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tjw37909
11-17-2009, 06:15 AM
I have worked all night and am getting ready to run over to Cherokee and try to land a monster. I will either get on here later and post some good pics of a big fish, or I will get on here later with plenty of prefabricated excuses about the water temp, the weather, the crowd of people, or someting else I usually say when I just flat out can't catch a dang fish.

JohnH0802
11-17-2009, 10:21 AM
Well good luck, and we look forward to some good pictures, or good fish stories.

tjw37909
11-17-2009, 09:09 PM
Well I caught twelve out of the catch and release section. 14 if you count the 2 I caught on a Dave's Hopper I threw out when two guys from the school across the road came over and threw in a bunch of biscuits that the trout were eating like crazy. I just threw the hopper in the middle of the bread crumbs and waited for the line totighten, but I told the guys I had to go because that was cheating. Biggest was a 16 inch rainbow, but I only took pics of the brookies and a brown. I will put up some pics in a few minutes.

tjw37909
11-17-2009, 09:32 PM
First fish of the day
http://i979.photobucket.com/albums/ae277/tjw37909/PB165104.jpg
2nd fish of the day. same hole
http://i979.photobucket.com/albums/ae277/tjw37909/PB165106.jpg
3rd fish of the day
http://i979.photobucket.com/albums/ae277/tjw37909/PB165107.jpg
Another Brookie. They loved the ugly streamer I tied from just peacock herl and white bucktail
http://i979.photobucket.com/albums/ae277/tjw37909/PB175110.jpg
http://i979.photobucket.com/albums/ae277/tjw37909/PB175113.jpg
And here is my only Brown of the day. 3rd brown ever for me.
http://i979.photobucket.com/albums/ae277/tjw37909/PB175115.jpg
I didn't take any rainbow pics but caught several in 14 inch range. Still want to hook one of those huge ones though

JohnH0802
11-18-2009, 12:05 AM
Great looking fish, I would say that would count as a great day of fishing. Thanks for posting the pictures.

flyred06
11-18-2009, 12:16 AM
Those are some really nice fish....congrats on the catches.

foureyes
11-18-2009, 12:25 AM
great pics!!

I'm heading out that way for the first time this weekend. Hope I have some of the same luck you had.

What flies did you have luck with today? Which did you have no luck?

Rebelsoul
11-18-2009, 09:30 AM
Man,those are pretty!
I bet it was fun.

tjw37909
11-18-2009, 10:38 AM
Thanks guys. I tried double nymphs, and I tries streamers, but I did best when I used a tungsten head prince with a white bucktail streamer about a foot befind it. The biggest rainbow took a tungsten hotwire prince, a couple rainbows took the normal tunsten prince, but the brookies, the brown, and most of the bows took the streamer and they took it hard. If you look back a few days I posted some pics of a golden I caught over there, and it took the same streamer. I just started tying flies a month ago, and it is a streamer I tied. Not sure what it is called, but it looks similar to a Mickey Finn streamer except it is white instead of yellow. If the water stays fishable I am going back Thursday.

Bran
11-18-2009, 11:13 AM
Great report and nice pics of the fish. Good luck Thursday!!

tjw37909
11-18-2009, 11:28 AM
Thank you Bran

billyspey
11-19-2009, 07:38 AM
pretty fish, what fly to use? dough ball, i just don't get it!!!!!! this is fishing out of a fish bowl.

Varmitcounty
11-19-2009, 02:45 PM
Try catching a trout out of said fishbowl......not as easy as if they were in a barrel.

tjw37909
11-19-2009, 05:29 PM
Yes there are plenty of fish in there and yes they are stocked, but they are not that easy to catch. It is tough wading and tough fishing. They have been caught and released so many times that they are very wary. I caught these on a nymph and streamer rig.

