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lauxier
01-06-2010, 10:28 AM
bought a couple of farm raised trout at the grocery-fried them as usual--they were not worth eating,threw them out...maybe i'm wrong.but wild trout out of cold water is about as good as fish can get,they taste 100X better than farm raised trout .Fish caught in the park make for great eating,you'd think if you eat one trout you'd pretty much tasted them all,but I don't think that's the case here,is it...enviroment?no commercial feed?clean,not mud bottomed pond water?.....

Jim Casada
01-06-2010, 10:38 AM
Lauxier--A wild trout of seven inches or slightly larger, freshly caught and properly kitted out in a cornmeal dinner jacket, is a culinary thing of joy forever; something to bring tears of pure joy to a mountain gourmet. It's also heartening to know, as one eats fish, that keeping a limit in most Park waters actually does the fish a favor. Most Park streams are overpopulated, thanks in part to a rather meager food base.

As for those hatchery-raised fish, they are culinary abominations. Most of all, I'm just relieved to find someone else of what my late mother referred to as the "release to grease" persuasion.

Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

flyman
01-06-2010, 10:44 AM
Specs are my favorite trout:biggrin: Nothing fancy, just lightly breaded and cooked to a crisp.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y166/flyman1/fishing%20and%20misc%20flies/untitled.jpg

Rog 1
01-06-2010, 02:16 PM
Jim...you are a man after my own heart. My grandfather and uncle fished the Park waters and always brought home what they caught. Have many fond memories of my grandmother placing a platter of those sweet fish on the table to be enjoyed. Once I got old enough to join in the fun I too practiced this time honored tradition of catch and release. I can now only make one or two trips a year to the mountains but while camping there is at least one night when we invite some of the stream locals to dinner. One summer my young son wanted to fish for the stockers in Gburg on our way home from fishing in the Park and he managed to catch a 12in bow which we cleaned along side an 11" wild bow from LR...looking at the fish side by side was amazing...the color of the flesh--pink vs. gray--the color of the organs--clear vs. clouded-- and the ultimate taste test...a wild trout has a natural diet, clean water and the overall environment that produces a superior specimen over those pond creatures raised on "pig pellets".

lauxier
01-06-2010, 03:08 PM
jim-chef paul purdhomme(sp?) of K Pauls restaurant in new orleans fries the best trout known to me,his recipe:fresh wild trout rolled in equal parts yellow cornmeal,and pecan meal(pecans ground into a meal somewhat like course cornmeal)salt,pepper,then fried in peanut oil in a black cast iron skillet...so good it should be a sin to eat it

lauxier
01-06-2010, 03:19 PM
my bride just asked me where chef paul got wild trout in new orleans,and just when i had visited new orleans,so as to have eaten at chef pauls restaurant,in order to have so much knowledge about this culinary masterpiece.....this recipe came out of Chef Pauls" Louisiana Cooking" cook book..I have not been to New Orleans,and would never go to New Orleans unless my wonderful wife accompanied me----Whew..

jeffnles1
01-06-2010, 04:10 PM
You guys are killing me! You're making me want to put my parka on, go chop a hole through the ice and try to catch a fish dip it in a mixture of corn and pecan meal and fry it up in peanut oil in a cast iron skillet.

All I need is a fresh trout (or crappie would do quite nicely as well) and peacan meal. I have the rest of the stuff just waiting.

Jeff

Grannyknot
01-06-2010, 04:13 PM
There is a restaurant in Blowing Rock that advertises "fresh caught wild rainbow trout" on their nightly menu. I always wonder who the lucky sole is that can catch enough 15" wild trout every day to keep it on the menu :biggrin:. I believe they meant to say fresh wild caught rainbow trout.....

...side note....I ordered it once and didn't think the dish met the expectations its price had set. Must have been a pellet feeder.

Rog 1
01-06-2010, 04:48 PM
There used to be a restaurant between Gburg and Greenbrier that served fried rainbow trout....while you waited for your dinner to be prepared you could go out to several cement ponds outside the restaurant and fish for the next persons trout...all that were caught went to the kitchen to be cooked later....kids loved the place...caught fish and went back inside and ate chicken fingers.

Grannyknot
01-06-2010, 05:51 PM
There used to be a restaurant between Gburg and Greenbrier that served fried rainbow trout....while you waited for your dinner to be prepared you could go out to several cement ponds outside the restaurant and fish for the next persons trout...all that were caught went to the kitchen to be cooked later....kids loved the place...caught fish and went back inside and ate chicken fingers.

sounds like the old cross eyed cricket restaurant....I believe it was down towards lenoir city or sweetwater.

sammcdonald
01-06-2010, 06:20 PM
was further out...was teague's mill......burned down...had great ribs too

ZachMatthews
01-06-2010, 07:46 PM
This post is making me hungry. I love the pecan meal idea. To me, nothing goes with trout like sliced potatoes fried right after the fish in the same oil. If you set them aside for a second then re-fry, you can make them beautifully crisp.

