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buzzmcmanus
03-05-2010, 02:13 PM
I skipped a half day of work and fished the Clinch yesterday. It was an outstanding day for me. I'm still figuring that place out. Caught 12-15 fish.

I fished a EHC fly with a midge dropper. All fish but 2 came on the midge. My only brown and the biggest rainbow both came on the caddis fly.

Very few people were out. Had 4 fishing above me and 3 below, but they were all at least a hundred yards away, and most of them left when the water quit dropping.

Carlito
03-05-2010, 02:18 PM
Buzz, I have what is probably a dumb question for you and everyone else one here... when you are fishing tailwater like the Clinch, do you typically cast/fish your way up stream or down stream?

silvercreek
03-05-2010, 02:30 PM
I fish mostly surface flies, and I fish downstream. Regards, Silvercreek

buzzmcmanus
03-05-2010, 02:49 PM
Buzz, I have what is probably a dumb question for you and everyone else one here... when you are fishing tailwater like the Clinch, do you typically cast/fish your way up stream or down stream?

I normally move very little. I'll pick a spot and fish it for a lengthy period of time. If I'm fishing with midges and an indicator/dry, I'll cast upstream to get a more natural drift. If I'm fishing softhackles, I'l cast down and swing them.

I'm not really the person you want to take lessons from about fishing the Clinch, though. Maybe MadisonBoats or waterwolf will chime in on this. They've both probably forgot more than I'll ever know about tailwaters.

92Esquire
03-05-2010, 09:25 PM
Had probably my best day on the Clinch. I started at the Weir dam (which was oddly uncrowded) and fished there for a couple hours. I drove down to Miller's Island and was shocked at how many folks were there. I waded down the far side, found a spot between a couple guys, and the fish gods proceeded to smile upon me for a while. All rainbows, chunky, hard fighting fish that got me to wet my net for the first time in a while.

Great day to fish. Wonder how insane it's going to be at noon tomorrow.

ChemEAngler
03-05-2010, 10:29 PM
92Esquire,
I started out today at the weir dam as well. Actually a couple hundred yards downstream, but when the wind picked up I moved up above the weir pool. I only managed two below the weir dam, both on midges. I usually kill them on midges, but the waves being blown by the wind were so large at times they were completely overtaking my little wisp of poly yarn indicator. Above the weir I was throwing streamers on a sinking tip line and managed 4. None of the fish today were very large, and I too was quite surprised at the lack of fishing pressure. Ran into a young fisherman there from UT who was new to the Clinch, wonder if he is on this message board? It was still a good day to get out and enjoy the beautiful weather.

However, I once again realized why I prefer to fish the lower portion of the Clinch. The fish tend to be a little larger and the water temps are usually a couple degrees warmer making them more active. I ran into six different guys walking out with limits on their stringers, and most were just shy of the slot limit.

Carlito,
In response to your question, on waters like the Clinch and SoHo I typically use an across and down presentation. Meaning I make a cast across (or quartering upstream) and let it drift all the way downstream feeding line to it as it drifts below me. Most of my strikes occur when the fly is downstream of my location. However, I think everybody should fish how they are most comfortable. I believe fishing success hinges so much on an individual's confidence. I personally have confidence that I will catch fish everytime I step foot on the Clinch and SoHo using midges. And I do. I haven't been skunked on the clinch or SoHo in over two and a half years now, knock on wood. The Watauga and Hiwassee are completely different stories. I focus more on my rig, technique, presentation, and my surroundings when I have confidence in where I am fishing and/or what I am using.

MadisonBoats
03-06-2010, 11:15 AM
Buzz, I have what is probably a dumb question for you and everyone else one here... when you are fishing tailwater like the Clinch, do you typically cast/fish your way up stream or down stream?

This is a very good question bud! I think a skilled fly fisherman should be able to fish in any direction he wants to fish on any stream. This helps to maximize productive casts and minimize physical movement. However; it depends on the situation if you can cast up stream or down stream or sideways... You should have attack points that you are trying to fish and focus on giving that point the correct presentation. Remember to pull in the slack when fishing up stream or you will miss your fish....

My preference is a 10 or 2 o'clock upstream cast above a pool so that I can quickly adjust my drift to get the best presentation at the pool.

waterwolf
03-07-2010, 12:11 AM
I normally move very little. I'll pick a spot and fish it for a lengthy period of time. If I'm fishing with midges and an indicator/dry, I'll cast upstream to get a more natural drift. If I'm fishing softhackles, I'l cast down and swing them.