Carolina Boy
11-19-2009, 09:34 PM
For what it's worth it is pretty water, has huge fish, and is an easier wade for those who can't get in the rough country, additionally it offers the opportunity to catch the biggest trout of your life for $7 bucks versus 4-5 hundred in places like Blackhawk N. Ga, But here is the interesting part, Trout unlimted offers the Davidson as a top 100 stream, and it is the exact same thing so although i do not look at this strech as a challenge I think it offers a unique experience

foureyes
11-19-2009, 10:58 PM
Yes there are plenty of fish in there and yes they are stocked, but they are not that easy to catch. It is tough wading and tough fishing. They have been caught and released so many times that they are very wary. I caught these on a nymph and streamer rig.

How do you fish the nymph and streamer rig?? Cast upstream and dead-drift or do you strip it in??

I'm making my first trip to Cherokee this weekend and looking for tips.

tjw37909
11-19-2009, 11:02 PM
Ihave been fishing it dead drifted and got several fish that way, but the bigger fish have hit when at the end of the drift when I let it swing across good. I have been fishing a tunsten prince followed by a streamer i tied from just white bucktail and peacock herl with a red thread body. There are probably other patterns that work better(heard a muddler minnow does) but I can't tie those well yet.

tjw37909
11-19-2009, 11:06 PM
Oh I forgot, I went back today. The guy I went with caught 9, and I caught 5. He landed a 19 and a half inch, fat, hook jawed rainbow, and I had a brown that was considerably larger than that until I found out it wouldnt fit in the net. After a 200yd fight running downstream, I got it on top of the net, it was too big to go in, flopped off and ran me right around a rock never to be seen again. I know, I know....the one that fot away. Typical fisherman haha

Carolina Boy
11-19-2009, 11:27 PM
Hey 4-eyes I may wander over there this weekend U fishing Sat?

foureyes
11-19-2009, 11:52 PM
I'm driving up with my buddy Saturday evening, but won't be fishing til Sunday. If your around give me a holler, I drive a silver 07 Xterra.

hillbillydave
11-25-2009, 10:46 AM
I'm driving up with my buddy Saturday evening, but won't be fishing til Sunday. If your around give me a holler, I drive a silver 07 Xterra.



Is anybody fishing next week over in cherokee,sounds like the weather is gona be raining mon.- thur but already scheduled to be there from thur nite thur sat or sun any advice on where or how.

Jim Casada
11-25-2009, 02:48 PM
Varmitcountry--Like you, I'm not overly enamored of dough bellies (what the old mountain folks call hatchery trout). Interestingly, I fished the stretch of Raven Fork which is now part of the Cherokee catch-and-release program untold times as a boy. It used to be in the Park, and the trading of that land and section of river for another part of what was the Reservation was a travesty of political correctness I find unforgiveable.

That being said, lower Raven Fork is about as pretty in terms of physical apperance as a fly fisherman could want, and amidst all those dough bellies it carries wild fish as well. I actually consider it a blessing in some ways, because just a few hundred yards away you've got Luftee (in the Park), a fine brown trout stream in its lower Park reaches which almost certainly has reduced pressure as a result of the Cherokee initative. In fact, I suspect the Park in general in that area will see fewer fishermen as a result of this program.

Finally, I have no doubt there's some degree of difficulty in catching these fish, but they aren't terribly difficult or the program would soon lose its appeal. My view is that it takes different things to please different people. I happen to be partial to wild trout, but if soap heads (another moniker for hatchery fish) bring you joy, that's a grand thing. You are still fly fishing and providing business for operations like Little River Outfitters.

Jim Casada

www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Scott Spencer
11-25-2009, 03:50 PM
That being said, lower Raven Fork is about as pretty in terms of physical apperance as a fly fisherman could want, and amidst all those dough bellies it carries wild fish as well. I actually consider it a blessing in some ways, because just a few hundred yards away you've got Luftee (in the Park), a fine brown trout stream in its lower Park reaches which almost certainly has reduced pressure as a result of the Cherokee initative. In fact, I suspect the Park in general in that area will see fewer fishermen as a result of this program.Mr Casada - I am hoping my wife gives me your book for Christmas but I was wondering if there is a really good map you would recommend for this area? I have never fished this area and online searches aren't producing a lot of detail and information for me. Especially since I don't know what I am looking at or what to look for. Would you recommend a standard DeLorme map book as my best bet or is there something else? I would just hate to spend hours driving and many dollars on a trip to the area and literally have no idea where to even begin fishing or where to go. The Cherokee website doesn't show a lot of information/maps either (unless I have overlooked it).

