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lauxier
09-13-2011, 07:36 PM
which type wading boots are best for wading slick rocks,like the ones that thrive in Abrams--I have felt bottomed oldies that have about had it...want a shoe that is light but as grippy as possible--have not followed the evolution of wading boots for a while--any suggestions?? Has Waterworks Reel Co. gone out of business??I need another reel and have always used Ross and Waterworks,I like Waterworks reels because they are light.Is Lamson and Waterworks the same?Will be in Townsend in about 2 weeks,at which time I hope to stop by LRO and purchase a reel and wading boots.

pineman19
09-13-2011, 07:49 PM
which type wading boots are best for wading slick rocks,like the ones that thrive in Abrams--I have felt bottomed oldies that have about had it...want a shoe that is light but as grippy as possible--have not followed the evolution of wading boots for a while--any suggestions?? Has Waterworks Reel Co. gone out of business??I need another reel and have always used Ross and Waterworks,I like Waterworks reels because they are light.Is Lamson and Waterworks the same?Will be in Townsend in about 2 weeks,at which time I hope to stop by LRO and purchase a reel and wading boots.

Waterworks is still in business. I just got a Litespeed 2 reel, they are closing them out, them have made some changes to next years model. A good time to get a great deal on a nice reel if that's what you're looking for.

Neal

MadisonBoats
09-13-2011, 08:32 PM
Man, that is a pretty tough challenge when you are talking about Abrams Creek. I know one thing; do not buy the new Simms Eco Boots with Vibram Sole. It is the closest thing to wearing ice skates you will find.:eek:

pineman19
09-13-2011, 09:05 PM
Waterworks is still in business. I just got a Litespeed 2 reel, they are closing them out, them have made some changes to next years model. A good time to get a great deal on a nice reel if that's what you're looking for.

Neal

And yes, Waterworks is the same as Lamson.

Neal

Trico
09-13-2011, 09:29 PM
I have two pair of Simms Headwaters Wading Shoes. One with felt and the other with the rubber soles with studs. I have been very pleased with this boot. On slate and shale which is moss covered like our local steelhead streams the rubber soles with the studs really work. I have used rubber soles in Tenn. on both the Holston and South Holston and thought they worked fine. From my limited experience with them I think the rubber soles really need the studs.

LA MantaRay12
09-13-2011, 09:51 PM
Have you ever thought about Korky's? I like the fact that you can purchase multiple soles for the boots. You can have multiple felt soles if you fish multiple places to keep the transfer of biomaterials at bay.

I have a pair that I use to hike in with rubber soles and fish in with felt.

duckypaddler
09-14-2011, 08:01 AM
Have you ever thought about Korky's? I like the fact that you can purchase multiple soles for the boots. You can have multiple felt soles if you fish multiple places to keep the transfer of biomaterials at bay.

I have a pair that I use to hike in with rubber soles and fish in with felt.

Might want to check & see how the Korker's hold up. Crockett was saying how his were falling apart.

I just got a new pair of Chota wading shoes with grippy rubber bottom, my first pair that wenen't felt. After 5 minutes in the streambed, I quickly figured out that they will not be getting much use. I never fish Abrams, but would want felt anywhere else. Might want a felt pair that accepts studs. My Chota STX(?) have held up to 2 years of constant abuse which includes hikes in & out.

kentuckytroutbum
09-14-2011, 08:16 AM
According to Byron's Fishing Report about 1 1/2 months ago, Simms is bringing back their felt boots, because of demand.

Orvis still has one line of felt boots. I bought a pair around two years ago when my old pair of boots blew out the sole after about 8 years of hard use. Fortunately, the local fly shop had a pair of Orvis boots in my size, or else my fishing trip would have been over.

Bill

Crockett
09-14-2011, 09:06 AM
Duckypaddler is right I got a pair of korkers the cross current ones in fall of 09 and they were coming apart at the toe seams by last summer. I sent them back to the guy at korkers and he sent me a brand new pair. The new pair is now coming apart just where the old ones did. I am switching to simms, chota or something now not going to korkers again.

One other thing I will say about the korkers the felt inserts leave about a half inch or so gap around the edge of your foot that has no felt coverage and that causes me to slip a lot more than with other felt wading boots. I love the concept of the inserts though.

yonder
09-14-2011, 09:08 AM
I use the simms rubber soled boots WITH the studs. These are really good boots to wear, especially on those long five mile hikes into the upper waters. I do not recommend them without the studs under any condition whatsoever. Might as well be wearing rollerskates. I honestly believe that studded felt will be my next purchase, depending on future enviromental concerns and regulations. My 2 cents....