Zach

Jim Casada
01-06-2010, 08:35 PM
Zach (and Lauxier)--The mixture of pecan bits and yellow cornmeal (the latter should be stone ground, I might note) is one I find really appealing. Although it has little to do with this forum as a rule, one of my consuming (pun intended) interests is food. My wife and I have written a bunch of cookbooks, all of them on wild foods (game, fish, and things like nuts and berries), and anyone who knows me personally will readily acknowledge my profile suits my love of food. Suffice it to say I'm unlikely to find cover behind a three-quarter-inch water pipe.
As for the taters, here's a tip you might want to consider. To get wonderfully browned pan potatoes, bake the spuds (or cook 'em in a microwave) before hitting the trail. They'll be fine for the first night's meal. Just slice them up, add a bit of streaked meat to the frying pan, let the meat start to sizzling good, the add the potatoes. They will rbown nicely, and if you like them a bit crispy, slice them then before putting them in the pan.
To me the ultimate Smoky Mountain backcountry meal features the following: Pan-fried trout, a ramp and branch lettuce (saxifrage) salad "kilt" with hot bacon grease and bacon bits (you can use some of the grease for cooking fish as well, fried potatoes fixed as per the above instructions, and cracklin' cornbread. The latter takes a bit of doing, not the least of which is procuring cracklings, but it can be done with a reflecting apparatus and some know-how.
For dessert, you can make a wonderful temptation for the sweet tooth using dried apples, dried peaches, or dried apricots. Soak them in water while you are out fishing, heat, top with crumbled Ritz crackers and brown sugar, dot with a bit of butter, and if desired, sprinkle a bit of rum in at the last moment. The nice thing about this dessert is that it is lightweight and good for backpacking trips, and the same is true of the rest of the meal (you get the fish, ramps, and branch lettuce from nature) except for the potatoes. I'll sacrifice the extra pack weight to have them though.
That's enough, I'm off to the kitchen for a hearty venison and lentil stew featuring ground venison and lentils with a few green chilis mixed in, some diced tomatoes, and a bit more heat from chili powder. Pure pleasure if you are feeling peckish on a cold winter's evening.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

ChemEAngler
01-06-2010, 10:09 PM
There used to be a restaurant between Gburg and Greenbrier that served fried rainbow trout....while you waited for your dinner to be prepared you could go out to several cement ponds outside the restaurant and fish for the next persons trout...all that were caught went to the kitchen to be cooked later....kids loved the place...caught fish and went back inside and ate chicken fingers.

I remember that place. My mom and dad took me there when I was around 5, and it helped fuel the fire burning inside me.

tjw37909
01-06-2010, 11:00 PM
I remember going to Teague Mill a lot when I was a kid. I probably "caught" my first trout there. I wish it was still open, seeing as it would be about 2 and a half miles from my house.

jeffnles1
01-06-2010, 11:19 PM
To me the ultimate Smoky Mountain backcountry meal features the following: Pan-fried trout, a ramp and branch lettuce (saxifrage) salad "kilt" with hot bacon grease and bacon bits

My grandmother used to make something very similar. She called it "wilted" lettuce. She used beacon grease, chopped up the beacon and added a touch of vinegar and sugar to the grease and poured it over the lettuce while the grease was still hot.

It's so bad for you in so many ways, but I always thought it was the food of the gods.

In early spring, she would add dandelion leaves to the lettuce and that added a very nice flavor and texture.

This thread is making me very hungry.

Jeff

ChemEAngler
01-06-2010, 11:30 PM
My grandmother used to make something very similar. She called it "wilted" lettuce. She used beacon grease, chopped up the beacon and added a touch of vinegar and sugar to the grease and poured it over the lettuce while the grease was still hot.

It's so bad for you in so many ways, but I always thought it was the food of the gods.

In early spring, she would add dandelion leaves to the lettuce and that added a very nice flavor and texture.


Jeff,
I still ask my mom and mother-in-law to make it for me every year for my birthday along with fried fish. That reminds me to call them and put in my order for this years birthday dinner coming up this weekend....

silvercreek
01-07-2010, 10:01 AM
This kilt, wilt thing seems to be regional. My folks were from Kentucky and it was called wilt. My Mom always put a little chopped green onion in it. Whatever you call it, it sure tastes gooood. Silvercreek.

