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View Full Version : Fishing the Clinch in October and November


MBB
07-26-2010, 08:21 AM
I have fished the Clinch in April through June, but never any other months. I was thinking of fishing it in October or November. Does the river fish well in those months? Any information or advice will be much appreciated. Thanks.

waterwolf
07-26-2010, 08:30 AM
It depends on one major thing. If the lake has turned over, then fishing will be horrible as a general rule. If the lake has not turned over, it will just as good as it was during the summer.

Norris usually turns over sometime around the end of October through the first of Novemeber. When this happens the water gets off color and much warmer then usual. It usually takes several weeks to a month for it to stabilize and during that time fishing can be awful.

Water schedules can also be real iffy during those months, as TVA is trying to get the reservoirs to winter pool. If we continue with this weather pattern then they shouldn't have much issue getting the lake down, however all it takes is one tropical storm or hurricane to blow through here in September and the whole system gets inundated.

I guess the bottom line is that is the river is off, and the lake has not turned over then you can expect good fishing.

Rodonthefly
07-26-2010, 08:57 AM
Wolf, I agree with this but however I don't have a clue what the temp difference is in the water when the lake turns over. Could you answer that question. I know the water gets warmer dosn't it?

waterwolf
07-26-2010, 02:51 PM
Wolf, I agree with this but however I don't have a clue what the temp difference is in the water when the lake turns over. Could you answer that question. I know the water gets warmer dosn't it?
The water usually spikes in the mid 60's which has an imapct. That is an issue as well as the nastiness of it, and general funk which comes with lake turnover.

DannyV
07-26-2010, 03:15 PM
Waterwolf,

I am still trying to understand what this idea of lake "turnover" is. I have never fished tail waters before I moved here so there is a lot to learn. Thanks in advance.

-Dan

Stana Claus
07-26-2010, 03:45 PM
For a more in depth discussion, google "lake stratification" or "thermocline inversion". Basically, deep bodies of water form layers, or temperature gradients. There will typically be a cold, dense layer on the bottom and a warmer layer on top. The two layers will be separated by a layer called the thermocline. Inversion, or turn over, occurs when the top layer starts cooling off as winter approaches and becomes denser. Eventually, it becomes denser than the thermocline and the whole lake rolls over top to bottom. Think of it as dumping a pineapple upside down cake out of its pan. The top goes to the bottom and the bottom comes up to the top bringing all sorts of gunk up with it.

Of course, I could be totally off base here, but I think that's basically what they're talking about.

waterwolf
07-26-2010, 10:21 PM
For a more in depth discussion, google "lake stratification" or "thermocline inversion". Basically, deep bodies of water form layers, or temperature gradients. There will typically be a cold, dense layer on the bottom and a warmer layer on top. The two layers will be separated by a layer called the thermocline. Inversion, or turn over, occurs when the top layer starts cooling off as winter approaches and becomes denser. Eventually, it becomes denser than the thermocline and the whole lake rolls over top to bottom. Think of it as dumping a pineapple upside down cake out of its pan. The top goes to the bottom and the bottom comes up to the top bringing all sorts of gunk up with it.

Of course, I could be totally off base here, but I think that's basically what they're talking about.
Exactly right.

DannyV
07-26-2010, 11:44 PM
Thanks guys. Cool stuff to know. I am a total science nerd.

sam barbee
08-12-2010, 03:16 PM
go when the brown trout spawn. ---- yellow egg mcfly foam

MadisonBoats
08-12-2010, 04:48 PM
For a more in depth discussion, google "lake stratification" or "thermocline inversion". Basically, deep bodies of water form layers, or temperature gradients. There will typically be a cold, dense layer on the bottom and a warmer layer on top. The two layers will be separated by a layer called the thermocline. Inversion, or turn over, occurs when the top layer starts cooling off as winter approaches and becomes denser. Eventually, it becomes denser than the thermocline and the whole lake rolls over top to bottom. Think of it as dumping a pineapple upside down cake out of its pan. The top goes to the bottom and the bottom comes up to the top bringing all sorts of gunk up with it.

Of course, I could be totally off base here, but I think that's basically what they're talking about.

OK Stana Clause; you just told my golden secret of fly fishing - something most people rarely pay attention to when addressing fish.:biggrin: