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knucklehead
07-23-2010, 11:11 PM
i believe the stream i'm referring to is the road prong. crosses newfound gap road several times. anyways, at the last bridge before the road tops out i set out fishing for a little while. below the bridge fishing was good. several good risers, spooked a few. but above the bridge was another story. nothing at all. fished about 200 yds upstream, really nice water, but not one strike, not one spook, nothing. just wondering if trout live above the bridge and i just didnt find them or if that portion of stream is as barren as it seems.

Crockett
07-23-2010, 11:42 PM
Road prong never crosses NFG road I don't think. Maybe the west prong of the little pigeon? What trail were you on or were you fishing from the road? By road tops do you mean the chimney tops trail? If so then yeah it would be road prong.

duckypaddler
07-23-2010, 11:59 PM
i believe the stream i'm referring to is the road prong. crosses newfound gap road several times. anyways, at the last bridge before the road tops out i set out fishing for a little while. below the bridge fishing was good. several good risers, spooked a few. but above the bridge was another story. nothing at all. fished about 200 yds upstream, really nice water, but not one strike, not one spook, nothing. just wondering if trout live above the bridge and i just didnt find them or if that portion of stream is as barren as it seems.

The fishing is OK above the last bridge. I comepletely dies out a little bit past this pool known as Grren Light Falls to the kayakers

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/picture.php?albumid=64&pictureid=435

At that point you are at about 5000 feet, and above the confluence with Tomahawk branch. While I never got a specific answer, Steve Moore & Matt Kulp both agreed it was somewhere in that section that the fish were no more.

Good luck next time
James

2weightfavorite
07-24-2010, 12:14 AM
Its still the west prong of the little pigeon. When it goes under 441 for the last time it goes strait up the mountain to the left (asuming you are driving or walking up the river). I agree with fact that somewhere right there is where the fish stop existing... Fished up a ways, and there are some decent holes and plunges, but very few fish... Kind of disappointing really. I had to try it a couple times, you never know if you just hit it on a bad day, ya know.. but after fishing it for the llast time, i will never fish that stretch again... Its just empty water.. Is it too acidic? not enough food...? Id love to now exactly why there isnt anything up that high..?

ijsouth
07-24-2010, 12:15 AM
The stream you were fishing was Walker Camp Prong; it joins Road Prong just off the road, along the trail to the Chimneys, to form the West Prong Little Pigeon. Road Prong is named for the "old" road, the old indian trail that eventually became the overmountain road, before Newfound Gap was found to be lower than the gap the old road went over. Walker Camp is a good stream, but it might be a bit too acidic in its far upper reaches - when US441 was widened, the Anakeesta formation was cut, and acid-bearing iron pyrite leached into the stream. The upper reaches might still be a bit barren.

duckypaddler
07-24-2010, 12:22 AM
I agree it was probably West Prong if he was fishing below Chimney's trailhead parking area, or Walker Camp if above. Sorry I read above last bridge on Road Prong and assumed he was talking about last foot bridge.

Knucklehead - Good avatar name!:eek:

Jim Casada
07-24-2010, 06:56 AM
knucklehead--ijsouth provides all the requisite information in precise fashion. You probably confused Road Prong and walker Camp Prong because it seems logical that the one which 441 parallels would be called Road Prong. However, the first road through the mountains, bult by the Thomas Legion in the Civil War, followed Road Prong. You'll find considerable historical information on both in my book.

As for the fish sort of petering out, he's right again--Anakeesta rock. Part of the problem was construction, but there is very little surface dirt on the Tennessee side in this area and the terrain is very steep. That means lots of acid wash out with heavy rains, and the higher up you are the worse it is. That's also why Alum Cave Creek, lower down, has relatively few fish.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

tennswede
07-24-2010, 09:16 AM
Ian,

We have been missing you on this board.

ijsouth
07-24-2010, 11:36 AM
Ian,

We have been missing you on this board.

Hans - I've been meaning to post, but I've been incredibly busy. My oldest girl is 15 now, and is quite the soccer player; I got into coaching, and I coached her team last year, and I still coach 3v3 soccer. My trips up to the mountains have been a bit curtailed; we were up there a few weeks ago, and I was going to post a report, but again - just didn't have time.

I'm headed up next weekend, for a very brief whirlwind trip - I'm bringing up a friend of mine who's never fly-fished, but is very intrigued by it and the mountains. We won't have much time, but it's now or wait until next year. I will say that last time up, I hooked the largest spec I've ever seen in the Smokies - he was easily 10 inches, and he hit the reel, taking quite a bit of line. I did everything I could, but the hook pulled out...oh well, I know where he lives now. ;)

nvr2L8
07-24-2010, 10:43 PM
Ian,

I second Hans "Welcome back". We've missed your posts. While we've never met, the folks at LRO speak highly of you (excellent endorsement in my book).