I'm not really the person you want to take lessons from about fishing the Clinch, though. Maybe MadisonBoats or waterwolf will chime in on this. They've both probably forgot more than I'll ever know about tailwaters.
I have some serious personal issues with soft hackles, so I won't even touch that one. But enjoy them, if that is your game.

On the other, I rarely if ever fish upstream on the Clinch, I always fish across stream or fish downstream with a dead drift slack line approach. I have found over the years, that this is by far the best method for fishing the Clinch, even the riffles and faster water. One other thing that I see tons of folks doing on the Clinch. Stay off the ledges unless you have no other choice, the high profile is taboo IMO. Stay off them, and lessen the silhouette you cast over the fish.

silvercreek
03-07-2010, 11:07 AM
Waterwolf. curiosity killed the cat, but I just gotta ask. What kind of "serious personal issues" can you have with a soft hackle? Regards, Silvercreek

Rockyraccoon
03-07-2010, 08:34 PM
Waterwolf. curiosity killed the cat, but I just gotta ask. What kind of "serious personal issues" can you have with a soft hackle? Regards, Silvercreek

I wasn't going to ask, but since you brought it up.....I'd love to hear more too!

Fill us in Wolf ? ?

jrose
03-07-2010, 10:05 PM
Yeah, that caught my eye, too. Please share with the group.

Jack

waterwolf
03-08-2010, 12:04 AM
Waterwolf. curiosity killed the cat, but I just gotta ask. What kind of "serious personal issues" can you have with a soft hackle? Regards, Silvercreek

I wasn't going to ask, but since you brought it up.....I'd love to hear more too!

Fill us in Wolf ? ?
You really don't want to even crack open that can of worms. Let's just say deep seeded issues, with the whole tactic approach and effectiveness (or lack thereof). Unplugging keyboard....now.

oldschool
03-08-2010, 08:21 AM
If you took the tremendous amount of time learning how to properly dead drift a fly..... Why ever drag one on purpose

waterwolf
03-08-2010, 08:48 AM
If you took the tremendous amount of time learning how to properly dead drift a fly..... Why ever drag one on purpose

:biggrin:.............

Carlito
03-08-2010, 10:09 AM
Hey guys, thanks for the insight on strategy. I considered hitting the Clinch on Sunday, but opted for a mtb ride in the Watershed with my buddies. I'm glad I didn't fish because there were about 5,000 people on the water. Well, not literally, but you know what I mean. I prefer a little solitude sometimes. I'm looking forward to getting my tailwater technique dialed in!

Owl
03-08-2010, 11:39 AM
Well, I'd drag one on purpose if it put fish in my hand or on my line. I like nature and "just being out there" as much as anyone does, I promise you. I'm a 1000% outdoors kinda guy. But , I'm not going to spend all day making perfect drifts with a dry if the dern trout want a softhackle or streamer. Otherwise, I could just cut the hook off the fly and go "casting" instead of "fishing." But that's just me...whatever floats your boat is alright by me too. To each, his own and to me hopefully some pretty trout. ;)

waterwolf
03-08-2010, 12:55 PM
Well, I'd drag one on purpose if it put fish in my hand or on my line. I like nature and "just being out there" as much as anyone does, I promise you. I'm a 1000% outdoors kinda guy. But , I'm not going to spend all day making perfect drifts with a dry if the dern trout want a softhackle or streamer. Otherwise, I could just cut the hook off the fly and go "casting" instead of "fishing." But that's just me...whatever floats your boat is alright by me too. To each, his own and to me hopefully some pretty trout. ;)


Being out and about is what folks say who aren't catching or killing stuff :biggrin:

Don't think for a second I am not out there for one goal, to catch and catch alot. I don't even carry dry flies with me, as I am out to catch fish on the MOST effective technique and flies. Those are not (for this area) IMO soft hackles or dries.

Seriously, I cannot remember a time when I got out fished by someone with a soft hackle. If anything they are usually the folks gazing around at folks working fish over on dead drift approaches. To each their own however.

Let's look at how it works: A sulfur nymph slowly undulates its way to the surface, hangs for just a second, and hatches. How does a soft hackle screaming across stream immitate that? How does a soft hackle hung straight down stream immitate that? A nymph dead drifted will ride the current, oscillate up and down in the water column, and stay in a general depth zone where fish are actively feeding, whether it be 6" or 6'.

FIsh what you wish, and what makes you happy, but swinging flies IMO is not the best and most effective approach on the Clinch or Holston.