Grannyknot
01-07-2010, 10:26 AM
For those of you that are into mountain greens....you should try to attend the Cosby ramp festival.

http://www.cosbyrampfestival.org/

After last years festival, feast, & the 5 following days of eating ramps, I stunk like an early 1900s cades cove school boy in the spring.

Rog 1
01-07-2010, 11:04 AM
One spring I was hiking up above Elkmont to fish above #24 due to high water...passed a couple of local elders with cane poles and overalls....must have had their city cousin with them because he looked like he had stepped off the cover of an Orvis catalog....on the way back out I caught the smell of ramps before I ever saw these same fellows again...as I passed them they were all chewing on fresh ramps with their front pockets stuffed with the fresh dug treasure....doubt if any of them were allowed in the bedroom when they got home.

lauxier
01-07-2010, 05:08 PM
I was raised on a farm in eastern ky.During the summer's, my parents grew a large garden.An average supper in those days was made up of kilt lettuce,green beans,cantalopue,beets,corn on the cobb fried taters and corn bread.This is regional cooking,mountain cooking, country cooking,or whatever you want to call it, it's as good as it gets.Have got a pack of trout layed out thawing,It'll be chef pauls' fried trout,fried taters,cole slaw,andhush puppies for supper tonight(I caught these trout out of little river the summer the water got so low)

lauxier
01-07-2010, 09:23 PM
in th 1950's,me,my sister,and my mom and dad would visit my uncle russell and aunt ann for a week or two in the summer,uncle rus was my dad's brother,i guess they were close,.uncle rus owned a farm,in the wear valley,he raised registered hereford cattle.he worked in knoxville,at UT(a chemistry teacher).these were our set aside vacatindays uncle rus and my dad would fish and squirrel hunt.aunt ann would take the freshly caught trout,lay them in a pan(heads off)(skin on) sqeeze fresh lemon juice on them,lots of lemon juice.she then put the lemoned trout in the refrigerator..she let em marinate for 24 hours,after a day or so(usually sooner)she'dpull them out of the fridg and sprinkle salt and pepper on the trout,she then smoked the trout in a 5 gallon metal can,under hickory coals,it was a smoker contraption from hades,but it worked....we had smoked rainbow trout that fell of the bone,and squirrel..,tender,in squirrel gravy,biscuits,,tomatoes for the gravy,gravy for the biscuits

Mundele
01-08-2010, 05:35 PM
This kilt, wilt thing seems to be regional. My folks were from Kentucky and it was called wilt. My Mom always put a little chopped green onion in it. Whatever you call it, it sure tastes gooood. Silvercreek.


My family called it "kilt" lettuce, same recipe. My wife's family calls it "Wilted" lettuce, same recipe but they add buttermilk. The vinegar curdles the buttermilk. I definitely prefer the "kilt" variety.

hw3
01-08-2010, 06:46 PM
From central Kentucky, edge of the mountains, Montgomery County, and it was always "wilted." Seems the further from the mountains, more likely "wilt" vs. "kilt." Mom from upstate NY, and she took to it like born to it. Skip Watson

ukfb1
01-08-2010, 08:57 PM
Not trying to hijack but can we get some brown beans, cornbread and maybe a dutchoven pineapple upside cake.

Jim Casada
01-09-2010, 10:00 AM
ukfb1--How about a big pot of pinto beans, or better still, October beans, cooked with a hefty chunk of fatback (streaked meat, side meat) or a ham hock? As for the cornbread, as I've already suggested I believe (since I talk about foodstuffs at some length in my January e-newsletter--shameless promotion, you can sign up to get it free by visiting my website--it may have been that I have in mind rather than this forum) that there's nothing quite like cracklin' cornbread. I'm probably not the only one here who has been part of raising hogs, butchering hogs, and rendering the lard. The latter is what produces the cracklings, and they give a pone of cornbread a college education.
Speaking of hogs, to my way of thinking you'll go a long way to find a dish that beats backbones-and-ribs cooked to the point where you can suck the marrow out of the rib bones. Also, maybe it's time for a quiz, since it is certainly too cold for anyone even to think about being astream.
Hogs will eat most anything, from oak mast to mushrooms, cushaws to candy roasters, pumpkins to red-rooted pig weed. They even roamed "No Man's Land" between the trenches in World War I and ate the flesh of the poor souls who died in Flanders Fields and elsewhere. Same thing in some of the big battles of the Civil War. That might be enough to put you off pork for awhile, but here's the question. There is one thing a pig absolutely will not eat, and it is something we humans consume with regularity. What is it? If you know the answer I'll guarantee you are as country as cracklin' cornbread.
With that, I better get busy doing something more productive but which will be far less fun.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

lauxier
01-09-2010, 11:51 AM
how about those frozen fish sticks that are made from "fish products",when you cook em they smell like a japenese whaling ship in july.Jim you are,i beleive,addressing what you percieve as a primordial flaw in us humans as oppposed to good judgement by the pig,which means a pig is in its own way kind of smart----therefore a pig's attributes would be 1)pudgy but cute 2)will eat most anything except the mystery food 3)is dirty,but could care less3)and relatively intelligent in a cooking channel sort of way--makes you wonder why pigs don't run for the US senate.