While working with the Park Service crew up on Lynn Camp Prong this past week, we shocked up the biggest brookie I have ever seen. It was (not exagerating) close to 12". It was developing a bit of a hook in the jaw and Steve Moore said he had seen brookies that size eating salamanders. While I know the pool where that one was released, chances are it will have passed into speckled heaven by the time LCP reopens. :frown:

knucklehead
07-24-2010, 11:53 PM
great responses. walker camp prong..good to know. i had always "assumed" that stretch of stream was the road prong. thanks for straightening me out. geographywas always one of my weaker subjects. too bad about that stretch of stream. i noticed small black flies, a few yellow stoneflies and other fliers of various sizes all around the stream...but not much in the stream. also, i thought the acid level might be crucial up there considering the rocks...oddly enough just downstream from the bridge..several fish were stirred up. i also noticed that just as you get below the bridge, a trickle of a stream enters. could that possibly help lower the acid level? seems like it would increase it but i'm just guessing. anyways, in the pool below that trickle were several fish. a very interesting stream physiologically and fishyologically.

Jim Casada
07-25-2010, 07:17 AM
nvr2L8--That's a monstrous speckled trout. In all my decades of dealing with and fishing for them, I've seen exactly two bigger than that. My boyhood buddy, Bill Rolen, caught one 12 1/2 inches long in Luftee at the mouth of Mingus Creek in 1958 (presumably it had come down out of Mingus Creek, which was then off limits to fishing), and about ten years back my good friend from Graham County (he's the fisherman pictured on the cover of my book) caught one of 12 3/4 inches on Big Snowbird near where Sassafras Creek enters it.
I've seen and caught a good many over 10 inches, most of them outside the Park in smaller streams in Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests. However, I personally have never landed a speck over 11 inches.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

Speckleman5
07-25-2010, 08:46 AM
I have spent the last 5 years in a relentless pursuit of the trophy spekcle and I finally landed my 12 incher earlier this year...in one of the smallest streams I have ever fished none the less. Me and a friend caught 5 fish in 100 yards over 8 inches and the last one to be seen was this guy. I wish his color had been a little better but regardless I was tickled. Here is a pic of him.http://i297.photobucket.com/albums/mm235/Speckleman5/100_0164.jpg

tennswede
07-25-2010, 10:39 AM
You got me beat with exactly half an inch. I still regret that I didn't have a camera when I got my brookie of a lifetime in the park. 11 1/2 inch on a Joe's Hopper of all things. Quarter mile above the Chimneys picnic area. It's almost a decade ago, I doubt I will ever catch a bigger one in the GSMNP.

PeteCz
07-25-2010, 10:40 AM
Ian, I second Hans "Welcome back". We've missed your posts.

Ian, I echo Hans and Charlie's sentiments, we were worried some d&%*head on the board p%$$ed you off with one of (or a series) of their posts. We've wondered where several folks have gone that used to be regulars on the board.... Glad to know you are doing well.

As for large Brookies, ones man's treasure is another man's trash...its amazing the differeing perspectives on them around the country. In many places out west they are detested. There is a stream we frequent out there that is chock full of big'ens. After about 12-13 inches the males start getting rather scary looking with Kypes and black heads...they don't look like the cute ones we have here in the park...caught him on a stream about the size of Road Prong

Here's a 12"er from Colorado he doesn't quite have the kype yet....
http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk100/PeteCz21/Brookie.jpg

ijsouth
07-25-2010, 11:01 AM
Wow, those are some big numbers. The biggest one I've taken in the park was just shy of 9 inches. I've caught bigger brookies, but they were up in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, and were (most probably) pure northern strain, which get a little bigger. I won't go into details on exactly where this fish was, but I will say that I was a bit surprised - not that there were brookies there, but that there were any of that sort of size.

Back to Road Prong...it's my daughter's favorite stream, and she usually beats me in terms of numbers of trout when we fish it. I've had mixed results - it's a little bit different from the other spec streams I like to fish. All these streams have different "personalities", and I guess some "fit the eye" better than others. As for Walker Camp, I've done pretty well there, right along the road, but I haven't tried to fish it really high, mostly because of what I've read about the acid. Lower down, it seems that the rainbows and brookies coexist quite well - it's usually a good mix of them when I fish it.

kevin.hoyt
07-27-2010, 07:29 PM
I finally made it back up to Road Prong and Walker Camp this past weekend ...mainly to beat the heat in Crossville!

Started fishing @ about 11 AM & caught 16 brookies and 3 bows on Road Prong in about 3 hours. I was surprized how low the water was and how small some of the fish were (as compared to when I fished it last summer).

Started fishing Walker Camp at about 2 PM and caught 9 bows including one 13" fish right above the first bridge adjacent to the Chimney's parking lot. The water on Walker Camp was crystal clear with tons of deep plunge pools. Never saw another fisherman all day!

A fantastic day - planning to go back this weekend.

Anybody ever fished Alum Cave Creek?

Jim Casada
07-27-2010, 08:41 PM
kevin.hoyt--I've fished Alum Cave Creek, like virtually every other stream in the Park, but save your time and fish elsewhere (unless you just want to explore). It carries a few fish, but thanks to the impact of Anakeesta rock leachate it is anything but ideal habitat for trout. If you want more details, I provide quite a bit of information as to why the situation exists in my book.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)
www.jimc (http://www.jimc)