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jeffnles1
03-25-2011, 09:59 PM
As promised, here are some shots of the finished flintlock.
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Fowler/P7130001.jpg
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Fowler/P7130003.jpg
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Fowler/P7130007.jpg

This is a link to the photo album showing the process from beginning to end.
http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Fowler/

Jeff

A while back, in another thread, I posted a picture of a rifle I built. I'm in the process of building another one (this will be number 18 for me) and I've decided to document each step along the way. I've never done that before.

Below is a link to the photo album of the progress so far if any of you guys are interested.

Jeff

http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Fowler/

buzzmcmanus
03-25-2011, 10:13 PM
What exactly is picture 11 and where do I get one?

jeffnles1
03-25-2011, 10:15 PM
What exactly is picture 11 and where do I get one?

Ah, yes, my favorite coffee cup. My wife got that for me at some craft show. She loves pottery and thought the cup kind of looked like me (or at least that's the story she told me). Love the cup and haven't seen another one like it but it really drinks well and it is kind of like looking into the mirror...

Jeff

ZachMatthews
03-25-2011, 10:20 PM
Could you post a link to the finished one from earlier too? Great job!

Zach

jeffnles1
03-25-2011, 10:37 PM
Could you post a link to the finished one from earlier too? Great job!

Zach

Zach,
Here you go.
http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Marshall/

The one in this link is a .58 calibre transitional Kentucky rifle. It's patterned off one from the late 1760's or early 1770's.

The one that I'm working on is a smooth bore 20 gauge (.62 cal) patterned off of a very common style gun used on the American Frontier from the early 1700's up through the early 1800's. This particular gun, when I'm finished, will hopefully look like one from about the 1750 period but there's still a lot of work to do on it to get it there.

It will not have the fancy carving and engraving as the rifle above as the fowlers / smoothbores were more "working man's" guns and the one in this link would have been owned by a man of some means.

Jeff

rivergal
03-26-2011, 08:08 AM
Great workmanship ! You are another Jacob Deckard ! Where would we be without those historic firearms?

jeffnles1
03-26-2011, 09:43 AM
Great workmanship ! You are another Jacob Deckard ! Where would we be without those historic firearms?

Rivergal, thanks.
I have had the privilidge of handling a few original Deckard rifles (sometimes also spelled Dickerd even by Jacob himself, he spelled his last name differently through his life).

While my goal is to be able to achieve his level of craftsmanship, I can say that I'm not there yet.:smile:

Jeff

gmreeves
03-26-2011, 10:14 AM
Very Cool!

Mundele
03-26-2011, 11:50 PM
Really nice work. I remember when I was little, looking through the Cabelas catalog seeing those kits, wanting to build one. Maybe one day.

--Matt

Knothead
03-27-2011, 04:08 PM
Where do you get your components for such a build?

jeffnles1
03-27-2011, 04:54 PM
Where do you get your components for such a build?

John,
These last 2, I got from Jim Chambers (www.flintlocks.com (http://www.flintlocks.com)). This rifle is, I believe number 18 for me, could be number 19, kind of loose track after a while.

I've bought components from a lot of sources. Typically, I walk around commercial row at the NMLRA National Shoots and start picking out parts that go together for whatever rifle I have visioned in my mind.

I have arthritis in my hands pretty bad now so the days of cutting stocks from a square block of wood are pretty much over so I get the stocks that are rough shaped. I usually do some pretty heavy modifications on the stocks and hardware to suit what is in my mind at the time. I've been fortunate enough to mess around with a lot of old original flintlocks so usually have a pretty decent idea of where I'm going to go when I start a project. As with most projects, not all end up where I had intended when I started but after a while, you realize there are few mistakes that can't be salvaged. I've come to believe that is why one sees different originals from the same maker with some vastly different features. He started on something, goofed up and had to change directions in the middle.:biggrin:

Since Jim only sells flintlocks and rifle parts, I reckon he's not in any kind of competition with LRO.

Ms. Paula or Byron, let me know and I'll remove the link if it's a problem for you guys. I don't think Jim even fishes or if he does, I've never heard him say anything about it.

Jeff

jeffnles1
07-13-2011, 09:55 PM
update in first post.

here's the album of the finished product.
http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b110/jeffnles1/Fowler/

flyman
07-13-2011, 10:28 PM
Really nice, I love old firearms:smile:

jeffnles1
07-13-2011, 10:47 PM
flyman,
Thanks. This flinglock fowler is patterned after guns on the American frontier from the 1750's up till the early 1800's. My thinking on this one was to make a gun representatige of the 1760-1780 period.

Jeff

Streamhound
07-15-2011, 12:22 PM
Great post
Years ago many of the old Explorer Post and Scout Camp staff were into building blackpowder rifles and guns and frontier living. I was a little too young at the time. Thanks for the posts

Ky Tim
07-15-2011, 05:27 PM
Jeff, those look great. I am wanting two flintlocks in the future, a deer rifle and a shotgun for turkey. I have taken both deer and turkey with my longbow, but would like to try it with a flintlock.

jeffnles1
07-15-2011, 11:44 PM
Jeff, those look great. I am wanting two flintlocks in the future, a deer rifle and a shotgun for turkey. I have taken both deer and turkey with my longbow, but would like to try it with a flintlock.
KY Tim, that gun I just finished would easily serve both purposes in a single piece.

It is a .62 cal smoothbore. .62cal is also known as 20 gauge. It can shoot shot or it can shoot a single round ball.

For deer, a .62 roundball will anchor one with a single well placed shot pretty quickly. A smoothbore is just as good as a rifle out to about 50 yards.

With shot, it's a 20 gauge shotgun. No choke but with a 46" barrel, the shot pattern is acceptable. At the ranges you're shooting turkey it would absolutely do the trick.

Cool thing about a muzzle loader is you can load them as hot or as mild as you want (within reason in both directions of course).

Just a thought.

Jeff