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Waterborn
04-11-2012, 09:35 PM
Having spent last couple of outings down at the jail, I decided to venture up to Millers and have a look see Tues. The last time I was there the rock snot was so bad, I literally turned around and left. Hated seeing that khaki color stream bed and toilet paper hatch. Anyhow, I arrived just as the water was dropping. After chatting with a newly retired gentlemen who gets to fish everyday (to be so lucky)- I hit river right with a pheasant tail. Plying the usual runs, sizable bows were definitely taking advantage of the diminishing flow. Several slot fish gave a great fight and some of the smaller bows had some pudge to them. Not sure if it was egg laden females, or just typical chunks.
When the water dropped, it seemed lower than what I remembered. I kept an eye out for redds, but didn't notice any. Not saying that there weren't any around - so hopefully I wasn't that guy Shawn mentioned.
I found a slot of feeding fish and managed a few on a blackfly dry. The water being slow and gin clear, those fish were wise to my game fairly quick. The wind also started to pick up with some irritating gusts. Wanting to move down, there were people in every hole, so headed over river left. Fish were rising all over and not a soul around. I broke out a caddis, and began picking up fish about every other cast. Pods of jake browns - mostly cookie cutter 12" - were a blast to round out the afternoon. Every now and then a sizable, renegade bow would stir the water into a froth trying to throw that hook. Got to love surprises. Maybe not too surprising was a very sporatic sulphur hatch, don't know if I'd call it a hatch per say, but there were some fluttering about.
Some pudge
http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j150/Waterbornjournal/P4090005.jpg
Jake - nice teeth
http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j150/Waterbornjournal/P4100015.jpg
This guys had been caught alot, Inoticed alot of hook damage on the other side...
http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j150/Waterbornjournal/P4090012.jpg

troutslayer3393
04-11-2012, 10:02 PM
Nice Report! Those are some healthy lookin fish. The water looks good too

mstone
04-11-2012, 10:07 PM
Nice report. Have not been up to the island in a long time. Did fish the section at the jail last week with poor results. Can't wait for the sulphur hatch to get cranked up. I seemed to notice that there was not much didymo in those lower sections like there was at one time.

MadisonBoats
04-12-2012, 09:23 AM
When the water dropped, it seemed lower than what I remembered. I kept an eye out for redds, but didn't notice any. Not saying that there weren't any around - so hopefully I wasn't that guy Shawn mentioned.

The Miller's area is laden with Redds and they will become more apparent in the next few weeks. I was not trying to be condescending in my spawn post; just wanted to share an FYI for those that are interested. I really do not think fishermen walking on the beds are their biggest risk. Just something to think about and be aware of...

Fish were rising all over and not a soul around. I broke out a caddis, and began picking up fish about every other cast.
I like to fish small dry caddis flies as midge imatations. The float and present super well. Plus, the fish seem to not care if they are caddis or midges. Note; midge emergers (18-20) have been working very well for me when fishing to a rise. Even though you cannot see the fly; let it present and keep your line ready for a take. Also; dropper rigs are good to get those bottom fish. I like to use a splitshot drop ahead of a nymph.

Mundele
04-12-2012, 11:36 AM
MadisonBoats are you fishing these emerger midges with a strike indicator?

The Miller's area is laden with Redds and they will become more apparent in the next few weeks. I was not trying to be condescending in my spawn post; just wanted to share an FYI for those that are interested. I really do not think fishermen walking on the beds are their biggest risk. Just something to think about and be aware of...
I like to fish small dry caddis flies as midge imatations. The float and present super well. Plus, the fish seem to not care if they are caddis or midges. Note; midge emergers (18-20) have been working very well for me when fishing to a rise. Even though you cannot see the fly; let it present and keep your line ready for a take. Also; dropper rigs are good to get those bottom fish. I like to use a splitshot drop ahead of a nymph.

MadisonBoats
04-12-2012, 01:20 PM
MadisonBoats are you fishing these emerger midges with a strike indicator?

No, just fish them by feel. I miss a few; but, they seem to take more without an indicator hovering close by...Also; I probably get half of my takes when I start to reset my cast.

Waterborn
04-12-2012, 08:00 PM
I was not trying to be condescending in my spawn post; just wanted to share an FYI for those that are interested. I really do not think fishermen walking on the beds are their biggest risk. Just something to think about and be aware of...

Oh, I wasn't taking it as being condescending - not at all. I was merely pointing out that I may have been blissfully unaware. Though I know a redd when I see one, I was just thrilled to be out and about... but I think its a good message to tune in during the spring bows and fall browns spawning seasons...