Rog 1
09-14-2011, 10:47 AM
Man, that is a pretty tough challenge when you are talking about Abrams Creek. I know one thing; do not buy the new Simms Eco Boots with Vibram Sole. It is the closest thing to wearing ice skates you will find.:eek:

The same goes for the new Chota Rocky River boots...took three of the worst falls in 50 yrs of fishing the Park in these boots in one morning....it's been 3 months and I am still waiting for my last rib to heal completely...rather than ice skates these boots are like walking with ball bearings on the sole....if you don't want to go with felt try the Bean stealth rubber sole wading boots...these work pretty good and after fishing in the Chotas I felt like Spider Man when I put my old boots back on

tnflyfisher
09-14-2011, 11:04 AM
I know one thing; do not buy the new Simms Eco Boots with Vibram Sole. It is the closest thing to wearing ice skates you will find.:eek:

From what I have experienced, MB is spot on ... I will not wear these boots on anything other than a moderate, easy to wade tailwater or stillwater. The minute you throw in strong currents and slick conditions, you are going for a ride if you don't watch out!

From my limited experience with them I think the rubber soles really need the studs.

Again, I have these boots and yes, even bought the aluminum cleats. It feels great for all of 5 minutes until they wear down and then they become very slick, smooth nubs of metal. It actually makes things worse IMO and I took them off after a couple trips to the river. If you wade the Caney or Elk River like I do, I will use the vibrams and get by but I still don't fully have 100% confidence in my footing. My worst experience so far was after I bought them and about killed myself on the Tellico River earlier this Spring. Now, that was brand new boots right off the shelf and the traction just plain sucked (ice skates) and was downright scary! Results may vary from person to person but just trying to help inform the community from someone who has actually used and fished in these.

Might want to check & see how the Korker's hold up. Crockett was saying how his were falling apart.


Now, there have been several different models of Korkers here recently and I believe there are again new models here for 2011. There are plenty of stories of poor design in the past and questionable durability and that is what has held me back as well. That was until I was told that this new line has it together and so I took a chance... I will say that for $99 I have been satisfied so far. I am back in felt and tromping threw the woods and up and down streams, rock-hopping with my focus now on fishing and not so much on my footing. I am not easy on my gear at all and after 4 trips to the park I have seen no signs of wear. They are lightweight and not as much support as other boots so they feel somewhat "soft" but they do the job. I feel this is a plus because even when wet they still don't feel that they weigh me down much at all, just keep on fishin' ...

Some minor annoyances include keeping the bolo laces tucked away and my gravel guard socks don't seem to stay "hooked" down to the toe clip that well but has nothing to do with the traction the boots provide. Also, my boots do have full edge to edge felt coverage except for about an inch in the toe area where the insert locks in to the boot sole. Not trying to push the K's but I do feel somewhat cheated by Simms for this great looking expensive boot that I can't even use .. :rolleyes:

Tight Lines,

ahighlan
09-14-2011, 08:03 PM
I've been pretty happy with my Chota STLs.

fearnofishbob
09-14-2011, 10:40 PM
Chota STX are my current boots. My old Abrams Creek came apart after about a year of steady use and I was reluctant to try the STXs but I did and they are falling apart also after 14 months. I called the Knoxville office and they offered to have them sewn but I figured with postage rates I could get the repaired locally for about the same $$. I use 6-7 cleats per boot ( I think they hold 12-14 per boot) and I have mixed thoughts about them. Sometimes I think the cleats really help and other times I'm not sure. I take them off and put them back on.......still undecided !! The boots are very comfortable and if Chota would ever get their act together on the sewing they would have a great boot !!!!!
Thats my thoughts on the subject

tjw37909
09-15-2011, 06:54 PM
I have fished Abrams with Simms vibram sole boots equipped with the aluminum alumsbit cleat and they grip very well, better than felt on that particular stream

pineman19
09-15-2011, 07:05 PM
From what I have experienced, MB is spot on ... I will not wear these boots on anything other than a moderate, easy to wade tailwater or stillwater. The minute you throw in strong currents and slick conditions, you are going for a ride if you don't watch out!