Thanks!!

Jim Casada
11-25-2009, 05:19 PM
Scott--There's a map in my book (a removable fold-out which shows all streams, trails, and backcountry campsites) and I highly recommend ownership of the DeLorme Atlas for both N. C. and Tennessee. If you want more depth, JoeFred (on this forum) is in the process of doing some wonderfully detailed maps for Park waters, and he has completed the one for the Oconaluftee drainage.
Beyond that, a lot of water in this area is available right at roadside. Luftee parallels Highway 441 for many miles; Bradley Fork is accessible at the Smokemont Campground just off 441; Straight Fork can be acessed off the Big Cove Road (which is off 441); to get to Kephart Prong just park along 441 and hike a very short way; Collins Creek, Mingus Creek, and Kanati Fork all literally flow under 441 to enter Luftee.
Hopefully that will help a bit, but check out JoeFred's efforts and you can also visit the Park website to see the trail/stream map.
Jim Casada

tennswede
11-25-2009, 07:57 PM
[QUOTE=Jim Casada;74469]Varmitcountry--Like you, I'm not overly enamored of dough bellies (what the old mountain folks call hatchery trout). Interestingly, I fished the stretch of Raven Fork which is now part of the Cherokee catch-and-release program untold times as a boy. It used to be in the Park, and the trading of that land and section of river for another part of what was the Reservation was a travesty of political correctness I find unforgiveable.

I for one disagree with above statement. I don't see anyhing wrong with hatchery fish. I applaud what the Native Americans have done. It is a very interesting and fun place to fish and it is in no way as easy as some self proclaimed experts would like you to believe. I think it's derogatory to keep referring to dough bellies. So what! how about letting someone enjoy something fun for a change. I don't know if Mr. Casada realizes it. but he sounds bitter in my book. Yes I bought your book, and yes I realize your are a fine fisherman, and outdoors man but why always the need to turn every post in to a negative. As for the park swap, no problem with that either. In fact fishing is great on said spot.

Jim Casada
11-25-2009, 09:05 PM
Hans--I don't believe you are being fair to me. I'm interested in this forum as a source of information interchange rather than as a place of controversy. That's why I participate, and I endeavor to do so in a genteel and gentlemanly fashion. For some reason I seem to be a burr under your mental saddle, and that troubles me. I'm about as easygoing a guy as you are ever likely to encounter. As a journalist, I try to address topics in a fair and forthright fashion, and as someone who deeply cares for the Smokies and has roots there ranging back for generations, I am passionate about the fisheries.

In the posting you reference, I attempted, although obviously without success from your perspective, to indicate that it was fine with me if others enjoyed the fishing on the Cherokee waters. Indeed, and in my defense, I have written, and written quite positively, about the appeal of the fishery. So when you suggest that I let others have some fun, I've actually gone several steps beyond that. I've brought the opportunities to have that fun to the attention of readers of several publications. Robert Blankenship, who manages the Cherokee hatchery, would readily vouch for the positive impact that a piece I did on the program shortly after its inception (it appeared in "The Angling Report") had in terms of visitors and favorable publicity. Robert and I have talked about ways to fine-tune and improve the program by phone and, more recently, at the WNC Fly Fishing Expo. In fact, he has directly sought my input and advice on some steps which might make a thriving program even more successful. I've also written about the fishery in magazines and newspapers. So to suggest that I don't support it is inaccurate. I've done so, in person and in print.

It's just that for me personally, and in my post that was what I attempted to make abundantly manifest. I prefer to fish for wild trout. I actually went back and read my post to be doubly sure, and what I said was that the tribal fishery pleased me because it probably eased the pressure elsewhere.

As for references to dough bellies and soap heads, obviously you find that offensive. They are just terms I've heard old-time mountain folks use all my years, and far be it from me to deny my roots and eschew my raising.

I am not a "self-ordained expert," even though you subsequently refer to me as a fine fisherman. You can't know because you've never seen me fish. Others tell me I'm a decent hand with a fly rod and when it comes to catching trout on streams in the Smokies. However, I've known (and still know) many anglers who are far more adept than me. Where I am confident is in my background, which spans some 60 years of fishing the Park, in my knowledge of the area's history (I have a Ph. D. in history and studied at a fine institution in Tennessee, Vanderbilt University), in my passion for the area, and in my eagerness to share whatever knowledge I possess with others. That's the primary reason I've taught fly fishing in the University of Tennessee's Smoky Mountain Field School for some two decades. Please re-read my comments--I clearly state that it is a grand thing for anyone to fly fish, no matter whether for hatchery-raised trout or wild ones, and I further indicate that different approaches appeal to different folks.

My final plea to you would be to maintain civil discourse, and if I have failed to do so shame on me. I believe a fair reading of the posting which raised your hackles will reveal I intended to be civil, and maybe I should have just ignored your post suggesting otherwise.

Happy Thanksgiving, and surely we can agree that those of us who fish Park waters have a great deal for which to be thankful. In that regard, I'm anything but bitter. I'm blessed, and you are as well.

Jim Casada

P. S. As for the land swap, that's one subject where I won't yield one iota. I don't know how much you know about the background to the swap, and it's fine if you have no problems with it. I do (or did, since it is now a fait accompli). I was in good company in my objections, because a bevy of environmentalists, archaeologists, historians, and others found it a travesty. That was stated, with solid scientific support and great eloquence, in a number of public hearings. On top of all that, the swap was decidedly uneven--prime bottom land of great significance in exchange for acreage which is basically steep cliffs, practically unreachable, and of no ecological or other significance. That's hardly an equitable exchange, and most anyone in the area (including tribal members) will readily attest to the fact that politics was involved. Nor did the tribal authorities want the land because of its historical significance (which is considerable). It was wanted for and used to build a state-of-the-art education facility. That's a great thing and as an educator let me assure you it is a singularly impressive facility. On the other hand, the underlying argument for the land swap about needing the site for the school rang hollow indeed. The Eastern Band had quite suitable land near where Harrah's Casino is situated. It seems just possible that land was deemed unsuitable for pecuniary reasons. Methinks it not only possible but highly likely. Money talks.

tennswede
11-25-2009, 09:35 PM
Mr. Casada.

I know of your accomplishments and I knew of you already in my second year in TN. I loved Trout South and that's where I encountered your writings for the first time. I still can't help but feel that you come across as somewhat negative about others viewpoints and theories. That is your right and I can live with it. I guess I have felt somewhat that your opinionated personality gets the best of you at times. It seems to me that every post you make has to have some kind of political or supercharged opinion in it. Let's just agree to disagree and leave it at that. I don't doubt that you know a lot of stuff and you have clout as a local. I just don't understand when someone has to always "toot their own horn". You might not mean it that way but that's the way I interpret it. I am by no means perfect so I might just put too much in to this.

Forgive me if I offended you I just needed to express my opinion as you are always expressing yours. As for the tribe and their doings. I have no problems with it. I can understand why it might bother you more than me. After all I'm not a native of these parts but I do love these mountains and I can understand that someone born and raised here have different views on certain things.

As for as dough bellies and other terms. In my opinion, just because grandpa used those terms and that is your heritage, it doesn't make it any more classy. I don't necessarily think just because we were raised a certain way, it's is the only right way. Just because something is vintage, it doesn't always equal quality.


As for your educational achievement. I am familiar with those also and respect those. I guess I am even more appalled that someone with such a degree of education is continuing the rant with dough bellies and other peculiar wordings. I find it very funny to hear that you are a firm supporter and advocate of the tribal fishery but has to tell someone in a post that it's dough bellies. You are contradictory in my opinion.

In conclusion, in no way do I harbor any anger toward you, I'm just not in agreement with you. I'm sorry to hear that you think I am unfair. I do apologize for making you feel that way. Everything is cool and the sun will rise tomorrow regardless. Happy Thanksgiving and tight lines.

