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Mundele
07-07-2010, 11:27 PM
I like to backpack and fish small streams in the backcountry in GSMNP. I don't usually carry a net, but lately I'm thinking I should start. I bet its easier on the fish.

My only net is way too big/heavy/awkward for using in the backcountry, climbing through rhodo. Does anyone know of a small folding or collapsible net that is lightweight and would travel well in a belt pouch?

--Matt

Owl
07-08-2010, 12:42 AM
Or just carry a pair of forceps and never touch the fish or take them out of the water. IMHO, for small trout fishing nets are for flyfishing gear sales magazines and Hollywood movies.

waterwolf
07-08-2010, 06:45 AM
Or just carry a pair of forceps and never touch the fish or take them out of the water. IMHO, for small trout fishing nets are for flyfishing gear sales magazines and Hollywood movies.
Agreed, most nets are much harder on the fish then either a wet hand or the forcep method.

Mundele
07-08-2010, 08:26 AM
Where I'm fishing it'd be almost impossible to keep the fish in the water while releasing them. Also they thrash around so much that I'm afraid they'll hurt themselves. Seems like a net would allow me to get them under control and back into the water much quicker. Why would a net cause them harm?

No Hackle
07-08-2010, 10:49 AM
I agree with Wolf, just make sure your hands are good and wet. Also I've seen many people grip a fish like a baseball bat, be gentle. Turning a fish upside down will usually calm it down and make it easier to remove the hook.
Lynn

waterwolf
07-08-2010, 02:43 PM
Where I'm fishing it'd be almost impossible to keep the fish in the water while releasing them. Also they thrash around so much that I'm afraid they'll hurt themselves. Seems like a net would allow me to get them under control and back into the water much quicker. Why would a net cause them harm?
Splits their tails, removes scales and slime as they thrash back in forth, even if the net is wet.

It is easy to tell fish that have been netted, other then fish which have been netted with a rubber bagged net, those seem to be fine. However, finding one in smaller sizes if fairly difficult.

I would highly recommend a rubber net for boat fisherman, dropping large fish on the bottom of the boat is bad mojo. However, for wading a net is not needed IMO.

Knothead
07-08-2010, 03:01 PM
I agree with the others. Forceps with a no-hand release. I haven't carried a net in years. Hard to work your way through the bushes, etc. Also, I mash the barbs on my hooks before I tie the fly. Easier to remove from the fish and easier to remove from me (so far, I've been lucky).

RFork
07-08-2010, 03:55 PM
Splits their tails, removes scales and slime as they thrash back in forth, even if the net is wet.

It is easy to tell fish that have been netted, other then fish which have been netted with a rubber bagged net, those seem to be fine. However, finding one in smaller sizes if fairly difficult.

I would highly recommend a rubber net for boat fisherman, dropping large fish on the bottom of the boat is bad mojo. However, for wading a net is not needed IMO.

Frabill makes a cheap, small, rubber net.

Owl
07-08-2010, 07:46 PM
What? Are you fishing from a 30 ft. bridge or something? that's interesting...where are you fishing - as in what is the landscape or whatever , not your secret hole or whatever...

And as far as the fish " hurting themselves" if you're that worried about it, take up golf. You realize that a. you are puncturing their flesh with a sharp hook and hauling them out of their natural habitat so you can look at them, and 2. they are good to eat.


right?

flyman
07-08-2010, 09:52 PM
I never have found a collapsable net that I liked. I use a small Brodin Ghost net with a magnetic release. It doesn't get in the way, and they are very lightweight. I agree most small fish don't require a net, but I feel like I can net a larger fish quicker and with less harm than playing it to complete exhaustion. Yea I'm aware that they are just fish, but I don't see any need to kill them if I don't plan to eat them.

waterwolf
07-08-2010, 10:41 PM
We use nets in the boat to land larger fish, if they are coming over the side. Many times though they are released along side the boat never leaving the water.

I have not carried one wading in a very long time, probably 15 years. I don't have much issues bringing larger fish to hand and easily removing the fly with my fingers. They are usually fairly docile and if they get off or break me off at the end then oh well.

Mundele
07-08-2010, 11:21 PM
What? Are you fishing from a 30 ft. bridge or something? that's interesting...where are you fishing - as in what is the landscape or whatever , not your secret hole or whatever...

And as far as the fish " hurting themselves" if you're that worried about it, take up golf. You realize that a. you are puncturing their flesh with a sharp hook and hauling them out of their natural habitat so you can look at them, and 2. they are good to eat.


right?

Where I fish: I like fishing very small streams, lots of climbing on boulders, I'm often not standing in the water. When I hook a fish I usually have to lift it up out of the water to grab it.

fish "Hurting themselves": Yes I understand that there's a risk to the fish. I'm ok with that (and no, I am not going to take up golf). I feel there is no need to let a fish beat itself to death as I try and grab it if a net would be easier on the fish. Part of it is self preservation too. I'm grabbing a fish with a sharp, barbed hook in its mouth. There's a fair chance I'm gonna get hooked myself.

I asked a fair question about gear in the "tackle and gear" sub forum. If you don't use a net, fine. Thanks for the input.

waterwolf
07-09-2010, 06:47 AM
Where I fish: I like fishing very small streams, lots of climbing on boulders, I'm often not standing in the water. When I hook a fish I usually have to lift it up out of the water to grab it.

fish "Hurting themselves": Yes I understand that there's a risk to the fish. I'm ok with that (and no, I am not going to take up golf). I feel there is no need to let a fish beat itself to death as I try and grab it if a net would be easier on the fish. Part of it is self preservation too. I'm grabbing a fish with a sharp, barbed hook in its mouth. There's a fair chance I'm gonna get hooked myself.

I asked a fair question about gear in the "tackle and gear" sub forum. If you don't use a net, fine. Thanks for the input.
I would caution netting fish with a dry net bag. If I take your comments the right way you are away from the water when netting fish which would make the net bag dry, that would remove all of the protective slime and a bunch of scales from the fish leaving them vulnerable to infection and death.