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DBKSTONE2
06-17-2010, 08:43 PM
I have been doing some wishful thinking about a drift boat or similar craft. I have never owned a drift boat but when I started fly fishing I have been "exposed" to them and I am very jealous when one floats by. I guess I have the fever. I have been researching online and 2 very different crafts have caught my eye. I like the look of the North Fork Outdoor's Outlaw avenger XX (Dave Scadden design). It appears to be a pontoon on steroids! I know it not technically a drift boat but it could get the job done. Not to mention it is $2,500 (trailer not included). The other choice is a Pavati Warrior. Have you seen this thing? My Lord is it nice and very pricey! I think it would be 14.5-17K not counting freight from Oregon.

I could use some advice or insight about the boats above and anything in between. I plan on doing a lot more research but your feedback is much appreciated.

Thanks,

DBK

Rodonthefly
06-18-2010, 08:48 AM
you could always buy my hyde!!!!!! I'm wantting a raft:rolleyes:

MadisonBoats
06-18-2010, 10:58 AM
Drift boats are wonderful fishing craft. I do hope to have my own brand on the market for the Eastern Folks one day:)

Have you looked in to buying an aluminum boat + trolling motor? You can get a great set up for under $500 with a trailer. Look at a semi-v to flat hull.

Craigslist is loaded with them; just check late at night or early in the AM if you want first shot on one. Forget the need for a motor if you just plan on drifting. I always hate having a gas tank in the boat and the noise is not good for the trout:eek:. Mount a good deep cycle up in the front or under the front seat and run some jumper cable (cut off the clamps) wires to the trolling motor. Throw a 60amp fuse in line for protection.

Another good idea is to flip the boat upside down on some saw horses and spray in some flotation foam under the seats.

That should get you by until I can start making my drift boats.:smile:

DBKSTONE2
06-18-2010, 07:37 PM
you guys might find this interesting. You need to get on some of the message boards from Oregon and Alaska. They make us look like rank amateurs when it comes to bickering. All you have to do is claim your drift boat brand is the best and then watch out. I think the Willie Boat Gang will send a hitman after you!! Be prepared to have your parentage questioned. I never posted anything (just lurked). I am not qualified to combat post.:p

DBKSTONE2
06-18-2010, 07:43 PM
you could always buy my hyde!!!!!! I'm wantting a raft:rolleyes:

Thanks Rod but I have seen a few of your posts and you use yours for a living. I think yours has seen a lot of "LOVIN" on the Clinch. If its still in very good shape then I do have interest. Set me straight if I am wrong.

Thanks,

DBK

waterwolf
06-18-2010, 10:46 PM
Brand choice is up to the individual IMO. I row a hyde, and have always rowed Hydes. I like the way they are laid out inside and I like the way they row better then the others out there. Mike Bone who is a member here has had more experience then anyone else in this region with different styles of boats, from rafts to drift boats of all mfg's. He now rows a Clacka and seems to think it is the toughest of the group.

On inflatables, they are great for very shallow and nasty rivers with lots of rocks which would chew drift boats to pieces. For our 2 local tailwaters they work fine, but become a nightmare in the wind. One other thing is they stick to every rock they touch, where as a drift boat will slide over most if not all rocks.

I fish out of 2 different cats (pontoons) one is 12' and the other 16', both are great boats, but are sluggish to row in slow water and are seriously influenced by the wind. However, for the smaller rivers I do, they work perfectly and are invaluable.

I am heading to bed, but will take the time in the next couple of days to a much better breakdown of pros/cons of the floating crafts which I have spent considerable time in over the years. Which is a lot, and a bunch of different mfg's. Hopefully Mike will chime in and provide his opinions as well.

MadisonBoats
06-19-2010, 10:07 AM
I fish out of 2 different cats (pontoons) one is 12' and the other 16', both are great boats, but are sluggish to row in slow water and are seriously influenced by the wind. However, for the smaller rivers I do, they work perfectly and are invaluable. .

I think these are probably my favorites for tail-waters. I like the layout and they float very shallow. Have you ever had any issues with tears or punctures?

