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SuperFly
11-30-2010, 02:15 PM
Okay, so before I post my question let me give you a little background.

I grew up fishing with casting and spinning gear. Used an old bamboo fly rod with my grandfather as a kid. I have recently taken up fly fishing as a serious hobby as an adult.

I am pretty geared out for this trout season, and my casting is pretty good (for a beginner) as I took the summer to do some learning while bass fishing.


What I am posting about is this. I am interested in getting a fishing boat for the Caney Fork (closest, best water to Nashville that I know of) and I am looking for advice on the pro and cons of various boats. I currently have a sit-on-top kayak for the Harpeth and other smaller rivers like the Buffalo, but I use it in the Spring and Summer, and it isn't the style of kayak that I can stand up on (unless I want to go swimming when it flips over).

I have looked at the alumacraft style jon boats and v-hull boats, and have also looked at drift boats (used) as well. I have thought that if I go with a aluminum style boat that I would invest in an outboard jet motor since I have read on this and other forums that they can run in very shallow water with little issues.

I would primarily be fishing the Caney Fork with this boat, but wouldn't hesitate to take it to other rivers in the area as well.

Also, I am in no rush to buy a boat as I have a decent bit of money to save before I can get one so this is likely going to be a purchase for next Summer or Fall. Right now I am trying to get an idea of what to look for and how much money I would be looking at spending.

Any advice that you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

MadisonBoats
11-30-2010, 04:10 PM
Okay, so before I post my question let me give you a little background.

I grew up fishing with casting and spinning gear. Used an old bamboo fly rod with my grandfather as a kid. I have recently taken up fly fishing as a serious hobby as an adult.

I am pretty geared out for this trout season, and my casting is pretty good (for a beginner) as I took the summer to do some learning while bass fishing.


What I am posting about is this. I am interested in getting a fishing boat for the Caney Fork (closest, best water to Nashville that I know of) and I am looking for advice on the pro and cons of various boats. I currently have a sit-on-top kayak for the Harpeth and other smaller rivers like the Buffalo, but I use it in the Spring and Summer, and it isn't the style of kayak that I can stand up on (unless I want to go swimming when it flips over).

I have looked at the alumacraft style jon boats and v-hull boats, and have also looked at drift boats (used) as well. I have thought that if I go with a aluminum style boat that I would invest in an outboard jet motor since I have read on this and other forums that they can run in very shallow water with little issues.

I would primarily be fishing the Caney Fork with this boat, but wouldn't hesitate to take it to other rivers in the area as well.

Also, I am in no rush to buy a boat as I have a decent bit of money to save before I can get one so this is likely going to be a purchase for next Summer or Fall. Right now I am trying to get an idea of what to look for and how much money I would be looking at spending.

Any advice that you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

You got to check TROUTMAN's latest project! It is a beauty. I find that you appreciate things more when you put your time and effort in making them how you want.

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14472

This guy (LeeRoy) has some great articles on various boat/fishing aspects. His motor repair section is very good with plenty of pictures.

http://www.sschapterpsa.com/ramblings/Ramblings.html

SuperFly
11-30-2010, 05:59 PM
Thanks for the head's up about Leeroy's website. It looks like I will learn a lot from reading it.

As for Troutman's project, I've actually been catching up on it over the Thanksgiving holiday, and am blown away by how great it looks.

While I am actually really interested in doing something like that at some point, I have never owned a boat other than my kayak, and am not sure trying a restoration project for my first boat is a good idea (although I will take that project on in the next 5 years).

If I were to take a project like that on, what would be some good websites to help me get a plan of action together?

Thanks for your reply.

