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fishingman62
05-09-2010, 09:19 PM
bill and i fished the clinch today first we motored the drift boat upstream from peach orchard and had very little action bill caught 1 on a green thing and i caught 2 on an olive wolly zonker all 3 fish were between 9 and 12 inches ....action halted so after talkling to couple guys who told us the water was deep and flat for a ways we decided to head back down river to the schoals.... first cast brook trout.... they must have stocked a bunch because the next 10 fish were all brooks ... i moved down river and found more eager brooks and some small rainbows .....finally i found a nice seam and started catcing 12 inch and up fish.... healthy husky rainbows ....best fish of the day a 16 inch rainbow in a nice fast run....what a treat the fight in the fast water ...he was a big male as he milked when i picked him up ..... i wasn't aware of rainbows spawning now ....all fish came for me on olive soft hackles and bill caught the majority of his on a guatumal stick bug ... caught fish both on the dead drift and stripping the soft hackle back .....we both caught over 30 fish each between stockers and nice rainbows..... i did get 1 brown about 12 inches beautiful fish nice deep yellow color ... it was a great day on the clinch... a few sulphers coming off they started around 2pm but fish were not feeding on them on top...
dan

psnapp
05-09-2010, 10:12 PM
Great report, FishingMan!

fishingman62
05-09-2010, 11:36 PM
thaxs ps... you know i try to keep them as informative as possible for other people..... after all it will be a week or better before i get over there again.....and theres plenty of fish for everyone ...so i say let someone else enjoy and if what i posted helps them have a great day on the water or helps someone new its all good
dan

MadisonBoats
05-10-2010, 12:49 PM
Great report Dan! I am glad you had a fun day bud! I agree with your post and I like to share info. with others to help guide them to a fun and safe day! I had a feeling that upstream of Peach Orchard would be sparse. The water coming out of Coal Creek has that part of the river running pretty warm. I had temps in the mid 60s last week in that area.

Wilson10
05-10-2010, 02:17 PM
Speaking of Brook trout. A week or two ago I had an interesting conversation with a couple guys in parking lot after fishing concerning the brookies and the lack of hold overs from last year. Last year many fishermen were catching them every trip. However, this year we haven't seem very many of them at all until this point(recent stock). I asked one guy his opinion and he felt like these brookies have had a tough time adapting to a heavy midge diet in the clinch. Anyone else have a take on this?

Rodonthefly
05-10-2010, 02:26 PM
I'm no expert by no means at all, but i don't know about just a midge dite? The river tends to have more for them to eat other then midges, There are quite a few sow bugs, sulpher nymphs, crawfish and snails. But i would like to hear someones opinons as well. Maybe that they are stockers and are not healthy enough from the hatchrey.

I caught a few the other night real small. Needed a brown and I would have had a clinch river slam. :biggrin:

dizzyg
05-10-2010, 02:29 PM
Perhaps all the big browns I'm seeing ate them...

Wilson10
05-10-2010, 02:47 PM
Perhaps all the big browns I'm seeing ate them...

I'm sure that's the case with some of the brook population...:biggrin:

waterwolf
05-10-2010, 02:57 PM
Speaking of Brook trout. A week or two ago I had an interesting conversation with a couple guys in parking lot after fishing concerning the brookies and the lack of hold overs from last year. Last year many fishermen were catching them every trip. However, this year we haven't seem very many of them at all until this point(recent stock). I asked one guy his opinion and he felt like these brookies have had a tough time adapting to a heavy midge diet in the clinch. Anyone else have a take on this?


They have adapted to the food base just fine, especially since there is alot more then just midges available. It isn't food which is holding them back IMO. Afterall, you can catch them all summer on midges, but something is happening to them over the winter.

Last year we caught a couple of holdovers, but very very few.

I honestly do not know what is happening to them. I think it could be the prolonged periods of high water are driving them downstream or killing them due to starvation. Although that seems unlikely. Maybe the lake turnover each fall which warms the water to the mid 60's is pushing them over the edge and killing them, but even then you would think enough would survive by default that they would be around.

Personally I could care less if they were even there in the first place, they don't do much for me. But I do like you all find it strange they seem to thrive for the first 6 months, then vanish after that.

I do not think it is the availability of food which is the issue, maybe the ability for them to feed at higher flows, but certainly not the forage base in the Clinch.