Something neat I found on the 'Net:
I wish I had one of these so I would not have to go upstream from the church. Looks like a cool idea. You could fly upstream and just drift back down with out having to worry about another vehicle. Only drawback is limited cargo and passenger weight. Anyone ever seen one of these on a lake or river? Not bad to have a boat and a plane for $15-25k and trailer.:cool:
http://www.altitude.ca/img/flying_boat/72.753x600.jpg

Stonefly
06-19-2010, 01:14 PM
Hey Shawn -

One other drawback - how you gonna cast out of that thing??

sb

David Knapp
06-19-2010, 02:22 PM
Hey Shawn -

One other drawback - how you gonna cast out of that thing??

sb

If you all want to put together some $$$ and buy one, I'll be glad to do the experiment for the next year. At the end of the year I'll provide a detailed explanation on the best way to fish out of it including casting techniques. Think of the great opportunities this thing would open up...you just need someone to try it out first...:biggrin:

Knothead
06-19-2010, 03:47 PM
Don't know where you live. If you put any kind of motor on a boat in Tennessee, you will have to register it with the state. Just thought I would mention it.
FWIW, I know of some who like Clackacraft boats. Boulder Boats has molded hull.

DBKSTONE2
06-19-2010, 09:01 PM
Hey Madison,

You need to get off your rump and get to building a drift boat!!! You have been talking about it since last year!!! GET TO IT!!:biggrin: You know Madison Boats would be a great place to start a boat manufacturing business.:rolleyes: Some of us around here have hard dollars to spend and want to spend them LOCAL. Don't make me get the work whip out!!!:mad:

billyspey
06-19-2010, 09:57 PM
a new drift boat maker in east tennessee, mike watson in blountville tn. with help from richard childress racing team engneer. went on one of the maiden trips on the s.holston floated rock hole to bluff city on low water ,rows as good if not better than a new hyde, drafts about 4 in, water, loaded . check it out mikes ph #423-292-8102 be one of the first to own a great boat

MadisonBoats
06-19-2010, 10:03 PM
Hey Madison,

You need to get off your rump and get to building a drift boat!!! You have been talking about it since last year!!! GET TO IT!!:biggrin: You know Madison Boats would be a great place to start a boat manufacturing business.:rolleyes: Some of us around here have hard dollars to spend and want to spend them LOCAL. Don't make me get the work whip out!!!:mad:

I know bud! Unfortunately; I have been dealing with some other financial situations right now that are taking up most of boat capital money.... I will get it going! I have a killer design that would work great in the Eastern U.S. and I believe the innovations I have added will suit most fly fisherman. I have it and several other designs modeled out in CAD and I am ran them through many analysis programs for stressing, float profile, handling, etc.

I have the charter written for the model and I have a good friend that has volunteered to audit it for me. Also, I want the costs to be affordable to the average-everyday fly fisherman. Coming up with the ideas and designs are easy; but, paying for the patents gets expensive.

*One of the ideas I have been playing with is the use of 'chameleon gel-coat'; one that would change and adjust to the light and surroundings of each river, season, and thwart refraction. I believe it would be a warranty nightmare; but, something very interesting.....:biggrin:

**Forgot to mention that the complete boat will be an RTM Boat and insanely strong - Fiberglass; but, no worries about hitting shoals and rocks.

waterwolf
06-19-2010, 11:01 PM
Allright here is my part one of two on my personal boat experiences and opinions. All of the below I have used enough times to feel comfortable voicing an opinion on.

Drift Boats:

Hyde High Side Combo: Just bought my second, first one lasted 10 years of 60+ trips a year, and was used when I bought it.
Pros-- Rows great (probably the best of the bunch), tracks well, holds well in heavy current, moves with ease in slower water, tough enough (could be a little tougher), front casting deck makes a great place to sit on and recline when things are slow.
Cons---Inside layout is fair, raised decks cause cooler issues with coolers being offset unless you search for the proper size to fit in the trenches, boat sits towards the front of the trailer so moving it around is a burden (heavy).

