got into the short rows, when Byron suggested I might want to visit the Forum and check it out. I've enjoyed the postings, picked up a number of tidbits of useful information, and hopefully been able to help out a bit with postings of my own.

At any rate, the whole Byron-and-Paula operation has impressed me so much, from the time I first darkened the door a couple of years ago (I actually did so because I was stuck in a Christmas parade traffic jam, probably the only such jam that ever happens in Townsend, and happened to be right alongside the shop), that I've agreed to contribute some of my thoughts to the monthly newsletter.

Byron invited me to do this and most of my contributions will focus specifically on sites and situations in the Smokies, as opposed to more general information. I've already sent him the first two or three pieces, and I've got ideas for a bunch more. I may throw in something on backcountry cookery somewhere down the road, but most of my scribblings will focus on sharing thoughts and suggestions coming from lots of years and lots of stream miles in the Smokies.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

BlueRaiderFan
09-10-2009, 10:42 AM
Looking forward to it!

Carlito
09-10-2009, 01:30 PM
Cool! Thanks, Jim. All of us (young, old, newbies, and veterans) really appreciate you sharing.

Rebelsoul
09-10-2009, 01:56 PM
I received the book in the mail today,it looks great,and I can't wait to dig into it.
The old pictures in the back are really cool,it would be another great book to do historic pictures of activities in the Smokies...there might be one already,I don't know.
thanks Jim!

Jim Casada
09-13-2009, 04:19 PM
Rebelsoul--There are actually several books based primarily on photographs from pre-Park days, although none of them is devoted primarily to sport. The biggest of these is one of Duane Oliver's works on Hazel Creek. I'm working from a sometimes faulty memory right now, I'm away from my lhome and my library, and I'm enjoying the delicious kind of fatigue which comes from a number of hours on a stream (had a good day on Luftee in the Toe String area), so I may get the title a bit wrong. It is "People and Places Along the River" or something close to that. There's also a collection from the Park archives compiled, I believe, by Ed Trout, and other works.
But what I used came largely from my own collection. I probably should have spent two or three days at Sugarlands, but time got to weighing heavy on me and I also know that the Park's archives are not in the kind of condition and status you would get, for example, at a university archives. Like you though, I am fascinated by the old images.
On an entirely different note, I was check by a Park ranger today (I pulled in front of her and parked when she had a vehicle stopped, offering the perfect opportunity) for the first time in literally decades. I told her immediately I was delighted to be checked and wish it happened more. Poaching remains a problem, I'm fairly sure, but I think they are more worried aobut things like bear and elk jams, frontcountry issues, "sangin'' (ginseng poaching), and the like than they are renegade anglers. Aesthetically it was, never mind cardinal flower in full bloom and Joe Pye weed hanging heavy with bloom and butterflies, a disappointing day. Must be some kind of motorcycle rally because Harleys and their horrendous noise were everywhere. Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Rebelsoul
09-14-2009, 08:45 AM
Jim,
Thanks for mentioning the books,I'll look for them,history is a big thing to me,anytime I find something I like to do like flyfishing,I like to read about the early anglers.
As far as "sangin",there has to be lots of illegal digging in the park because of the vastness of the area.My grandfather and I used to dig sang in this area,Middle Tn., many years ago,and I remember countless days walking and digging all day long with just a couple of apples in our pockets,we didn't even carry water,just found a spring and cupped our hands and drank....I wouldn't do that nowadays.
I love your book,just the right mixture of fishing stories,history,and legend,along with places to go.
One thing on my list is to visit Mark Cathey's grave someday.One of my best friend's last name is Cathey,and there are several families with that name in this area.One noteable occupation of the older Cathey's here was being "moonshiners"....for a few,that's all they ever did.
One question....what made Mark Cathey so legendary,was it his ability to fish so well,or that coupled with being a well known old guy in the area.

tjw37909
09-14-2009, 02:03 PM
Got paid today.........have to got to Knoxville tomorrow...........I see no reason why I shouldn't swing by LRO to pick up some flies, tippett, and a copy of "the book".

Crockett
09-14-2009, 07:34 PM
I stopped in at LRO on Friday and got a second copy for my good friend Matt who I fish with a lot. I am excited cause I think he will love it like I did.