JoelO
11-30-2010, 09:08 PM
Don't own a boat but alot of guys go to this forum for restoration advice.

http://www.tinboats.net/forum/

Troutman
11-30-2010, 09:12 PM
The guys over on Mike Anderson's forum http://www.trophyfishingtn.com/smf/index.php like to use the Arkansas style fiberglass jons and Gheenoe style boats on the caney. I've never fished the caney but I'm assuming that it is a slow meandering type of river since these boats are popular. They would not be very good for rivers like the Hiwassee or Pigeon river coming out of the mtns. You would want something like a drifter or raft for those. I would think a flat bottom Jon would be good also. Make sure you get at least a 42 or 48" or wider bottom width jon, the 36" boats are tippy. You'll see a lot of 1436 jons for sale, they are too narrower to stand up and cast without feeling like your going to fall out. Keep an eye on craigslist, there a lot boats for sale right now. Many people out of work and selling or they are upgrading to something bigger or newer. I personally like the v-hulls over the low sided jons. I feel safer in them out on the lakes and rivers.
Talk with Grumpy and David Perry as they spend a lot of time on the middle tn rivers and can give you more insight to those rivers and the type of boat needed.

Joel is right, check out Tinboats for mod and restoration advice.

Bfish
12-01-2010, 12:23 AM
Gary,
Caney is deceptively swift, just not a lot of rocks to create riffle areas. You're right on the meanders though.

Superfly,
I need to downsize my boat collection. I currently have a 13' Riverhawk (like a Gheenoe), and 14' raft w/ fly frame, and 2 person inflatable pontoon. I need to sale 2 of the 3. For the Caney, the jet jon would be the fastest but too me it is the least fisherman friendly. The Arkansas style jons add lots of space, but storing them is a problem (20' long boat plus trailer tongue equals very deep garage needed). The Gheenoe is a good comprise but you suffer on the draft slightly.

My inflatable pontoon is to be set up for a motor, however it would be slow compared to the above boats, but would give you the most flexible boat, if you plan to hit other rivers.

Rafts and drift boats are pretty much downstream only boats.

Since you already have a kayak, might want to check out the Jackson Coosa, which would give you the ability to stand-up and it is made here in TN too.

No such thing as a perfect river boat, just perfect boats for certain sections of certain rivers.

MadisonBoats
12-01-2010, 11:27 AM
No such thing as a perfect river boat, just perfect boats for certain sections of certain rivers.

Well stated!:smile:

SuperFly
12-01-2010, 12:39 PM
Thanks to all for the great replies. I am starting to realize that I am going to be one of those guys that has a couple boats (if I can bribe my wife enough) for different fishing situations.

I am already doing that somewhat as I have a kayak for smaller rivers like the buffalo and Harpeth, and am looking for something with more power (preferably not man powered) for larger rivers like the Caney Fork.

I also understand that there is no best boat for every situation (or every river even). Same goes for fishing rods (that's why I have 3 fly rods).

Ideally what I am looking for, (I think) is something that I, and a friend (or two at most), can take to the Caney, drop in, float down, and then ride back up river to the trailer when done.

I am taking this season to get acquainted with the Caney and figure out what I need as far as power in a motor and such, and plan on buying a boat to restore in the coming months.

I have talked with a few guys around Nashville about what boat they use in the Caney and I hear a lot of jon boats or the Gheenoe style boats over drift boats because of the possibility that the Caney can get shallow at some spots and if you took a drift boat you would be gel coating it every trip almost.


As far as an outboard jet motor, does that make sense? A lot of what I am going off of what I have researched, and might not be accurate. That's why I have been reading this forum for the past few months, and am now starting to ask questions.

What kind of HP would a jet outboard need to power up river, and is there a website that can give me an idea of cost? I have done some research on cost, but I would love to find a used one if possible.


Thanks again for the great responses. This forum has been very educational to me, and I greatly appreciate it.

MadisonBoats
12-01-2010, 02:39 PM
Ideally what I am looking for, (I think) is something that I, and a friend (or two at most), can take to the Caney, drop in, float down, and then ride back up river to the trailer when done.