Hyde Low side Combo:

Pros: None IMO which make it the better choice over a High side
Cons- same as the high side with the added loss of the front deck recliner, and stupidly low sides which the most seaworthy person could pitch over.

Hyde Aluminum High Side:

Pros: Tough as nails, and solidly built.
Cons: Rows like crap, unresponsive and tracks like a wet mop.

Clacka High Side:

Pros: Tougher then Hydes, open level floor design, holds extremely well in fast current.
Cons: Flexi Floor, sluggish to row in flat water, silly leg brace in the back which is like a prison cell. Little if any storage that is dry.

Clacka Low Side:

Pros: Same as above
Cons: Same as above with the addition of being too low and easy to pitch out of.

Yellowstone Drifter 15':
Pros: Great small design which makes it very maneuverable in tight places, nice layout in the inside with open floors, light as a feather and draws little if any water.
Cons: Has a tendency to squat when 3 people are in it, not tough at all, weakest fiberglass boat out there.

Yellowstone 17'
Pros: Big arse boat with lots of room, rows great with 2 or 3 people, and the rest is the same as above.
Cons: Same as above.

Koffler Aluminum:

Pros: Tough as diamonds
Cons: Too many to list, in other words don't waste the coin on this one.



I will do rafts tomorrow, but my personal drift boat preference is Hyde, I like the way they row and now that I have the cooler thing worked out, the issues I had have passed. I could not live without the recliner front deck as well. :biggrin:

MadisonBoats
06-19-2010, 11:36 PM
Allright here is my part one of two on my personal boat experiences and opinions. All of the below I have used enough times to feel comfortable voicing an opinion on.


Excellent descriptive Jim and one that I took note of... I am sure this will help many other fellow fly fishermen in choosing a boat.

*One thing about my boats; they are not meant to be rowed! Sorry fellas! I design boats that are meant for one-man operation; not one-man capacity and for maximum fly fishing with less headache. I have several different electric motors to offer and the option of trolling motors. An 80# thrust with remote steering is my kind of boat. I would rather spend the time focusing on the fish than trying to work a boat and I think most fly fishermen would agree...

waterwolf
06-20-2010, 10:49 PM
Part Two: Soft Boats (Rafts/Catarafts)

Maravia 17' with NRS fishing frame:

Pros: Big, indestructible, and fairly versatile.
Cons: Draws tons of water, pain in the butt to fish out of (constantly hung on something, typical of rafts), sticks to every rock it touches.

Avon 15' NRS fishing frame:

Pros: More maneuverable in low water, tough, and best size for 3 people
Cons: Same as above

Outcast PAC1200:
Pros: Most versatile boat on the market, draws the least of any boat I have seen (3"-4"), fits in a truck bed, can be carried easily by 2 people, ATV of the watercraft world.
Cons: Not the most comfortable boat to fish out of, rower sits low, not designed to cover distances rowing, only handles 2 people

Outcast PAC1600:
Pros: Big/Roomy, handles big mean whitewater with ease, tough, extremely stable
Cons: Sticks to every rock it touches, draws 6"-8" of water, must be trailered, lots to hang line on inside.

Star Bug (Hybrid Raft/Cat):
Pros: All the advantages of both in one
Cons: All the negatives of both in one

Bottom line on soft boats, they are not as easy to fish out of as hard boats, but are perfect for the nastier rivers around. They can take hit after hit with no damage. The cats are nice because they allow for splitting of rocks which would otherwise hang up a raft. They also let water across the decks which is nice to keep you cool during the summer. All rafts draw more water, and are harder to row then a drift boat. The frames on the market all leave a little to be desired, and most for the rafts are floorless, so floors have to be purchased separately.

If I was buying a soft boat tomorrow, it would be one or both of the Outcasts, they are by far more versatile then a full on raft IMO.

Wilson10
06-21-2010, 06:23 PM
Great info there Wolf. Thanks a lot!

Rodonthefly
06-22-2010, 12:45 PM
Ok I have a question, not about types of boats but about drift boats. I row and don't use a motor.

