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Mundele
08-09-2010, 04:28 PM
I was fishing in the backcountry this weekend with Crockett, my son and his son (their first backpacking trip). I was using a yellow stimulator and two separate times a dragonfly came and grabbed my fly that was dangling in midair and tried to fly off with it. It actually lifted up the fly, tippet and part of the leader and tried to fly away. I guess that Stimulator really did look buggy.

Has anyone else ever had that happen? What size hook do you use to catch those?

--Matt

Rog 1
08-09-2010, 05:21 PM
Try a #12 EHC over on Tremont....they will snatch them in mid cast

MadisonBoats
08-09-2010, 08:35 PM
Man,
I would try and set up a tripod/camera and get that on video. It would be neat to see/experience!

Jim Casada
08-09-2010, 09:07 PM
Matt--It isn't all that unusual, which is exactly why you sometimes hear old-timers (including this one, I guess) call them mosquito hawks. Whenever it happens it is a really neat experience. That leads, in turn, to a bit of a quiz to see if anyone can say what another common mountain name for dragon flies is--and it's much more commonly used than mosquito hawk. Indeed, it was the only name I knew for the insect until I was grown.
I'm guessing one or more regular visitors to this forum who grew up in the Smokies will know the answer. If not, I'll reveal it in two or three days and in truth I think I may have mentioned it in a post at some point in the past.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

nvr2L8
08-09-2010, 09:13 PM
I got a dragon fly on the end of my line once on Lynn Camp Prong (before closure). I thought I had actually hooked him in mid-air but I'm wondering after reading these accounts if he didn't just grab the fly and try to run off with it. Thought I would never get separated from that thing! I couldn't wrench control of my line for quite a bit.

Mundele
08-10-2010, 08:29 AM
Matt--It isn't all that unusual, which is exactly why you sometimes hear old-timers (including this one, I guess) call them mosquito hawks. Whenever it happens it is a really neat experience. That leads, in turn, to a bit of a quiz to see if anyone can say what another common mountain name for dragon flies is--and it's much more commonly used than mosquito hawk. Indeed, it was the only name I knew for the insect until I was grown.
I'm guessing one or more regular visitors to this forum who grew up in the Smokies will know the answer. If not, I'll reveal it in two or three days and in truth I think I may have mentioned it in a post at some point in the past.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Snake Darter?

Jim Casada
08-10-2010, 09:16 AM
Mundele--You win the prize (if I had offered one). Snake feeder, snake darter, snake fly--those are the terms I knew as a boy and continue to hear here on the N. C. side of the Smokies even today. Of course that raises the question of whether you grew up in the Smokies or were exposed to the description elsewhere. I've never heard it outside of the southern Appalachians.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

Mundele
08-10-2010, 10:03 AM
I'm from Carter County, grew up real close to the Watauga River in Stoney Creek. Not the smokies, but definitely in the southern Appalachians.

flyman
08-10-2010, 10:34 AM
They are big time predators in the insect world. The nymph has a detachable jaw that was the model for the monster in the movie Aliens, it eats other nymphs and small fishes. The adults are the fighter jets of the insect world. They can hover, cut, stop on a dime, and if I'm not mistaken they are the world's fastest flying insect.:cool:

Crockett
08-10-2010, 10:44 AM
I was behind Matt when it happened watching our boys while he was fishing a hole when it picked up his fly and started flying around with it. Funny thing is when we moved up to the next hole about 3 casts later either the same one or the previous one grabbed his fly again and was hovering with it in the air. So it happened twice in about a minutes time.

Jswitow
08-10-2010, 02:46 PM
I've had this happen several times as well. Managed to hook a Purple Martin a couple of times in my life as well. Once on the Clinch fishing a sulphur.
Really neat, the dragon flies just caught it and eventually turned loose. The little martin was hooked, and realeased!
Best,
John

jross
08-10-2010, 04:30 PM
i worked this summer and last on a NWR. last year there was an intern who did a dragon fly study on the refuge. I learned a whole lot more about 'em back home. And it was neat this past week while fishing to notice the dragonfly species in the park. I defeinately was more aware of those miniature predators this year. A lot of critters and things in the Park ( and the world for that matter) are too often overlooked...

Bran
08-11-2010, 08:03 AM
Jim, here in the Piedmont I heard them called "witch doctors" till I was on up pretty good size. They've always been a little spooky looking to me and to this day I don't like one to sit on me or hover close. I'll swat at them although I know they don't bite folks.

Jim Casada
08-11-2010, 10:41 AM
Bran--I hadn't heard that description before, but I love it. "Witch doctors" fits quite nicely with Devil's knitting needle.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

The Principal
08-11-2010, 12:03 PM
They are called Snake Doctors in Alabama.

Jim Casada
08-11-2010, 01:31 PM
Principal--That's an interesting name too--a variant on the snake feeders I have heard all my life. The long and the short of all of this is that I've got the ideal raw material, thanks to a number of you, for a little essay on these dragons of the insect world.
Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

cubefisher
08-11-2010, 03:05 PM
Will trout eat those? I've never seen any fish take one, but they look like they'd make a good meal for a decent sized fish. I don't even think I've ever seen a bass take one.

Dancing Bear
08-11-2010, 08:52 PM
That's what we call them in Georgia also.

Rog 1
08-12-2010, 08:55 AM
Catch one, hook it thru its tail and lay it on the water without any weight so it can flutter and hold on....

buster55
08-12-2010, 12:56 PM
That's real fly fishing!

Barbara
08-12-2010, 09:54 PM
Jim,

Grew up in Kentucky. My dad called them "snake doctors" and " skeeter hawks". We were not "sofistikated " enough to spell mosquito. Haha. One landed on my hand last week on Beech Flats. It was a beautiful dark blue-green that shimmered in the sunlight like a jewel.

jross
08-13-2010, 11:47 PM
Bran, they will bite a person if the person holds onto one in a wrong manner!

I have watched bass in mine and my dad's pond jump out of the water to try to catch them as they would hover. Usually about mid summer when it got real warm during the day, the little bass would try this trick.