ChemEAngler
11-25-2009, 10:31 PM
HBDave,

I was over there today, and it was beautiful. The water looked great, and it was virtually deserted. Only landed one average bow after 2.5 hrs fishing. I couldn't finish the deal on a couple of big ones including a large palomino that rose to my yellow stimulator. I just don't have enough experience fishing on the smaller waters. I am a tailwater guy, and it shows when I go to the mountains.

Talked to two other guys, and they each had landed a couple after fishing all afternoon. It was a good day though. While driving back home I was two bull elk and a bear along Newfound Gap Rd.

hillbillydave
11-25-2009, 11:17 PM
ChemEAngler thanks for the reply , if I might ask what where you fishing ,nymphs I would think but would like some info for my trip next week .Want to fish the trophy section but always hords of people there so I usually always go to some of my fav spots just outside of the boundry back into the park where it's quiet , the fish are smaller but more of an accomplishment when you catch the wild browns and brookies.

hillbillydave

hillbillydave
11-25-2009, 11:21 PM
sorry missed the yel stimulator part :redface:


HBdave

tjw37909
11-26-2009, 12:22 AM
ChemEAngler, I was there today, and only managed one fish, but it was in about 6 hours fishing. By the end of the day I was kinda down, making sloppy casts and just knowing I needed to leave even though I could't leave "the big" one in there. I caught an 18 inch rainbow within 15 minutes of fishing, and never got another bite. I threw every nymph and streamer I had. I am sure my skill level can take partial blame for my lack of fish though. My overall biggest fish(to net) came outside the trophy section over there.

JohnH0802
11-26-2009, 09:30 AM
Jim,
I enjoy all of your posts, and enjoyed these as well. I personally do not think that you come off as some type of purist, shaking your nose at the commoners catching the hatchery fish, but that is just my opinion.

On the topic of the land swap I disagree in principle. I will say up front that I do not know any of the history of the land swap, and know none of the politics for why it was done. The thing that I do know is that the Indians, throughout our history, have tended to get the short end of the stick. For this reason, I don't mind seeing Indian tribes making money of gambling, I say more power to them. If they can take land that most times was considered as non-prime land (although the land may be considered prime now), and use it to make a living then more power to them. If they got over on us on this land swap, then more power to them on that score too! Please do not get me wrong, I think that the land is beautiful, and would have loved to see it as part of the park too, and if the situation was different, i.e. the land was traded to some wealth developer, I would agree with you.

Anyway, just my two cents. I personally enjoy fishing for wild fish in park waters and elsewhere, as well as fishing hatchery supported waters. The each have their own unique charm.

Happy Thanksgiving to all, may you all have a wonderful day of thanks. I personally am thankful for all of my family and loved ones as well as all of the wonderful places that I have had the opportunity to see and explore. I am also thankful to have the opportunity to correspond and share ideas and thoughts with so many experienced and intelligent people on this board. Thanks to all for their input and thoughts.

Jim Casada
11-26-2009, 10:20 AM
John--Thanks. I have no problem with the casion, although it will never get a penny of my money, and I actually applaud the tribe for using large amounts of money to acquire prime land throughout the area. As one local put it, in apt fashion, the huge amounts of money they are making at the casino is a form of "the red man's revenge."
My problem with the land swap is that the land which was part of the Park, which belongs to all the nation, was suddenly swapped in a deal anyone who examines it will have to conclude was singularly one-sided. It was a lovely piece of bottom land, easily accessed (it is situated at and just above the juncture of Raven Fork and Luftee) with considerable biological and archaelogical significance. In exchange the Park got very inaccessible land worth nothing in terms of human enjoyment of natural wonders or from an ecological standpoint.
Maybe I'm just too close to the situation, but I would add that most everyone in the environmental community, as well as the Park support groups, found the swap extremely troubling.