Jim Casada
09-15-2009, 06:17 PM
Jim,
Thanks for mentioning the books,I'll look for them,history is a big thing to me,anytime I find something I like to do like flyfishing,I like to read about the early anglers.
As far as "sangin",there has to be lots of illegal digging in the park because of the vastness of the area.My grandfather and I used to dig sang in this area,Middle Tn., many years ago,and I remember countless days walking and digging all day long with just a couple of apples in our pockets,we didn't even carry water,just found a spring and cupped our hands and drank....I wouldn't do that nowadays.
I love your book,just the right mixture of fishing stories,history,and legend,along with places to go.
One thing on my list is to visit Mark Cathey's grave someday.One of my best friend's last name is Cathey,and there are several families with that name in this area.One noteable occupation of the older Cathey's here was being "moonshiners"....for a few,that's all they ever did.
One question....what made Mark Cathey so legendary,was it his ability to fish so well,or that coupled with being a well known old guy in the area.
Rebelsoul--While I include quite a bit of information on "Uncle" Mark Cathey in the book, I have much, much more. Several things make him stand out. He was what the mountain folks call "quair," which is to say he was decidedly eccentric. Anecdotes aobut this amazing character abound, and I've avidly collected them all my adult years. My father knew him, which helped, and I've talked to several others who knew him as well.
As for Mark's fishing ability and renown, I think the key things were (1) He was the first in the area to use a dry fly (most everyone used wet flies) and (2) He fished almost exclusively by "dancing" the fly like a living insect. According to my father, by today's fly fishing standards he would have just been another good fisherman; but in his day he was in a class by himself.

If you want to hear a short bit of Mark actually talking, google his name and you'll find something with the Dictionary of Smoky Mountain English project. Most other entries will be articles I've written on him over the years. INcidentally, for any of you who are really interested in learning more about mountains folkways, this dictionary is an absolute jewel. It takes mountain expressions and describes their meaning as well as giving examples of where they have appeared in print. For example, sigogglin' means cattywampus, and if that doesn't help, it also means off plumb or not straight. It's a huge and hugely impressive book. If you listen to Mark (it's from one of the scores of recordings Joe Hall made of mountain old-timers in the late 1930s and early 1940s) you'll see he has a keen, high-pitched voice, something which was once fairly common. Or at least it was common in Swain county, where I grew up.

As for Catheys and "peartin' juice," Uncle Mark was an expert when it came to turning corn to liquid form and also when it came to sampling the product. He apparently, at least if one judges by his epitaph, changed his ways in his final years.

I realize this is probably much more than you wanted, but I'm wound up for hours on Cathey.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Rebelsoul
09-16-2009, 09:04 AM
Thanks Jim,
All my life ever since I was big enough to seek them out (over 50 years),I talked to oldtimers about everything in the past and their ways and lives.
I have heard any and everything from "haints" to "being between the acorn and the hull"...and "having a hard row to hoe".
All the oldtimers I hung around are gone now,I wish I had recorded and filmed them as they told their tales and stories,as I get older I find I've forgotten more than I should have but ever so often something will spark a memory of some old person and what they "learned" me.
And I do know how some folks were "quair"....one "Bad Eye Griffin" comes to mind.
It seems that the oldtimers here had much in common with the mountain folks and many had relatives and ancestors from the region,I have some from the Johnson City area myself from long past.
Rick

silvercreek
09-16-2009, 10:00 AM
Jim, do you know anything about the "bear man" and the "troutman"? I ran into these two guys years ago at Metcalf Bottoms and they were kind enough to share some trout they had cooked up. This was also the time I walked down to the water to have just one last look at the water before we went home, and I saw a trout cruising along in plain sight that probably was 30 inches long! Silvercreek

Rog 1
09-16-2009, 11:06 AM
My grandmother was from a family of hill people between Sevierville and Douglas Dam...her 6 brothers all lived and farmed several of the "hollars"..one of my great uncles..Uncle Hal..spoke this dialect and it was like music once you got used to it...you could pick his voice out of a room of a 100 people with you eyes closed...when I was yound and spent most of my summers in this area most of the people talked this talk but nowadays it seems like everyone sounds like they are from somewheres else...this was something that set this area apart from where I was living and I miss it.