You should drive around the back roads and look for a semi-v to flat hulled john boat. The aluminum is very forgiving and extremely light. Add a short shank 9.0HP Johnson Outboard 70s-80s. It will do what you want and you could complete this set up for $600-800 price range. Also, these boats usually sell pretty well and you will break even if you put some work in to it.


I have talked with a few guys around Nashville about what boat they use in the Caney and I hear a lot of jon boats or the Gheenoe style boats over drift boats because of the possibility that the Caney can get shallow at some spots and if you took a drift boat you would be gel coating it every trip almost.

Drift boats are meant for rough water and shallow conditions. That is the idea behind their rocker footprint. Most have HDPE runners to protect them now. Plus, you are looking for significantly more money in purchasing a drift boat for a starter boat. Gheenoes are kind of gimmicky in my view point. They are really best used in narrow creeks and streams; then I would just get a canoe for $100 and save money. Strap a 2 x 4 across ways on the back and mount a small trolling motor.

As far as an outboard jet motor, does that make sense? A lot of what I am going off of what I have researched, and might not be accurate. That's why I have been reading this forum for the past few months, and am now starting to ask questions.

If you are looking for a jet lower unit/outboard; you will be spending several thousands. These are not cheap. You can buy regular outboards and the buy a retro/jet kit to build your own. However; it usually just saves a couple hundred bucks for the headache. The best motor for rivers is a 9.0hp Johnson short shank. These things can be tilted up to run in shallow water more than most trolling motors. Just be sure not to run them dry.
http://www.fast-autos.net/diecast-cars-models/diecast-car-image-large/johnson-9-5-9-1-2-hp-outboard-boat-motor_220668705382.jpg?iact=hc&vpx=218&vpy=144&dur=70&hovh=259&hovw=194&tx=109&ty=121&ei=A5b2TI6cOsX_lgewwbjABQ&oei=A5b2TI6cOsX_lgewwbjABQ&esq=1&page=1&tbnh=124&tbnw=89&start=0&ndsp=19&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0

Bfish
12-01-2010, 05:10 PM
A jet outboard looses about 30% of the hp (at the head). So a 30 hp outboard when converted to jet, will put out about 20 hp at the foot (ie where the prop used to be). Almost all jets are built on standard shaft motors (ie 20") and even then may require a jackplate or transom work to get them elevated to the right height. Heavier than a prop (for similar output hp) and higher, usually means more stress on the transom. Stronger transom is usually in a heavier thickness of aluminum boat.

A prop (especially an older 2-stroke on a 15" shaft) outboard is a good option if speed is not too critical, especially as your learning the river.

With either power choice, I suggest you motor upstream and then drift back to the ramp. Things happen, water levels could change, motors could break etc, heading back upstream is never a sure thing.

For me, the smallest aluminum jon I would go with is a 16' with 48 wide. Any more narrow or smaller is just too tippy (14' would be okay if you go with only 2 light people). The 10' and 12' jons just don't cut it for me. If you want something that size go with the gheenoe, much more floatation. Although glasswork is messy, it is much easier to repair than welding aluminum IMO. Easy to operate a gheenoe and fish while solo too.

With both boats anything over 5 hp should push you upstream at most flow levels. Larger planning area equal shallower draft and less hp needed. Increase in hp will just get you upstream faster.

I don't have enough experience with Arkansas/Supreme style jons, but understand that the long boats draft shallow and require very little hp.

Golsn.com has lots of "caney" boats. ps my riverhawk/gheenoe is listed on there too :biggrin:

Heavynets
12-01-2010, 08:58 PM
I own a Mokai. It's basically a motorized kayak. It uses an inboard 7 HP Subaru Robins 4 cycle engine to turn a turbine pump (jet). I stand up in it to fish all the time, but it is best at just getting you to a spot to wade. It will go upstream on the Cumberland at 3000 cfs with no problems. The website is Mokai.com.

Here is review I wrote about it for another site:
Now that I have about 20 hours on my Mokai I would like to give a brief review.