Again, I have these boots and yes, even bought the aluminum cleats. It feels great for all of 5 minutes until they wear down and then they become very slick, smooth nubs of metal. It actually makes things worse IMO and I took them off after a couple trips to the river. If you wade the Caney or Elk River like I do, I will use the vibrams and get by but I still don't fully have 100% confidence in my footing. My worst experience so far was after I bought them and about killed myself on the Tellico River earlier this Spring. Now, that was brand new boots right off the shelf and the traction just plain sucked (ice skates) and was downright scary! Results may vary from person to person but just trying to help inform the community from someone who has actually used and fished in these.



Now, there have been several different models of Korkers here recently and I believe there are again new models here for 2011. There are plenty of stories of poor design in the past and questionable durability and that is what has held me back as well. That was until I was told that this new line has it together and so I took a chance... I will say that for $99 I have been satisfied so far. I am back in felt and tromping threw the woods and up and down streams, rock-hopping with my focus now on fishing and not so much on my footing. I am not easy on my gear at all and after 4 trips to the park I have seen no signs of wear. They are lightweight and not as much support as other boots so they feel somewhat "soft" but they do the job. I feel this is a plus because even when wet they still don't feel that they weigh me down much at all, just keep on fishin' ...

Some minor annoyances include keeping the bolo laces tucked away and my gravel guard socks don't seem to stay "hooked" down to the toe clip that well but has nothing to do with the traction the boots provide. Also, my boots do have full edge to edge felt coverage except for about an inch in the toe area where the insert locks in to the boot sole. Not trying to push the K's but I do feel somewhat cheated by Simms for this great looking expensive boot that I can't even use .. :rolleyes:

Tight Lines,

In regards to Korkers, I have the older Wetland and Outfitter models and one of this years new models, The Redside. I had issues from the start with the older model Korkers, stitching coming apart in several areas. The Redsides are a much better boot IMO. Have done several day hikes (7-8 miles per trip) and have had no issues so far. The changeable soles are improved, the felt goes all the way to the edge. I have tried the rubber soles (without cleats) several times on some relatively easy water, traction is poor compared to felt on Smokies streams. I am curious about the new svelte soles. Maybe I'll try a pair next year to see how they compare with felt.

Neal

lauxier
09-15-2011, 09:47 PM
I cracked my elbow,when i slipped on a slippery rock,not too far from the campground on the lake end of Abrams,that was in 1982.I was wearing"tennis shoes",and wet wading Abrams,my elbow still pains me ever so often and my wading boots have had it..Guess I'll leave it to LRO..will be sneaking in there soon...hope LRO has wading boots that'll fit a 60 year old with a stiff elbow...

fearnofishbob
09-15-2011, 09:56 PM
Ops !! mine are STLs not STXs ...didn't meant to confuse anyone.......sorryaboutthat

nvr2L8
09-16-2011, 08:08 PM
I have the new style Korkers (came out in January, I believe) - a Christmas present from my son. Big improvements from the old style. The felt soles now go all the way out to the edge of the boot. They snap into the boot with tabs and do not require the tool that the old style did. And they have a tougher reinforced toe that looks like Rhino Liner for a truck bed - a rough rubberized hard toe. They also have the dialed wire lacing system like a ski boot. So far, so good.

MadisonBoats
09-17-2011, 08:51 AM
Here is a picture of my Simms-Blackfoot Boot Vibrams. These are about six-months old. The forefoot tread area is noticable worn it becomes extremely slick on large rocks or bare areas of rock substrate. It does ok in pebble type rocks and gravel. You can see that the fabric at the top of the boots has worn off and most of the brown material has areas that have eroded. Another thing about these boots is that they limit my mobility. I think this is intended to protect your ankles from getting turned or sprained. However; I have found that I trip over more rocks than in previous boots. It could be that I have some paralysis in my left leg/foot.:rolleyes: I am a big fan of Simms Products; but, I think I would go after felt bottoms the next time around.
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/310518_10150393369113319_718858318_10053279_415198 331_n.jpg

LA MantaRay12
09-24-2011, 09:17 AM
WOW had no idea there were so many issues with the older Korker's!! I do not wear mine nearly as often as you folks do because most of my river fishing is not rock bed due to my location in South Alabama...glad to hear some rumblings that the newer Korker's have been improved.

these types of discussions are very helpful to me for future purchases. Thanks for all the input

Knothead
09-24-2011, 03:16 PM
If the boot is still good, you can get replacement felt soles. Check out Cabela's or some similar mail order house.