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shinbruiser
01-25-2011, 04:58 PM
I am embarrassed to ask but can't figure it out - what type of trout is pictured on the message board home page?

steamnsteel
01-25-2011, 05:30 PM
Here is the info on the above pic.

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13603&highlight=red+rainbow

GrouseMan77
01-25-2011, 05:35 PM
Here is the info on the above pic.

http://http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13603&highlight=red+rainbow

Link didn't work for me.

It's a rainbow.

NDuncan
01-25-2011, 05:39 PM
Try this fixed link for anyone who wants to read the thread about this.

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13603&highlight=red+rainbow

whitefeather
01-25-2011, 06:09 PM
I've never seen a rainbow with such vivid coloration especially on the gill plate. And its amber color, not a hint of green anywhere! Beautiful fiish indeed!

Whitefeather
_________________________________________________
Blue skies, warm gentle winds, and trout filled waters to all!:smile:

shinbruiser
01-25-2011, 06:09 PM
Thanks for the link. I don't feel quite so dumb now that I know there is a story behind it.

pineman19
01-25-2011, 07:10 PM
If my memory serves correct, it was caught on the Clinch River around a year ago. Can't remember who caught it. The colors are so bright from being caught during the rainbow spawn on the Clinch.

Neal

steamnsteel
01-26-2011, 12:06 AM
Try this fixed link for anyone who wants to read the thread about this.

http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13603&highlight=red+rainbow


Thanks for fixing my error, I was just leaving the office when I posted and just now did a follow up. I went ahead and fixed it also:biggrin:, reckon I should have proof read the link also.

Heavynets
01-26-2011, 09:26 AM
It looks like one of Oregon's redside trout to me. see link

http://mckenzierivernativetrout.org/photos/

Jim Casada
01-26-2011, 10:28 AM
pineman19 and shinbruiser--I asked Byron about this particular trout a good many months ago, because the exceptionally vibrant colors caught my attention. He told me the photo was taken by a friend of his and that the trout was a tailwater fish (I'm almost certain from the Clinch).

Some of the steelhead/lake run rainbows in Santeetlah have this kind of vibrant color when they make their fall runs, although those runs have now diminished to a very small faction of what they once were thanks to otters lying in wait at the mouth of Big Snowbird and Big Santeetlah.

The fish is sure a thing of beauty.

Jim Casada
www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com (http://www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com)

MadisonBoats
01-26-2011, 10:55 AM
Most trout have vibrant color if you can mask the polarization of the light on their slime-skin. Early morning lighting and late evening lighting are the best times to thwart polarization and to capture true color. Using a nice SLR correctly will give you great results too!

The key to getting good photographs on water is to mask polarization. I usually take several different photographs at different angles to try and overcome this problem.

ChemEAngler
01-26-2011, 09:19 PM
Most trout have vibrant color if you can mask the polarization of the light on their slime-skin. Early morning lighting and late evening lighting are the best times to thwart polarization and to capture true color. Using a nice SLR correctly will give you great results too!

The key to getting good photographs on water is to mask polarization. I usually take several different photographs at different angles to try and overcome this problem.

Shawn,
You are correct about the polarization. When carrying my DSLR on the water, which is probably 90% of the time, I have my circular polarizer attached. However, when carrying my compact point-n-shoot a simple trick is to place your polarized sunglasses over the front lens to reduce the glare on your subject.

Also, generally you get better color and contrast from holding your fish in the shade, and not snapping a picture at a 90 degree angle to the most vibrant colors. Generally when shooting at a 90 degree angle to the most vibrant colored side of the fish, the ambient lighting is being reflected off the fish and washes out the colors. Simply rotating the fish and shooting from a non-direct angle allows the colors to really pop.

MadisonBoats
01-27-2011, 10:38 AM
Shawn,
You are correct about the polarization. When carrying my DSLR on the water, which is probably 90% of the time, I have my circular polarizer attached. However, when carrying my compact point-n-shoot a simple trick is to place your polarized sunglasses over the front lens to reduce the glare on your subject.

Also, generally you get better color and contrast from holding your fish in the shade, and not snapping a picture at a 90 degree angle to the most vibrant colors. Generally when shooting at a 90 degree angle to the most vibrant colored side of the fish, the ambient lighting is being reflected off the fish and washes out the colors. Simply rotating the fish and shooting from a non-direct angle allows the colors to really pop.

Thanks Travis! I do not have a nice DSLR at the moment.:frown: However; I would probably destroy it considering my camera experience. I went through three cameras last year.

I will try your sunglass trick next time I am out. I am curious to see if it will work better with my compact camera. Thanks!
SM