Jim Casada
09-16-2009, 05:12 PM
Jim, do you know anything about the "bear man" and the "troutman"? I ran into these two guys years ago at Metcalf Bottoms and they were kind enough to share some trout they had cooked up. This was also the time I walked down to the water to have just one last look at the water before we went home, and I saw a trout cruising along in plain sight that probably was 30 inches long! Silvercreek
Silvercreek--Somewhere in the dusty recesses of my mind I recall mention of "Trout Man," although it may have been a moniker attached to someone on the N. C. side. I'd love to know more about these two characters. One has to believe that in the course of 75 years of existence the Park has been home water to dozens of curious, quaint, and "quair" individuals.

As for your vision of that monstrous trout, I'm guessing it haunts your dreams. I can still see, in my mind's eye and 50 years after the fact, a huge rainbow I hooked at the lower end of the Bumgardner Ben (Deep Creek) one day after a sudden and heavy shower. It took off upstream like a runaway Greyhound bus taking a dirt road, and as a teenager I had no concept of getting a fish on the reel. It snapped the tippet and then jumped well out of the water three times. It wasn't 30 inches, but it was far and away the biggest rainbow I've ever seen in the Park.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Jim Casada
09-16-2009, 06:14 PM
Rog 1--I never, ever hear the old mountain accents anymore, although I do occasionally hear the old expressions, adages, truisms, and folk wisdom. The closest you'll come, at least within my span of knowledge and experience, to yesteryear's folkways is in rural Graham County, N. C.
There's also an hour-long video narrated by Gary Carden, a wonderful talent, with the title of Mountain Talk or something like that. It features some music and lots of talk form the late Popcorn Sutton (a moonshiner who committed suicide a few months back rather than go to prison) and a fellow over Robbinsville way.
I knew Popcorn and what a character he was. I've also sampled his squeezin's. He even wrote a book, Me and My Likker.
I once asked him, knowing it would light his fuse, if he had ever run across a fellow by the name of Colin Flack (a Federal ATF agent who worked the WNC region). He turned the air blue for about three minutes and concluded by saying that blankedy blank cost me $4, 218.47 (maybe not the figure he gave but he voiced it down to the last penny) and a perfectly good still."
Just what this has to do with trout I'm not sure, other than the fact that both trout and fine peartin' juice require clean, pure mountain water.
Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Rebelsoul
09-17-2009, 09:27 AM
I didn't know Popcorn Sutton but was well aquainted with him from seeing him several times on tv...I knew he died but didn't know he did himself in.
He reminded me so much of the old people around here long ago.
One of the Cathey clan that I mentioned earlier met up with me and my grandpaw one day and Pop asked him where he had been for so long,(he already knew as did everyone),Cathey said,"I bin down in Atlanner...in tha pin."...he had a second home there at the Federal Pen.

As for memorable fish,I was fishing a hole of water with my line between a log and big tree roots and hooked a smallmouth that took off upstream and bent my pole over the log so fast I couldn't do anything,in the second before the pole would break the line snapped....I figured the fish to be between 4 & 5 pounds and was in a fairly small creek.

tjw37909
09-17-2009, 11:43 AM
Jim,
You mentioned in your book that there are some brown trout in the lower reacheds of Greenbrier. I have heard that the state tried stocking them below the park approximately 10 years ago. I was wondering if you have any more information about the Greenbrier browns like how plentiful they are, how big they are, and where they came from.

Jim Casada
09-17-2009, 12:43 PM
tjw--I can answer one of your three questions--on where the browns came from. In Greenbrier, like the situation elsewhere in the Park, the browns reached Park waters by migrating upstream from state waters, where they had been stocked. The occasional brown was a holdover, successfully reproduced in Park waters, and at that juncture you have what I personally define as a wild trout--one that was born in the stream.
To my knowledge the Park stocked brown trout only one time, but they stocked tens of thousands of rainbows and once had their own hatcheries. I discuss some of the hatcheries, at Kephart Prong and in the area where the Chimneys Picnic grounds sit today, in my book.
I've always thought it ironic that the Park is adverse to non-native species yet they busily stocked non-native trout for decades.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