It's history now, although there is one other element I haven't mentioned. In the aftermath of the land swap the Park yielded public rights of access to a mighty fine stretch of wild trout water. It is now part of the Tribal catch-and-release waters, so the Cherokees benefitted in that regard as well. As to how fishermen fared, it depends on whether you prefer wild trout or pay to fish hatchery-supported waters. For me it was a loss; for others and certainly for the Cherokee economy, a huge gain.

Jim Casada
Jim Casada

JohnH0802
11-26-2009, 11:08 AM
Jim,
That was my point exactly....that if the Tribe got a one-sided win with the history they have had in this country for getting the shorter end of the stick, then good on them. It is about time they got the better end of the deal. Don't get me wrong, I do understand your point, and agree that it was a loss to the nation as a whole. I may not even agree with how the tribe uses it in total, but I cannot bring myself to begrudge the fact that they got over for once.

I agree with you that it was a loss, 100%. I also conceede that the land belonged to the Indian Nation long before it belonged to ours. I mourn the loss to us, while at the same time celebrate that the Indian's have been the benefactor for a change.

You have a wonderful Thanksgiving, and again thank you for all of your wisdom, experience, and insight that you so readily share with the rest of us. I think you in yourself are a treasure of the Smokies.

John

ChemEAngler
11-26-2009, 01:52 PM
ChemEAngler, I was there today, and only managed one fish, but it was in about 6 hours fishing. By the end of the day I was kinda down, making sloppy casts and just knowing I needed to leave even though I could't leave "the big" one in there. I caught an 18 inch rainbow within 15 minutes of fishing, and never got another bite. I threw every nymph and streamer I had. I am sure my skill level can take partial blame for my lack of fish though. My overall biggest fish(to net) came outside the trophy section over there.

TJW,

I hear ya. I threw every nymph pattern I had at them with 2 or 3 splitshot to get to the bottom quickly, and they never touched it. I switched to a yellow stimi when I saw a large palomino surface feeding. I missed it and another average bow on the stimi. Finally before leaving I switched to an olive/black woolly bugger and that is what I caught my fish on.

hillbillydave
11-26-2009, 08:45 PM
Jim & John I see and under stand both sides of the views on this topic and agree with both sides but I have to lean more to Johns side of view and look at it as the cherokee just got back what originally belonged to them in the first place,yes it is a lose as far as a prime wild trout stretch of water but on the same note is almost inaccessible due to the commercialasation of the location being that cherokee is a tourist resort kind of location. What we should be more concerned with is the " corn fisherman " themselves as they do more damage than most of us " purist "
combined. Point at hand was there earlier this year on opening weekend and had a pool that I love to fish ,have always caught fish in this pool be it wild or stockers , there was agroup or family fishing this pool ,so I watched it all day ever time I came by they were there fishing no problem. Later in the day they had gone so I stopped to fish it ,walked to the edge of the river and found they had left all their trash and the remnets of the fish they had caught and cleaned and thrown back into the river, as mad as it made me I still set out to fish the pool so I proceded to get geared up and fish the pool , no sooner had I geared and rigged and got into the water they returned and proceded to barge right on in on top of me and proceded to fish again without remorse or respect for someone else there fishing and you as a flyfisherman knows it is impossible to fish with bait slingers throwing in ,on and all around you so I was the one that regretfully and grudfully left. So I guess my point being is not to be upset as much with the politics of the matter as you should be with the people that abuse the natural beauty and pristine surroundings of this magnificent resourse just like the rich developers that are cutting these mountains up and putting in communities and developments all in these mountains. Jim I didn't grow up persay in these mountains but being a south carolina boy I have spent my years coming here since I was just a wee lad with my grandparents and on my own as I got older and I can say that I dont think there is a local that loves these mountains more than I do and it saddens me to see whats happening to them and it being called "progress". I have been a viewer of this site for a few years but not much of a " blogger " persay so I hope not to have offended or upset anyone . There are a lot of well educated and fine people here and enjoy the reading and info I get from here .That being said hope every one has a safe and Happy Thanksgiving .

hillbillydave

p.s. tightlines

Jim Casada
11-26-2009, 08:56 PM
Hillbillydave--I share your extreme frustration with people who trash water or land. They are themselves trash. Obviously the situation you talk about was outside the Park and did not involve the catch-and-release Cherokee water, since in the case of the Park there is no opening day and in the case of both use of corn is verboten.