I like to fish small dry caddis flies as midge imatations. The float and present super well. Plus, the fish seem to not care if they are caddis or midges. Note; midge emergers (18-20) have been working very well for me when fishing to a rise. Even though you cannot see the fly; let it present and keep your line ready for a take. Also; dropper rigs are good to get those bottom fish. I like to use a splitshot drop ahead of a nymph.

I actually do use a small elk hair ( Tiemco 501 #22) for both a midge and black fly dry. I hate fooling with that small of hackle so goin x caddis style works just as good. I know that in spring there are some sizable caddis that do come off and as well as those fish were feeding, I figured why not. Lot of times I'll fish a caddis with a midge emerger dropper, or a with sulpher and so on, but with just enough tag to keep the emerger in the upper column. Another way to do it, is do the indicator and shot, then lengthen your distance from the shot to your emerger - then the key here is frogs fanny your emerger. It'll float up tethered and the fanny puts a bubbly sheath on the fly and reinforces the emerging look. High sticking works, but I usually do that in the park.
Thanks for the replies guys...

MadisonBoats
04-13-2012, 07:26 AM
...........I actually do use a small elk hair ( Tiemco 501 #22) for both a midge and black fly dry. I hate fooling with that small of hackle so goin x caddis style works just as good. I know that in spring there are some sizable caddis that do come off and as well as those fish were feeding, I figured why not. Lot of times I'll fish a caddis with a midge emerger dropper, or a with sulpher and so on, but with just enough tag to keep the emerger in the upper column. Another way to do it, is do the indicator and shot, then lengthen your distance from the shot to your emerger - then the key here is frogs fanny your emerger. It'll float up tethered and the fanny puts a bubbly sheath on the fly and reinforces the emerging look. High sticking works, but I usually do that in the park.
Thanks for the replies guys...

Nice setup~I bet it works very well. Thanks for sharing and taking the time to post it...

AL trout bum
04-13-2012, 01:42 PM
Nice pictures and fish!

appalachian angler
04-15-2012, 03:10 PM
It sure is nice to have the Clinch back ain't it? Thanks for sharing your success with us!

Mike

Rockyraccoon
04-17-2012, 12:45 AM
I probably get half of my takes when I start to reset my cast.

The old swing up off the bottom technique. Deadly for sure.

bhrt
04-17-2012, 05:04 PM
It sure is nice to have the Clinch back ain't it? Thanks for sharing your success with us!

Mike

Or lack therof! I spent a few hours Saturday morning after the 9-10 pulse and had no luck. There was no obvious activity as the water drained down the first 90 minutes. As the water stabilized I started seeing rises but no obvious hatch.

Tried the following:
No indicator, standard size midge
Wooly Booger (sp?) as the water was still a bit high from the 1 gen pulse
Midge with pheasent tail dropper
Midge under indicator

Checked the fly periodically and routinly had snot coverage so I assumed I was getting deep enough. Maybe too deep?

Only action was when something nailed my indicator! Will use a small dry from now on as has been suggested here.

There were a few folks out but not combat fishing by any means. Saw a few others have success but it appeared most of us were flailing away. Felt if I had another hour may have had some luck, however if I stayed another hour the boss may restrict future trips!

I'll figure out this river yet.

Waterborn
04-17-2012, 05:21 PM
Yeah, it can be frustrating sometimes...the good ol' Grinch as its sometimes called. Really though, 90% of the time I'm fishing and indicator, shot, and pt/midge dropper combo. Most of the time its just a midge, but since its spring and sulphur are about to be full throttle, a small pt will usually get more action for me this time of year. When I see rises I'll switch accordingly. On falling water I have to add some shot to get the fly down, if I'm catching grass (or snot) then I'll drop the indicator a couple of inches. A scud is a good falling water fly too, though I mainly use em on overcast days.
Sometimes fresh stockers will have a field day on indicators - slap a hook on it just for grins...at any rate, your determination to figure it out and that you are attentive to whats going on the water already has you ahead of the game...won't be long.

Flat Fly n
04-17-2012, 06:29 PM
a sulphur colored X-caddis with a brown Z-lon tail(shuck) will work in a sulphur hatch as well......heck, their just fish!

fourx
04-17-2012, 07:05 PM
Early last week I was fishing around 61 bridge. About 3-4 in the afternoon a zillion empty nymphal shucks came pouring down the river. Enough to indicate a significant hatch somewhere upstream. I also fished this weekend and never saw more than a few shucks here and there. My question is: has anyone seen a good hatch from say, peach orchard to cold water? I mean a zillion shucks that one day (mon. after Easter). Phil? Rodney?