lauxier
09-17-2009, 01:53 PM
jim:i received your book.I found your book well written,interesting, and the best guide to smnp fishing yet written.You've heard all this in other post's.The subject of this post started about 3 months ago when I bought a box of books at an estate sale.One of the old books in the box was "last train to elkmont".It is a "little" book by a guy who wrote a "down home"type column for a knoxville newspaper."last train" is a somewhat unorganized but facinating collection of articles,stories,and mountain tales,about a smoky mtn eden,that falls prey to the lumber industry,and corporate big bucks resulting in company boom towns,railroads and lots of "foreigners".The great virgin forests,are cut.The awesome steam engines of the day pack out ga-zillions of board feet of the virgin lumber and a way of life that is never to return.
Somehow,jim,I associate your book with "last train",because you remind the reader constantly of the "old way",the old places, theold railroad beds,the old lumber settlements,and how the "natives" made a life for themselves, in the pre and post lumber.national park days.This is what seperates your book from the others,your book is a guide to fly fishing in the park but it is also a kind of testament to what was,and what was lost,which defines your "passion" if not love and moral respect for an ecosystem that just happen's to grow those pesky little trout,a place so sublime,that we just can't wait to to return...

Rebelsoul
09-18-2009, 08:41 AM
I know we're wandering all over here talking about everything but man,I love your book Jim!
I can't put it down at night...it's going to be a "go to" book for as long as I can get out and look for places to fish..."and if'n I cain't go no more,it'll be a wishin' book".
Rick

Jim Casada
09-18-2009, 09:13 AM
jim:i received your book.I found your book well written,interesting, and the best guide to smnp fishing yet written.You've heard all this in other post's.The subject of this post started about 3 months ago when I bought a box of books at an estate sale.One of the old books in the box was "last train to elkmont".It is a "little" book by a guy who wrote a "down home"type column for a knoxville newspaper."last train" is a somewhat unorganized but facinating collection of articles,stories,and mountain tales,about a smoky mtn eden,that falls prey to the lumber industry,and corporate big bucks resulting in company boom towns,railroads and lots of "foreigners".The great virgin forests,are cut.The awesome steam engines of the day pack out ga-zillions of board feet of the virgin lumber and a way of life that is never to return.
Somehow,jim,I associate your book with "last train",because you remind the reader constantly of the "old way",the old places, theold railroad beds,the old lumber settlements,and how the "natives" made a life for themselves, in the pre and post lumber.national park days.This is what seperates your book from the others,your book is a guide to fly fishing in the park but it is also a kind of testament to what was,and what was lost,which defines your "passion" if not love and moral respect for an ecosystem that just happen's to grow those pesky little trout,a place so sublime,that we just can't wait to to return...
Lauxier--Thanks for your kind comments. Two responses form this end. If you really enjoyed Last Train to Elkmont, you need to acquire a copy of Whistle Over the Mountain as well, and if life in the logger's world intrigues you, another fine book is Dorie: Woman of the Mountains.

As for the portions of the book which deal with human and natural history, forgotten tales and vanished trails, lost folkways, and more. that's just me. I always felt that any detailed treatment of Park fishing merited the full fabric of the experience as opposed to nothing more than barebones how to and where to. If I succeeded in some measure in providing that, I'm happy.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Rebelsoul
09-18-2009, 01:04 PM
A friend just loaned me the book "Our Southern Highlanders",by Horace Kephart.
It is a great time to read that one along with your book Jim,I can't imagine seperating fishing in the Smokies from the history of the people who scraped out a living there.
I know not all people love history like we do,but to me it is going to add to the experience of fishing in the streams where those people have already waded before.
Just like you tying on a Gray Hackle Yellow and fishing where Mark Cathey did his "dance of the dry fly".

Jim Casada
09-18-2009, 01:19 PM
A friend just loaned me the book "Our Southern Highlanders",by Horace Kephart.
It is a great time to read that one along with your book Jim,I can't imagine seperating fishing in the Smokies from the history of the people who scraped out a living there.
I know not all people love history like we do,but to me it is going to add to the experience of fishing in the streams where those people have already waded before.
Just like you tying on a Gray Hackle Yellow and fishing where Mark Cathey did his "dance of the dry fly".
Rebelsoul--Read and enjoy Kephart's book, but as you do so realize that his was anything but an accurate overall depiction of the mountain people of the early 20th century. He is guilty of considerable stereotyping, way too much sensationalism, and a fixation with moonshining (some 40 percent of the book is devoted to that subject). If you are sufficiently interestd, you might want to read my quite lengthy INtroduciton ot another of his books, Camping and Woodcraft, and compare what I say about him with the thoughts of george Ellison, who wrote the Introduciton to Our Southern Highlanders. Or go to the back issues of Smoky Mountain Living and read an article I wrote on Kephart in its pages three or four years back. Or maybe best of all, read what Judge Felix Alley, a true son of the Smokies, had to say about Kephart in his book, which has a title something like Random Musings of a Mountaineer. Alley absolutely skewers both Kepahrt and Margaret Morley. I take great pride in my roots and take great umbrage at those, such as Kephart, who impugn them.