First the bad:

I received the boat about four weeks after my initial 4 week deliver date. Thatís a 100% error in their ability to estimate a delivery date. Unbelievable!

Iím a lightweight and can only get the boat up to 14.5 mph. I was expecting 18-19 mph. For me this is not an issue, but again they over promised and under delivered.

The noise issue is still there. I never heard the Honda, so I donít know how bad it is, but I need ear plugs if Iím going to run the Subaru over 5 mph. Why they didnít even bother to point the exhaust to the rear, I donít know. Instead the exhaust points straight up and ends flush with the engine cover.

The boat is direct drive, so it starts moving as soon as the engine starts. Mine idles at about 3-4 mph. Many times I want to go much slower. I think it needs a centrifugal clutch. This would eliminate a lot of stops and starts of the engine and give much better control of the speed.

To stop the engine you have to pull a plastic clip from under the kill switch. To restart the clip must first be manually replaced. The clip can be attached to the operator so if he fall overboard the engine stops. What is needed is the addition of a thumb actuated kill switch located at the end of the steering/accelerator bar. This would eliminate a lot of fiddling with the plastic clip.

The cockpit is a little small if you want to carry tackle box, lunch, extra clothes, etc. Not much room to move around with extra gear.

High speed maneuverability is very poor. Itís impossible to make sharp turns at full or even moderate throttle. If you are expecting jet ski performance....donít.

The boat is a little heavier than I expected. One hundred pounds is heavier than it use to be. No way I could ever put it on a car top carrier. I haul it in the back of my Ford Ranger pickup. Lifting one end at a time to only waist high is no problem.

Now the good:

That Subaru engine ALWAYS starts on the second pull when cold and on the first pull when hot. It doesnít take much pull force either. I am really impressed with that motor.

The motor and gas tank can be removed or installed in 2-3 minutes. Itís well engineered.

The engine is VERY economical on gas. I have been out for 5-6 hours and have never even use 1/2 of a tank. Iím sure this will vary with speed, but still, Iím impressed.

The boat is very stable. I frequently stand up while fly fishing with no undue concern. Trying to move around or turn around while standing is another matter.

With only a few exceptions the boat is well thought out and built with quality craftsmanship.

The boatís hull is very rugged. Iím sure it can take a beating.

To me the Mokai is the perfect river/stream boat for the guy who travels alone, getting to remote locations. It is OK to fish out of, but is best at exploring or getting you to that remote fishing or hunting location. Of course it works on lakes too, but that is a waste of the jet propulsion unless the lake has a lot of prop busting rocks.

Just my opinion.

MadisonBoats
12-01-2010, 10:54 PM
I own a Mokai.
I think I heard one of those on the Clinch once...:biggrin:

SuperFly
12-03-2010, 11:41 AM
Thanks for the great responses. I have a lot to look into before I drop some money in the new year, but at least now I know what I am looking for.

As for a outboard motor, is there a website that people post motors for sale or is it better to check craigslist?

I looked for Johnson "short shank" but came back with the first result being this forum thread. I tried short shaft and got more hits. I am assuming that the terms mean the same thing, if not let me know.

I also have a question about storage. I know that most people who have ski boats and such "winterize" their boats since they don't go in the water during fall and winter. Since we don't winterize them because we use them all year round are there any things that I need to consider from a maintenance point-of-view.

Also, I don't have a garage, but might have access to one if necessary. What is the next best way to store my boat between uses if I don't have a garage to place it in?

Thanks for the help. I truly appreciate every opinion.

MadisonBoats
12-03-2010, 05:54 PM
Thanks for the great responses. I have a lot to look into before I drop some money in the new year, but at least now I know what I am looking for.

As for a outboard motor, is there a website that people post motors for sale or is it better to check craigslist?

I looked for Johnson "short shank" but came back with the first result being this forum thread. I tried short shaft and got more hits. I am assuming that the terms mean the same thing, if not let me know.