As far as safty stuff what is required in a drift boat? i carry life jackets and have some small first aid stuff. But am I required to carry throw coshins, horns whistles and so on?

Wilson10
06-22-2010, 01:57 PM
Rod - You know how I like to take a swim...would you mind gettin a throw cushin? haha

Rodonthefly
06-22-2010, 02:48 PM
Rod - You know how I like to take a swim...would you mind gettin a throw cushin? haha


Yeah I was thinking about hitting a big lay down in the water fliping the boat and us both ending up a 61, not to mention I'm going to get one for each of my fly rods. lol

Mike boone said he rode a blow up matress down the river wonder if anyone has rode a throw cushin down?

MadisonBoats
06-22-2010, 10:12 PM
OK, my dad would kill me for posting this... Anyone remember the great Budweiser Inner Tube Race on the Clinch River? I was amazed from the stories that no one drowned. However, it sure sounded like one heck of a good time!

This is my dad preparing his raft in the fields right below the dam. He told me that he gave a guy a ride back to the dam and when they pasted the guy's car; he just jumped out of the truck while it was still in motion and tumbled down in to the field. He got up and walked on down like nothing happened...

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=3&pictureid=482

waterwolf
06-22-2010, 10:44 PM
Ok I have a question, not about types of boats but about drift boats. I row and don't use a motor.

As far as safty stuff what is required in a drift boat? i carry life jackets and have some small first aid stuff. But am I required to carry throw coshins, horns whistles and so on?
I have no idea, I have never been checked, but think it is just lifejackets. I carry nothing, and will deal with the citation when it happens. Call me a law breaker, but that is the truth. If you pitch in the Clinch with the water running with or without lifejacket, your life is in peril. Of course a lifejacket would help, but I don't plan on ending up in it, and rarely if ever am on it during high water periods.

Wilson10
07-04-2010, 04:38 PM
Anyone have experience on a Hog Island Drifter?

Troutman
07-04-2010, 11:38 PM
Anyone have experience on a Hog Island Drifter?

Have a friend that used to own one. They are very comfortable, quiet, incredibly tough drift boats. I liked all the room it had also. floated some trout and smallie rivers in it. Nice boats.
Wish HI would build a flat bottom wide jon boat style boat with the same materials as the drifters.

waterwolf
07-05-2010, 06:15 AM
Anyone have experience on a Hog Island Drifter?
I have never rowed one, but do not like their design. The chessy and cheap front leg brace is horrible in comparison to the Clacka and Hyde design, and I had heard there was some issues with the boat warping when left in the sun. The latter could be false.

Overall the interior layout is just not to my liking.

Rodonthefly
07-05-2010, 06:46 PM
Ok I have a question about drift boats......


WHO IS GOOD AT GLASS WORK :confused: :mad:

Troutman
07-05-2010, 11:11 PM
Ok I have a question about drift boats......


WHO IS GOOD AT GLASS WORK :confused: :mad:

There is a shop just down the road from me on Boyds Creek Hwy in Seymour/Sevierville called Norwoods Fiberglass repair 865- 429-9664
I've never personally had to use him but he works on a lot of bass and ski boats and must do good work because he stays pretty busy.

DarrinG
07-06-2010, 07:16 AM
As far as safty stuff what is required in a drift boat? i carry life jackets and have some small first aid stuff. But am I required to carry throw coshins, horns whistles and so on?

Not sure in TN, but NC requires us to have a PFD for every person on board. Under 13 years of age must have the PFD ON! We are also required to have a noise-making device, (ei: horn, etc). I spoke with a local Wildlife Officer here and he stated to me that a referee whistle would indeed qualify for me in my 13ft Outcast cataraft. So that's what I carry in a boat bag, a small sports whistle! I believe TN requires the same if I'm not mistaken.

