PDA

View Full Version : Elk Report 12/1


wm1miller
12-02-2009, 01:16 PM
I had planned to fish the Caney on Monday but the generating schedule sent me to the Elk instead.
I had an OK day; as far as number of fish. (Every day on the river is a good day).
All of my fish were rainbows and under 10", a couple way under, like 7".
Again, I did not find anything that consistently caught fish.
I did catch a few fish on each of the following: Chartreuse Wooly Bugger; Tan Scud; Soft Hackle; Zebra Midge. (And for the first time, maybe ever, did not catch any on an Olive Wooly Bugger).
There was a good hatch of, pardon my lack of scientific names, gnat like bugs. They were very small, like smaller than #28. They were black with clear colored wings. Rises were off and on all afternoon; primarily in shallow water in and around the shoals. Apparently all small fish. I fished a #24 midge that matched the color, trailing a larger dry fly and could not get them to take it. I talked to another gentleman that said that he matched the bugs perfectly and could not get them to take it either.
I am making it a goal is to learn to fish this kind of hatch. I believe that I could have caught a lot of fish if I had known how to approach it.
Other fly fishers had about the same kind of day that I had. One gentleman that counts caught twenty.
A couple of bait casters that were also fishing could not limit.
Don't know if you would call this report positive or negative, but it is the way it is.
In my opinion, still a great place to spend a fall/winter afternoon.
William

silvercreek
12-02-2009, 01:28 PM
Sounds like that infernal bug I started seeing on the Caney. They do not have an elongated body like a gnat, more shaped like a fruit fly but small. The ones I have seen look like a small bead on the water as they try to unfurl their wings. They also have short legs compared to a gnat. Does that sound like what you saw? My midge pattern does not work for this fly. I've got a new one for this fly, but the lack of activity on the Caney and now generation has kept me from trying it. Anyway, at least you had some opportunity and caught some fish. Regards, Silvercreek

wm1miller
12-02-2009, 03:40 PM
Yes, sounds like the same bug. And, they buzz like a fly. I know, I had one get in my ear.
Let us know how your new pattern works.
Hopefully, you will get to try it soon.
Regards,
William

Shaggy
12-02-2009, 07:17 PM
I agree about the Olive Wolly Bugger, absolutely my go to fly when all else fails. I don't even know what the fish think it is, but they sure love to attack them.

Anybody know what an Wolly Bugger is imitating? I've heard that it imitates a hellgramite but wasnt so sure about this. Whatever the case, I always tie a good supply of them.

Nice Report!

bones
12-02-2009, 08:39 PM
We have the same bug on the Cumberland. The ones in the winter are black and between a #24-#30 and the ones in the summer are grey and #22. Try a ICSI midge dressed for color and size when they are out.

wm1miller
12-03-2009, 11:43 AM
{Anybody know what an Wolly Bugger is imitating?}
Shaggy,
The answer to your question depends on who you ask and how they fish it.
Some will tell you a bait fish and fish it like a streamer.
Others will say leeches or aquatic worms and fish them center weighted.
Hellgrammites or crayfish is probably what comes to mind for most people and they fish them front weighted.
Maybe it's just an attractor pattern.
I don't have a clue what the fish think, but, like you, I know that the fish like them; bass and bluegill as well as trout.
I enjoy fishing the wooly bugger because there are so many ways to fish it: Dead drift, bottom bounce, jig, fast strip, crawl and swing.
I think that the "breathing" action of the marabou along with the bouncing and darting motion is more than a fish can resist.
I never go to a stream without a few.
Regards,
William
Bones, thanks for your input. I checked out the I.C.S.I. midge and will have to see if I can tie some small enough.
Regards,
William

silvercreek
12-03-2009, 11:54 AM
William, just a thought. I'd keep the hackle on that ICSI a bit smaller than usual. These funny bugs seem to have short legs compared to the usual midge. If trout are keying in on those dimples in the film caused by the legs, they are going to be small. I could be totally wrong. Maybe hedge your bet and tie it both ways. Let us know how it works. Maybe I'll go to Priest Monday and mess around with the fresh stockers. Just 10 minutes away. Regards, Silvercreek

wm1miller
12-03-2009, 01:27 PM
Silvercreek,
Will do. Yes, I think the smaller, the better.
Thanks for the advice.
William