ChemEAngler
05-10-2010, 06:13 PM
Speaking of Brook trout. A week or two ago I had an interesting conversation with a couple guys in parking lot after fishing concerning the brookies and the lack of hold overs from last year. Last year many fishermen were catching them every trip. However, this year we haven't seem very many of them at all until this point(recent stock). I asked one guy his opinion and he felt like these brookies have had a tough time adapting to a heavy midge diet in the clinch. Anyone else have a take on this?

I haven't caught one all year, and last year didn't catch many. Now two years ago they were everywhere, and at times it was hard to keep them off the hook. Most of the locations I found them stacked up in a couple years ago, they have been replaced by browns. Doesn't really bother me much either though, as I think they were primarily fish food for the larger browns. For some reason they were not developing any color to them at all. Everyone I caught was a pale gray with very faint spotting, nothing like some of the brookies I saw come out of the Caney. Don't know if I buy the midge argument or not. Best I recall there is a healthy population in the Norfolk and Little Red and they are midge and scud heavy tailwaters.

Grannyknot
05-11-2010, 08:09 AM
For some reason they were not developing any color to them at all. Everyone I caught was a pale gray with very faint spotting, nothing like some of the brookies I saw come out of the Caney.

I caught a few in January that had colored up very nicely. Much like a mountain brook trout with the black mouth and bright red fins with white tips. I caught them in the weir pool during one of the 2 or 3 days in January where they turned the generators off. I'll try to find a picture when I get a chance.

waterwolf
05-11-2010, 08:26 AM
I haven't caught one all year, and last year didn't catch many. Now two years ago they were everywhere, and at times it was hard to keep them off the hook. Most of the locations I found them stacked up in a couple years ago, they have been replaced by browns. Doesn't really bother me much either though, as I think they were primarily fish food for the larger browns. For some reason they were not developing any color to them at all. Everyone I caught was a pale gray with very faint spotting, nothing like some of the brookies I saw come out of the Caney. Don't know if I buy the midge argument or not. Best I recall there is a healthy population in the Norfolk and Little Red and they are midge and scud heavy tailwaters.
We caught 2 holdovers last year, and both of them were gorgeous. Other then that they are pretty pitiful looking. Usually cigar shaped with very washed out colors.

I think the browns have a field day with them, they seem to be about the dumbest of the three species in the river. I have seen them cruising aimlessly lost around deeper holes just asking to get nailed.

I certainly hope this little experiement is not costing us anything at the state level. I thought I had heard they were free, but find that hard to believe.

IMO, money would be better spent working on other projects then throwing another species into the mix. I am glad some folks enjoy them, but for now they for some reason seem to be a seasonal thing.

Wilson10
05-11-2010, 10:19 AM
I think the browns have a field day with them, they seem to be about the dumbest of the three species in the river. I have seen them cruising aimlessly lost around deeper holes just asking to get nailed.

I certainly hope this little experiement is not costing us anything at the state level. I thought I had heard they were free, but find that hard to believe.

IMO, money would be better spent working on other projects then throwing another species into the mix. I am glad some folks enjoy them, but for now they for some reason seem to be a seasonal thing.

I agree with WW on both of these statements. Yeah I feel the browns are tearing up the brookies and they are by far the DUMBEST of the three species. Sometimes last year I wondered if they would hit a bare hook presented with a nice drift;)

I also find it hard to believe these trout are free... somewhere down the line somewhere we are paying for these suckers.

waterwolf
05-11-2010, 10:57 AM
I agree with WW on both of these statements. Yeah I feel the browns are tearing up the brookies and they are by far the DUMBEST of the three species. Sometimes last year I wondered if they would hit a bare hook presented with a nice drift;)

I also find it hard to believe these trout are free... somewhere down the line somewhere we are paying for these suckers.
I bet they would eat a bare hook. I will say the handful of guide trips I have been pulled out of retirement to do, they made life easy for the new fly fishers in the boat. They eat everything, which in some ways is not a bad thing from a fishing point of view.

I would rather see money spent on habitat improvements or research then wasted on brook trout. Sure it was kind of cool, I guess, the first few landed, but now they provide little if anything of value except maybe a food source for other larger trout.

I love the park brookies, they are gorgeous and usually live in places which are out of the way and special. Those are fine, but in our tailwaters, rainbows and browns are enough to keep me satisfied.