Wilson10
07-06-2010, 08:27 AM
The chessy and cheap front leg brace is horrible in comparison to the Clacka and Hyde design


Yeah, I thought that leg brace was sub-par to say the least. Pretty stupid looking


Wolf - are you going to Alaska with J.Curtis and that group?

waterwolf
07-06-2010, 02:35 PM
Not sure in TN, but NC requires us to have a PFD for every person on board. Under 13 years of age must have the PFD ON! We are also required to have a noise-making device, (ei: horn, etc). I spoke with a local Wildlife Officer here and he stated to me that a referee whistle would indeed qualify for me in my 13ft Outcast cataraft. So that's what I carry in a boat bag, a small sports whistle! I believe TN requires the same if I'm not mistaken.
TN does require the same except the noise maker.
Yeah, I thought that leg brace was sub-par to say the least. Pretty stupid looking


Wolf - are you going to Alaska with J.Curtis and that group?
No, I am grounded here, I travel so much during hunting seasons that my out of town fishing trips are very limited anymore.

Troutman
07-08-2010, 11:30 AM
I fished out of one of these RO skiffs http://www.rodriftboats.com/Ro-Skiff.html on the madison river years ago. Was wondering why you don't see more people using them around here. seems like it would be perfect for the rivers around here. It was easy to enter and exit from when you wanted to anchor and jump out to wade fish as opposed to a couple of high side drifters I've been in.
What do you guys think? Do you think skiffs would be as good as a standard drifter on the area rivers? Hyde makes a nice one also. http://hydeoutdoors.com/boats/new/skiff

Wilson10
07-08-2010, 01:36 PM
I fished out of one of these RO skiffs http://www.rodriftboats.com/Ro-Skiff.html on the madison river years ago. Was wondering why you don't see more people using them around here. seems like it would be perfect for the rivers around here. It was easy to enter and exit from when you wanted to anchor and jump out to wade fish as opposed to a couple of high side drifters I've been in.
What do you guys think? Do you think skiffs would be as good as a standard drifter on the area rivers? Hyde makes a nice one also. http://hydeoutdoors.com/boats/new/skiff


I've never fished out of a skiff, but would agree that they would seem to be easy to enter and exit from. They seem like good boats and would probably fit well with the tailwaters of our area.

waterwolf
07-08-2010, 02:40 PM
The problem is the exiting, and by exiting I mean being tossed out or falling out. None of the low side boats I have seen or fished out are worth owning. Around here, there is no reason to float and wade, thus worrying about exiting the boat is only of concern a couple of times during the day.

High sided boats are easy to get out of, and also provide some level of security.

I looked at the RO boats and was not impressed with their quality, layout and durability.

Knothead
07-08-2010, 03:35 PM
I think a PFD is required in Tennessee. Check with the TWRA Boating Division, 615-781-6682. I have floated a couple of times and I was furnished an inflatable PFD that looks like a fanny pack.

Troutman
07-08-2010, 04:32 PM
The problem is the exiting, and by exiting I mean being tossed out or falling out. None of the low side boats I have seen or fished out are worth owning. Around here, there is no reason to float and wade, thus worrying about exiting the boat is only of concern a couple of times during the day.

High sided boats are easy to get out of, and also provide some level of security.

I looked at the RO boats and was not impressed with their quality, layout and durability.

I'm surprised that you don't stop and wade on the shoals and the channels around islands, especially on the smallie rivers. You know that some of those channels hold fish that never see an angler fishing from boats. :biggrin: I guess I'm just used to doing that from the canoe since I can't really anchor down in current like a drifter can.
One thing that I remember from the guide telling me when I was floating with him in the RO skiff, was that I had to stay centered in the boat as we were drifting. I would turn sideways at times and he would fuss. said it was hard to keep the boat tracking correctly or something. Maybe he just didn't want me to fall out!
Anyways , good info.

MadisonBoats
07-08-2010, 05:36 PM
I think it is good to be able to float and wade from a boat. I feel it is a completely different experience on the water. Also, it is nice when two or more fly fisherman want to free up their casting restrictions. Sometimes it is good to get out and help the boat through some shoals.