I also have a question about storage. I know that most people who have ski boats and such "winterize" their boats since they don't go in the water during fall and winter. Since we don't winterize them because we use them all year round are there any things that I need to consider from a maintenance point-of-view.

Also, I don't have a garage, but might have access to one if necessary. What is the next best way to store my boat between uses if I don't have a garage to place it in?

Thanks for the help. I truly appreciate every opinion.

Short shank in short shaft are the same thing....I believe my explanation is the generic of the two...

Winterizing is a huge deal when it comes to boats. Basically it comes down to freezing and cracking things due to expansion. Outboard motors are subject to any water freezing in the water jacket (a diagram of water passages around the upward motor block that cools the engine in operation). Some people will dry run their motor for a few seconds upon trailering. I don't like that approach due to the water-pump getting damaged. Not a big deal, but I would not do it with a new motor. Most of the time you will be ok if you store the motor upright and there are no blockages in the cooling system.

Another issue is the lower unit (foot) of the motor cracking due to water intrusion. I see this more than anything. A new foot costs more than a replacement motor in most cases. Basically; just make sure you have good seals and heavy weight foot oil in the lower unit.

I think it is good to fog the engine cylinders if the motor sits for several months to prevent rust and other issues.

Also, make sure you drain your carburetor of gas in the valves and in the bowl if you are storing it. This causes ah about 90% of engine trouble. Some people run Stabil in the fuel lines; but, this will only give you a month or two more protection from fuel destabilization. Try to stay away from Ethanol gas for your outboard motors. If you have a left over fuel at the end of the season; consider it junk gas and recycle it appropriately. I try not to purchase too much gas at any one time when using an outboard motor. They use very little and you will rarely run low on a trip in our area.

Add some environmental RV Antifreeze to the bilge and suction enough to flush the system of inert water. Bilge pumps crack like a boiled egg right at 32 degrees. Same process for fish holds, etc....

Always store the motor upright. Keep your battery inside a garage or building. Store it full and recharge about once a month. Several ways to do this...

Trolling motors are bad to freeze and break the seals. What happens is that there is always a small amount that gets in to the motor compartment. If the motor is hung on the wall in the shed with the propeller up; it will not drain out and it will freeze and make the broken seals worse. Plus, any water that is left in there will slowly rust away the motor. Always store them with the propeller pitched downward.

That is about all I can think of...:biggrin:

gutshot
12-11-2010, 12:50 AM
You already have the best boat for the Caney fork river, but if you want a boat that can fish several people then I agree that the Arkansas style boats are the best for the application, imo. Get a short one however since the Caney has some very narrow places and making long casts to cover the river are not required as would be when fishing middle or lower sections of a river like the little red.

The best fishing approach on the Caney is drifting in your Kayak with the fly below you about 30 feet or getting out and wading. Additionally, you will scare a lot fewer big fish by paddling over them than by running an outboard past them. Can you catch them after doing both yep, but my percentages are better in the kayak.

SuperFly
12-11-2010, 02:36 PM
Ok. I have run into another question about boat registration. I was talking to someone about a boat that they had sitting in their back yard, and I offered to buy it. The hull was in good condition. No rust. Anyway, the sale fell through because the person told me that they didn't have the bill of sale, and I wouldn't be able to get it registered.

Is that true? I didn't know enough to dispute that, and I got the impression that the person didn't want to sell the boat even though they had rested the trailer on a tree stump so long that the stump grew around the trailer.

If what they say is true then I will just move on to another boat.

Thanks for the help.

Bfish
12-13-2010, 10:19 AM
You need to show sale tax was paid. Bill of sale can be written on a napkin/scrape piece of paper. Google "bill of sale" and you can get some samples.

OR you can tell the county clerk that you traded down for the boat.

http://www.tn.gov/twra/boatregistrations.html

MadisonBoats
12-14-2010, 09:42 AM
Try to find out the Make/Model if you can...? Also, there should be some serial numbers stamped on the transom or inside. You may have to scratch away at some paint. If you buy an unidentifiable boat; make it identifiable by putting your mark or your serial numbers on it.