Nor do I take kindly to the fact that he deserted a wife and six children. He was also an alcoholic and indeed died in a car wreck where he, visiting novelist Fiswoode Tarlton, and the driver were all drunk.

With that out of the way, I admire much of what he did such as promoting the coming of the Park, working wonders in recording mountain dialect, and being the consummate woodsman. Just to give some indication of the fact I'm not totally opposed to the man, I was the one who nominated him for the American Camping Hall of Fame. But by the same time, as a historian, I'm not about to gild the biographical lily, which is what his descendants and some (though by no means all) writers have done.

Probably far more than you wanted to hear, but I've studied Kephart all my life, own a lot of his personal papers, and have written quite a bit about him. In fact, I have a contract with UT Press right now to edit an anthology of some of his forgotten writings.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Rebelsoul
09-18-2009, 03:38 PM
Jim,
Thank you for the insight on Kephart and I will check out the other sources you mentioned.
As a serious history student of around 50 years,the one thing more than anything else I try to find is the truth insomuch as it still exists.
I have always felt intense pride in being a Southerner with family in TN. since before it became a state.With most in the Western Highland Rim area since the early 1800s.
I can not stand outsiders stereotyping us no matter how much they have been amongst us.
Don't even get me started on the movies and tv depictions of "hillbillies".:mad:
Rick

duckypaddler
09-18-2009, 11:31 PM
I only had 5 minutes on break on my double shift to glance but very impressed with what I saw. I had been waiting for a more in depth book and I'm glad you filled the niche. I'm sure I'll havesome questions in a few days. Those pictures are sweet!

James locke

lauxier
09-19-2009, 11:19 AM
jim:did you know Harry Middleton?

Jim Casada
09-19-2009, 12:25 PM
jim:did you know Harry Middleton?
Lauxier--Yes, I knew Harry quite well and considered him a good friend. I have a folder--probably an inch thick--of correspondence from him. His letters were as appealing as his books. As a fly fisherman he was pretty much inept, but that didn't bother him at all. He loved the Smokies and wrote beautfilly of this special place. Incidentally, I am almost certain that all of the characters in On the Spine of Time are fictional. Jim Casada

Jim Casada
09-21-2009, 03:37 PM
jim:did you know Harry Middleton?
Lauxier--It just occurred to me that I should have mentioned one other thing about Harry Middleton. First editions of all his books are already collector's items, much more so if they are signed by Harry. One limited edition book, The Starlight Creek Angling Society, is porbably worth $1500-$2000 dollars. Jim Casada

WNCFLY
09-23-2009, 01:59 PM
I will admit that I have been against these guide books and have said so many times on here. I have also spoke out against open information sharing on the site, especially when it refers to specks. With that being said I have been reading Jim's book and I am hooked. Its a great read and I really enjoy the history aspect in it. I have a special place in my heart for these streams because my dad and grandpa have fished them their entire life. I believe thats why I get upset when "guide" books are written all the time about them. With Mr Cassada's book I didn't feel the same because it was more about the history and life of the streams than just telling some outsider how to find specks. I am impressed to say the least MR Cassada. Good work.

JohnH0802
09-25-2009, 07:45 AM
Jim,
Just got my copy of your book in when I got home from work yesterday evening. My son had soccer practice, so I have not gotten to spend as much time with the book as I would have liked, but I am already impressed.