What you observed is something which absolutely frosts my grits, and although I'm normally pretty soft-spoken and even reclusive when it comes to fishing, on more than one occasion I guess I've invited trouble by saying something to folks who were trashing the good earth.

You are right that most fly fishermen fall outside this shameful mold, and for that we can certainly be thankful.

Obviously you've learned to love the Smokies, but I'm more blessed. Why, you might ask. Simply because I was, by sheer accident of birth, born there. I didn't realize it as a boy, but increasingly with each passing year I know that mine was an extremely fortunate youth. Few indeed are those who live within walking distance of a fine trout stream, have mentors aplenty to teach them, have parents who tolerate a fly-fishing fool, and who enjoy the good fortune of long and loving links with the Smokies. Incidentally, I would also point out the fact that there is a difference between being OF the Smokies and IN the Smokies. It is elusive, effervescent, and maybe even indefinable, but it exists. Just ask any son or daughter of the Smokies (as I did at my last high school reunion) and they will tell you that lying deep within the depths of their innermost being is an abiding love of place which comes from coming of age in that place.

That's enough of a philosophical bent, but I hope it suggests that the general tenor or your post is something I've given a great deal of thought to over the years.

Jim Casada

hillbillydave
11-26-2009, 09:39 PM
Hillbillydave--I share your extreme frustration with people who trash water or land. They are themselves trash. Obviously the situation you talk about was outside the Park and did not involve the catch-and-release Cherokee water, since in the case of the Park there is no opening day and in the case of both use of corn is verboten.

What you observed is something which absolutely frosts my grits, and although I'm normally pretty soft-spoken and even reclusive when it comes to fishing, on more than one occasion I guess I've invited trouble by saying something to folks who were trashing the good earth.

You are right that most fly fishermen fall outside this shameful mold, and for that we can certainly be thankful.

Obviously you've learned to love the Smokies, but I'm more blessed. Why, you might ask. Simply because I was, by sheer accident of birth, born there. I didn't realize it as a boy, but increasingly with each passing year I know that mine was an extremely fortunate youth. Few indeed are those who live within walking distance of a fine trout stream, have mentors aplenty to teach them, have parents who tolerate a fly-fishing fool, and who enjoy the good fortune of long and loving links with the Smokies. Incidentally, I would also point out the fact that there is a difference between being OF the Smokies and IN the Smokies. It is elusive, effervescent, and maybe even indefinable, but it exists. Just ask any son or daughter of the Smokies (as I did at my last high school reunion) and they will tell you that lying deep within the depths of their innermost being is an abiding love of place which comes from coming of age in that place.

That's enough of a philosophical bent, but I hope it suggests that the general tenor or your post is something I've given a great deal of thought to over the years.

Jim Casada


Jim , I didn't mean that they were accually fishing with corn just my discription of bait fisherman fishing for stockers ,and no it wasnt in the park it was in the boundry , being of mature age I dont get as far off the beaten path as I use to so have to stick to easier access but still love it just as much just have to work a little harder for the wild trout that every one else has caught already as I dont keep a single fish that I catch in the park on the other hand the ones I catch in the boundry well ...thats a different story. There's nothing more gradiffing than to catch a wild Smokey Mountain trout on a fly that you tye yourself and fool those willey little devils. I've got some holes that I fish everytime I come and have caught some of the same trout more than once . Please forgive me if I dont disclose the locations to specificly as they are roadside locations but not a lot of pressure so would like to keep them that way.

hillbillydave

tjw37909
11-26-2009, 11:09 PM
Chem, I caught my bow at the slow end of a hole on a white bucktail streamer as it swung across. Made for a long day catching one that early and getting my hopes up. I think I will give it a shot again one day next week before packing up the fly rod and breaking out the hiking boots for the winter. The cold weather should give me plenty of time to work on my fly tying that I am trying to learn.