*Be sure and carry insurance on your boat. You can get it with your automobile carrier at a discount and it usually costs around $30-50/year based on the value you are insuring. The personal liability is part of this coverage and it helps you relax a bit when carrying passengers.

Bran
12-14-2010, 12:52 PM
You should try craigs list and search the short shaft motors for your area. I bought a used rig a few years back and have really enjoyed it for my local river. It's a Carolina Skiff J14 with an Evinrude 18 Jet, which is the 25hp head on a Jet platform. I've dinged the glass finish on the boat a few times and came home and patched it with a glass kit (stinky stuff, I tell you) but nothing major. As far as that jet it just depends on if you have the luxury of motoring up to fish or not. I have several spots where the fishing is better downriver and there are few limits on the jet, it'll run in a ditch if it's raining good. I did find the whole setup used (in great shape) and give the guy 2200 for boat, jet outboard, and Long trailer. I thought it was a good deal, the motors worth that by itself. Keep looking, you'll find what you're after.

SuperFly
12-19-2010, 09:00 PM
I have been looking online for a boat, and have actually looked at a couple in person. Something I am running into is that a lot of them are not very wide. I remember troutman in this thread saying that I should look for a jon boat that is at least 42" but should get closer to 48".

Does the same go for semi v-hull boats like that starcraft that Troutman fixed up? What is a good width for one of those? I am seeing a lot of semi v-hulls online and am thinking that might be a way to go.

Are there any huge differences between a jon boat and a v-hull? It seems like a jon boat may have more room in the front, and it has a flatter bottom.

Thanks for all the advice. This is really helpful. I hope to be starting the new year on a boat restoration project of my own.

Bran
12-20-2010, 09:18 AM
The jon is more utility oriented, it's easier to load in a pickup and move about because nromally they're a good bit lighter than a V. On the other hand a V will ride much better on flat water, and for your smaller boats, say 14' and less, the V will be more stable. Both have their place for sure, a V is generally higher price wise and can be as much as twice the price of a similar size jon.
In the Jon boat side you have riveted and welded, and also a few companies that have made poly boats. My first Jon was a 14' 32" boat and it served me well for years on the river. I had a 15hp evinrude on it and it would fly! I eventually traded up to a 15' 46" and felt like I had moved into a castle! Keep in mind they're just like a basement or a storage building, no matter how big the boat is, you will aquire enough stuff to fill it up!!http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif
Eventually, you'll run out of room in that boat and you'll get a bigger one, and then you'll want both a V and a Jon, etc. You may not believe it now but trust me, it's just how it works!http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/images/icons/icon10.gif If you're married then prepare to spend twice as much, you'll have to buy her something every time you buy the boat something. (They're in competition you know).
Seriously, good luck, I'm sure if you love to be on the water like I do then it doesn't matter. You could be in a washtub and manage to have a good day!

Troutman
12-20-2010, 09:23 AM
mine measures 48" across the floor of my v-hull. Don't get in a hurry to buy. There are a couple of boat shows coming up in January in the Knoxville area which will get people thinking about upgrading to a new boat. They will need to sell the old rig not only for the money but to keep the peace with their spouse!
I went with a shallow v-hull because it was such a good deal for me. I fish rivers and lakes and I grew up fishing both types of water from a v-hull and it was never a problem getting around. Mine is flat on the bottom with the rounded edges on the sides. the front is a shallow v. It you went with a deep v-hull it would be fine on lakes but may drag more on rivers.
the shallow v hulls are very popular with crappie fishermen on the lakes and many have been around for decades of service. the flat bottoms became popular as duck hunting boats in the stump filled marshes of Ark. and La. and also as pond boats across the south. The v-hulls are still very popular up north and in the mid west but you don't seen them for sell on BPS parking lots across the south. Alumacraft, Lowe and G-3 still produce them as angler boats but you don't see them sitting in the showroom or on the lot. those spaces are reserved for flat jon duckboats and high speed 300hp. glass rigs.