MB Boats coming soon...:rolleyes:

waterwolf
07-08-2010, 10:45 PM
I'm surprised that you don't stop and wade on the shoals and the channels around islands, especially on the smallie rivers. You know that some of those channels hold fish that never see an angler fishing from boats. :biggrin: I guess I'm just used to doing that from the canoe since I can't really anchor down in current like a drifter can.
One thing that I remember from the guide telling me when I was floating with him in the RO skiff, was that I had to stay centered in the boat as we were drifting. I would turn sideways at times and he would fuss. said it was hard to keep the boat tracking correctly or something. Maybe he just didn't want me to fall out!
Anyways , good info.
I yell at folks in my boat as well to stay centered, the slightest lean and the boat leans to that side digging that oar deeper and making it hard to row. In shallow water it causes the chine to dive and seek out rocks to smash into.

We float pretty long distances and spending time wading is time we don't have. Plus in my own experiences wading for smallmouth is not nearly as productive as drifting through. My goal is to cover lots of water, high grading the best lies along the way.

I pretty much refuse to get out to walk the boat through shoals, unless there is no choice and dragging is the only option. I will ram anything if I think there is a chance of success and not having to get out and fight the boat and river.

waterwolf
07-09-2010, 07:58 AM
Editing for duplication........

Rick_in_AL
09-08-2010, 11:27 PM
I think these are probably my favorites for tail-waters. I like the layout and they float very shallow. Have you ever had any issues with tears or punctures?

Something neat I found on the 'Net:
I wish I had one of these so I would not have to go upstream from the church. Looks like a cool idea. You could fly upstream and just drift back down with out having to worry about another vehicle. Only drawback is limited cargo and passenger weight. Anyone ever seen one of these on a lake or river? Not bad to have a boat and a plane for $15-25k and trailer.:cool:
http://www.altitude.ca/img/flying_boat/72.753x600.jpg
I saw one of these last spring, flying down the beach in Destin Florida. I had never heard of one before...Really amasing to see when you're not expecting it. I had just driven over an hour one way to our fishing spot close to Panama City...Kinda makes you want one until you see the price.

Petey
01-14-2011, 05:53 PM
Not sure if this subject is dead or not. But thought I would offer a little different point of view from somebody that rows a little different boat.

I have rowed Hydes and Clacka's low and high sides in the past. So I am not going to go into that as Waterwolf gave a really good description of both.

What I do row and have rowed for the past 5 years is a Boulder Boat Works drift boat. The boat is made primarily of HDPE, and is welded using the plastic weld technology. It is not a rotomold like the Hog, therefore not nearly as bulky or cumbersome. The gunnels are oak, the casting decks and ribbing is mahogony. She is a high side boat 17 feet in length. I have rowed the Hiwassee, part of the Colorado, the Clinch, Holston, South Holston and Watauga in it. High water on some low water on others. I have taken some nasty hits and put her in places that made me pucker.

The Pro's, the boat is about bomb proof. The plastic make up of the boat is extremely strong. It is giving but not soft by any means. The slick bottom allows me to belly up to and slide over rocks that I see many aluminum and fiberglass boats get stuck on. My version also has full bench storage under the front seat and rowers position. So there is plenty of dry storage. She is a little bigger boat than most on the water which allows more room to move and gear to store. Also the seats that came it are some the most comfortable that I have ever set on. It is easy to clean and doesn't hold water stain. It has classic lines and is very easy on the eyes. Not sure about the Hog Islands, but my boat has never warped.

The Cons, she is heavy. Not tremendously so, but her size and weight make her float a tad deeper. Which makes her not as nimble. Once you get her on top of the water she will hold, but it takes a good pull to do so. I have 8.5 foot oars, I could see myself easily switching over to 9 or 9.5. While she isn't easly pushed by the wind, you have to be true on your line when dealing with fast water. Because once you are in it you are committed. Also the wood work requires more time and maintance seasonly. The varnish will wear off and you find yourself sanding and reapplying every so often. One day (luckily not anytime soon) the chine will need to be worked on, so finding a person that works with HDPE is not quite as easy as finding someone that works with Fiberglass.

All in all I have enjoyed her.

Boulder Boat Works offers varying packages and customizing what you want is not hard.

http://www.boulderboatworks.com/bbw_driftboats.html

I don't sell them, I make nothing off of them. Just thought I would provide a link so you could check them out.