Huey Long on cutting a country ham from a hog raised on his farm-"In the face that was the prettiest pig I ever saw..."

I bought a cured country ham(a real salt cured ham,not a city ham)from a guy outside newport tenn, it weighed about 30 lbs,and was "old",had hung for 2 yearrs.It was the best ham I've ever tasted..he told me his cured hams came from hogs fattened on peanuts,he raised.I told him that was a good idea,being peanuts are high in protein etc.He said it was not an original idea..he borrowed it off Thomas Jefferson,who fattened his hogs on peanuts many many years ago.

FLYFSN
01-09-2010, 01:20 PM
Jim,
One thing a pig will not eat is a cucumber. Is that what you had in mind?

old tom
01-09-2010, 03:28 PM
Somewhere around here I've got 50 year old pictures of a hog killin' - skint, hanging upside down by his hind quarters and a big black pot of boiling water over on the side - all shot with my Brownie box camera.

Short of the nearly impossible task of finding a scene like that again, does anyone know where I could buy real cracklings? I've found several recipes online and lots of paces where I could order them. But I don't necessarily want to buy a pig in a poke (pun intended).

Jim Casada
01-09-2010, 04:25 PM
FLYFSN--You win the prize (which, since I promised nothing esle, is the heartiest of congratulations on a life obviously lived, at least in part, on a farm). For whatever reason, pigs won't touch cucumbers. My 100-year-old father won't either, and always says, "I'm not about to eat something I hog won't eat." Jim Casada

Jim Casada
01-09-2010, 04:28 PM
Old Tom--Many grocery stores sell them, but of course that presents the "Pig in a poke" problem. If you are in Bryson City at the present you might want to check with the guy out Needmore way (close to Maple Springs) who does custom butchering and sells meat. I don't think it likely he renders the fat into lard but he might well know someone who does.
Jim Casada

Jim Casada
01-09-2010, 04:28 PM
Old Tom--Many grocery stores sell them, but of course that presents the "Pig in a poke" problem. If you are in Bryson City at the present you might want to check with the guy out Needmore way (close to Maple Springs) who does custom butchering and sells meat. I don't think it likely he renders the fat into lard but he might well know someone who does.
Jim Casada

gmfishe
01-09-2010, 05:40 PM
A bear is about as bad as a hog for eating anything......but when camping, we never worried about pulling our potatoes up in a tree.....a bear won't touch'em. As mentioned before, they are mighty good fried along with a mess of trout.
GM

Brook Fan
01-10-2010, 09:29 AM
As I sit here this morning and the therometer says 5 degrees this thread provided a little warmth. I started thinking about grilling a few trout stuffed with a clove of garlic and sun dried tomatoes.

But atlast I'm chicken and just can't find the intestional fotitude to wade a stream to catch the trout this morning. I'm up for starting the grill if someone else will take the plundge so to speak.

sammcdonald
01-10-2010, 07:39 PM
i remember a morning in july over 30 years ago, i caught 4 nice rainbows.....early morning....had fresh maters....fried the trout in meal and oil....best breakfast trout and maters...oh, and coffee

BlueRaiderFan
01-10-2010, 10:03 PM
Mmmmm....fried green maters?

Jack
01-11-2010, 01:52 PM
You guys make my mouth water for all that good stuff. However, I say let the trout stay in the water. I much prefer bass or bream to trout. (personal taste of course) Never have acquired a taste for trout. My wife and I have tried it many times and in different ways and still do not care for it. The rest of all your suggestions is "good to go".

BlueRaiderFan
01-11-2010, 07:59 PM
Never eaten any bass, but I LOVE panfish!:biggrin:

Hatchie Dawg
01-14-2010, 08:17 PM
As somewhat of a re-rail, I had never been fond of trout but had never had a wild trout until this past summer. My daughter and I ate two trout caught from Deep Creek cooked with no more seasoning than a little salt and pepper on a grill over an open fire. I really didn't expect much but the fish was excellent, as good as any I have ever had. It was mild and almost sweet. I was surprised and had no idea there was such a difference in stocked fish and wild ones.

I look forward to the day I can eat another. It's just hard to improve on nature.