Bran
01-05-2011, 12:49 PM
Gary, I hate I didn't get by to see you last week or even worse that we couldn't go wet a line! It was just too hectic with having only the one day and the crowds being so thick. It was a literal mess!! Tina and Emily had a good time though but I was some kinda tired of shopping when we got back to the motel Thursday evening. Hope you have a good new year and I hope to hook up with you for a Smallmouth hunt in June. We'll be out for 8 days then and have much more time to explore.---Bran

Troutman
01-11-2011, 12:06 PM
June will be a good time Bran. Let me know a week or so ahead and I'll take a day off and we'll float the river for Smallies., or take a hike in trip for some more brook trout .

Bran
01-11-2011, 10:55 PM
That sounds mighty good Gary! I'm already looking forward to it!

SuperFly
08-30-2011, 10:48 AM
Okay, It has been a while but I am getting to the point now where I am actively looking for a boat (under$1,000 preferably) and have run into a bit of an issue.

First off, I should say that my primary body of water would be the Caney Fork River, but I would take it to the Elk some, as well as out East to the smokies from time to time. That said, 75% of my fishing in this boat will be done on the Caney, Elk, or a lake.

Now, the problem is that I have received conflicting advice about whether to buy a flat bottom jon boat or buy a v-hull. Both are looking pretty doable for $1k or under (with some work needed), but I have been told that both have advantages and disadvantages (understandably). I just seem to be unclear as to what they are.

I would love it if someone could say "this boat is the best for what you need". Period. I think that it is going to come down more to personal preference though.

That said, what are some of the pros and cons of a flat bottom jon boat versus a v-hull? 14', 42" wide is what I am looking for. Thinking that the Caney Fork will see most of the action with my boat.

Thanks for the help guys.

JoelO
08-30-2011, 03:01 PM
Based on what I heard from alot of guys that fish the water you're talking about, a 14ft-16ft/42in-54in wide semi V jon boat would be the ticket. You don't want a deep V boat on the Caney or Elk...too shallow with the generators off. A semi V jon would be preferable over a flat bottom based on the comments I've heard from others.

BlueRaiderFan
09-02-2011, 11:17 PM
Several logs tied together...Huck Finn style...you're in.

Streamhound
09-03-2011, 12:49 PM
http://images-partners-tbn.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcShr17tcTS0c_413MSuFCUmrnZx7stCJ kLghRLxzdi83jTjtgbWk9tdBg:www.allmovia.com/c/242/242_5.jpg (http://search.aol.com/aol/imageDetails?s_it=imageDetails&q=african+queen+photo&img=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.allmovia.com%2Fc%2F242%2F242_ 5.jpg&v_t=client96_searchbox&host=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.allmovia.com%2Fmov%2Fthe_afr ican_queen%2F&width=127&height=97&thumbUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fimages-partners-tbn.google.com%2Fimages%3Fq%3Dtbn%3AANd9GcShr17tcT S0c_413MSuFCUmrnZx7stCJkLghRLxzdi83jTjtgbWk9tdBg%3 Awww.allmovia.com%2Fc%2F242%2F242_5.jpg&b=image%3Fq%3Dafrican%2Bqueen%2Bphoto%26v_t%3Dclie nt96_searchbox%26oreq%3De26dcbad90ee4ce7afc066c7bc 423c69&imgHeight=342&imgWidth=450&imgTitle=The+African+Queen+Movie&imgSize=45844&hostName=www.allmovia.com)

If it was good enough for Bogie...

SuperFly
09-07-2011, 02:38 PM
Yeah, that could work. And the benefit would be that you would never have to store it in the off season. You could just mulch it.

Still, a nice aluminum boat might be worth the trouble.