Petey :)

Bfish
01-17-2011, 04:52 PM
Just an FYI, but I need to sell one of my three river boats:

1) 14' Cataraft, set-up for 2 people, but you could easily go with three. Frame and tubes have not even been in the water.

2) Outcast Pac 1400 -- well used but still has a couple years left on Aire's 10 year no fault warranty.

3) 13' Gheenoe

Feel free to send a message if you need more details.

MadisonBoats
01-18-2011, 06:30 PM
Not sure if this subject is dead or not. But thought I would offer a little different point of view from somebody that rows a little different boat.

I have rowed Hydes and Clacka's low and high sides in the past. So I am not going to go into that as Waterwolf gave a really good description of both.

What I do row and have rowed for the past 5 years is a Boulder Boat Works drift boat. The boat is made primarily of HDPE, and is welded using the plastic weld technology. It is not a rotomold like the Hog, therefore not nearly as bulky or cumbersome. The gunnels are oak, the casting decks and ribbing is mahogony. She is a high side boat 17 feet in length. I have rowed the Hiwassee, part of the Colorado, the Clinch, Holston, South Holston and Watauga in it. High water on some low water on others. I have taken some nasty hits and put her in places that made me pucker.

The Pro's, the boat is about bomb proof. The plastic make up of the boat is extremely strong. It is giving but not soft by any means. The slick bottom allows me to belly up to and slide over rocks that I see many aluminum and fiberglass boats get stuck on. My version also has full bench storage under the front seat and rowers position. So there is plenty of dry storage. She is a little bigger boat than most on the water which allows more room to move and gear to store. Also the seats that came it are some the most comfortable that I have ever set on. It is easy to clean and doesn't hold water stain. It has classic lines and is very easy on the eyes. Not sure about the Hog Islands, but my boat has never warped.

The Cons, she is heavy. Not tremendously so, but her size and weight make her float a tad deeper. Which makes her not as nimble. Once you get her on top of the water she will hold, but it takes a good pull to do so. I have 8.5 foot oars, I could see myself easily switching over to 9 or 9.5. While she isn't easly pushed by the wind, you have to be true on your line when dealing with fast water. Because once you are in it you are committed. Also the wood work requires more time and maintance seasonly. The varnish will wear off and you find yourself sanding and reapplying every so often. One day (luckily not anytime soon) the chine will need to be worked on, so finding a person that works with HDPE is not quite as easy as finding someone that works with Fiberglass.

All in all I have enjoyed her.

Boulder Boat Works offers varying packages and customizing what you want is not hard.

http://www.boulderboatworks.com/bbw_driftboats.html

I don't sell them, I make nothing off of them. Just thought I would provide a link so you could check them out.

Petey :)

Is this LDPE used in this boat? I have used HDPE for many years and it is super heavy and strong. Very nice looking boat. I am curious if they utilized any resins in the process. I know HDPE and LDPE are horrible for vertical encapsulation in resin. Thanks for sharing the information. I like the styling and lines on this boat.

Rodonthefly
01-18-2011, 11:36 PM
Bfish I might be interested in that oucast. Care to send me some pictures and info to clinchriverflyfishing@gmail.com

Petey
01-21-2011, 12:08 PM
Madison, from my understanding the hull and chine are constructed using HDPE. When you ask about the use of Resins, I am not exactly sure what the process is. The hull appears to be made of three pieces. From front to back is a solid sheet of plastic. The bow is then reinforced and welded, instead of being tacked or fastened. The stern is another sheet that is cut and welded. The chine appears to be one solid piece and nearly an inch thick, which is then welded outside and in to the hull of the boat. The benches and rear seat support, along with the raised floors are all made of the same plastic. It just appears the use different thickness's of the plastic. Most everything in the boat appears to be screwed or weld in place.

On their website they offer a do it yourself building kit which might answer some of your questions.

Petey

Bfish
01-24-2011, 09:54 AM
Bfish I might be interested in that oucast. Care to send me some pictures and info to clinchriverflyfishing@gmail.com

Email sent.