Thanks,

JohnH0802

Rebelsoul
09-25-2009, 08:11 AM
I read it every night along with a map of the park...it's a great book,one I know I'm going to use as a reference for years to come.
Thanks again Jim,I also watched your interview on the tv show that's linked from your website,it's good to see you talk and I also learned that I was pronouncing your last name wrong....I said Cuh-sah-duh,it made you sound Eye-tal-yun.....:biggrin:
Rick

Jim Casada
09-25-2009, 09:41 AM
Rick--Thanks, and my name gets mispronounced pretty much on a daily basis. It sounds Italian or Latino, but the family roots are Scotch-Irish. Since you listened to me talk you have to realize I'm as much a product of the mountains as a mess of ramps or poke sallet--plenty of formal education did absolutely nothing to change my mountain accent, something for which I'm thankful.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

WNCFLY
09-25-2009, 11:42 AM
Jim, is this book available in any stores in the Asheville area? I would like to pick up one before the weekend as a gift. Thanks

Jim Casada
09-25-2009, 12:14 PM
Jim, is this book available in any stores in the Asheville area? I would like to pick up one before the weekend as a gift. Thanks
WNCFly--No, the only place the book is presently available, other than through my web site, is at Little River Outfitters. It will eventually be available through other outlets including book stores and purveyors of fly-fishing equipment.

The explanation is pretty simple. I wanted to more or less exhaust the market I could reach directly (I get all of the sales income from those sales) before beginning to wholesale it to other outlets.

Byron and Paula were the sole exception for a very good reason--they were extremely helpful and encouraging in the "lead up" to the book actually appearing in print.

I will be doing a bunch of signings in coming weeks, including a couple in WNC. You can learn about those on my website, www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Jim Casada
09-27-2009, 12:09 PM
I will admit that I have been against these guide books and have said so many times on here. I have also spoke out against open information sharing on the site, especially when it refers to specks. With that being said I have been reading Jim's book and I am hooked. Its a great read and I really enjoy the history aspect in it. I have a special place in my heart for these streams because my dad and grandpa have fished them their entire life. I believe thats why I get upset when "guide" books are written all the time about them. With Mr Cassada's book I didn't feel the same because it was more about the history and life of the streams than just telling some outsider how to find specks. I am impressed to say the least MR Cassada. Good work.
WNCFly--Some of the thoughts in your post go right to the heart of things I agonized over as I prepared the book. Like you, I'm blessed to have had a father and grandfather who fished Park waters (and pre-Park waters too, for that matter). Grandpa, in particular, was loathe to reveal much of anything in the way of favorite fishing holes. "A man's got to have some secrets," he was fond of saying.

In the final analysis I did reveal some secrets, in fact all of them I was aware of to at least a certain degree. But my larger purpose was to give the reader something beyond hard information in the form of an appreciation for the Park's lure, lore, and legacies, all the while attempting to evoke something of a sense of place and a "feel" for the many and varied wonders which make fishing the Park so special.

Thanks for your kind words, and I suspect we are pretty much kindred souls when it comes to our perspective on these storied waters.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Jim Casada
09-29-2009, 11:40 AM
To all who have followed this thread--First of all, thanks to you for the generally warm receiption accorded my book. I put a lot of my heart and soul into it and I hope that it shows in some small degree.

If you've read it you will soon realize I have a keen interest in the history which surrounds places in the Park and the people who once lived there. I have an equally strong, indeed if possible stronger, interest in those who have figured prominently in the evolution of fly fishing in the Park. I devote considerable attention to old-timers who called these storied waters home in the book, but I also realize I've done little more than explore the tailings of a veritable gold mine of information.

With that by way of an introduction, I have a request. I would appreciate it if forum members could point me in the direction of old-timers, especially those who tied flies but just simple fishermen as well, who really knew the Park and spent a great deal of time there. I'm particularly interested in deceased individuals--folks like Fred and Allene Hall, Frank Young, Mark Cathey, and others I mention--but would also like to learn of living legends.

Someday I hope to do a book dealing with several aspects of the Park's history--great hikers and their books, the folks who had to leave and those few (like the Walker sisters and some in Cataloochee) who stayed, pioneers like George Masa and Horace Kephart, and a section on fishermen and fly tiers.
Any help would be much appreciated.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

AKSkim
12-12-2009, 11:32 AM
Mr. Casada:


I received my hard copy of your book, thank you very much for the inscription.

The first thing I noticed when I opened the box was the weight of the book, high quality pages that you don't see very much any more.

Even though I have had it only a couple of days I have not been able to put it down.

I found Appendix 3 by Don Casada very unique and very informative.


Again thank you.

Dennis