4X

ChemEAngler
04-17-2012, 08:23 PM
Early last week I was fishing around 61 bridge. About 3-4 in the afternoon a zillion empty nymphal shucks came pouring down the river. Enough to indicate a significant hatch somewhere upstream. I also fished this weekend and never saw more than a few shucks here and there. My question is: has anyone seen a good hatch from say, peach orchard to cold water? I mean a zillion shucks that one day (mon. after Easter). Phil? Rodney?

4X

I saw a couple of sulfurs coming off on Friday afternoon down low. But, there was not a significant amount of surface activity anywhere. Not many shucks either. All fish were caught on a #16 BHPT.

Rodonthefly
04-17-2012, 08:37 PM
Early last week I was fishing around 61 bridge. About 3-4 in the afternoon a zillion empty nymphal shucks came pouring down the river. Enough to indicate a significant hatch somewhere upstream. I also fished this weekend and never saw more than a few shucks here and there. My question is: has anyone seen a good hatch from say, peach orchard to cold water? I mean a zillion shucks that one day (mon. after Easter). Phil? Rodney?

4X

Shoot me a email, I'll give ya the skinny:biggrin:

Corbo
04-18-2012, 07:13 AM
Well; SM and me floated from the peach orchard to 61 on Saturday and it was fabulous... a few fish were rising to midges but we primarily soaked beadhead Quasi PT's under an indicator with awesome sucess.

We counted a few dozen sulphurs over the day; no fish rising to them.

If you are hooking snot choke up, too deep.

My observation after a zillion years fly fishing is that a lot of BEHAVIORAL DRIFT occurs in the weeks prior to the main Sulphur hatch... essentially the sulphur nymphs swim up into the water column, drift on the current and settle back to bottom.... My guess is that they are letting the current take them to an area more suitable for real emergence OR they are "practicing" their swim-up technique. Don't know for certain but the trout key in on this behavior readily.

A couple weeks ago on the Holston I had more rises to my white Palsa indicator than to the dry's I tried! Go figure?

Flat Fly n
04-18-2012, 10:02 PM
I have not seen anything but a sparse hatch but the fish are busting a PTN I am tying right now so I will try to remain calm about dry fly fishing until the time comes. I do know the swallows are showing up in the afternoon about 3pm so they are checking as well. The grass is as thick with nymphs as I have seen in a while so soon.

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee78/tnflyfish/5eaaee80.jpg

appalachian angler
04-18-2012, 10:44 PM
I caught 5 slot rainbows and 1 slot brown at the church working the seams with a pheasant tail soft hackle 12" below a yarn indie and a modified PT nymph on a dropper 6" off the bend of the softie. ALL fish took the nymph. Later, as the birds started working, even with nearly no adults to be seen, fish started smashing my soft hackle when fished alone and swung down and accross. This was yesterday(tues).

Not sure what Corbo meant by 'behavioral drift' but perhaps the nymphs are going through an instar where they shed their shuck in favor of thier new body growth. No matter, the trout certainly must notice. In Shawns' video, trout can be seen swiping what appear to be nymphs in mid water column. I seldom, on the Clinch need to suspend a nymph below and indicator more than 24". More often than not, merely 16" is adequate to get the bite. I use as small a piece of yarn that I can get away with. I realy like that Loon Outdoors "Strike Two" yarn in flourescent chartruese/yellow or whatever that color is. The stuff floats like no other and needs NO treatment to keep it floating. I often save the used pieces and get another round out of them!

here's a recipe for my most successfull "sulpher" nymph to date:

Hook: TMC 3769 sz 14
Thread: 8/0 yellow UNI
Tail: wood duck fibers, fanned
Abdomen: palmered natural pheasant tail (about 4 fibers only)
Rib: Hot Yellow Ultra Wire sz small, counter wrapped
Thorax: Hares' Ear dubbing; mix of all hair from the mask tied in a loose dubbing loop
Wing Case: natural colored slip of Canada goose wing secondary coated with Salley Hansen's HAN
Head: gold sz 3/32 tung bead
Hint: Tie this nymph slight, as if it were being tied on a sz 16 hook

Mike

BigMax
04-18-2012, 11:49 PM
I fished today on the south side of miller island down towards the end of the island....got there around 3 and it was still real cloudy but by 4 the sun was out the swallows were out and the fish were smashing something on the top of the water. i started with my usual nymphs and below a yard indicator but didnt get hit. I noticed a few of these bugs coming off the water (see the pic below) but never saw a trout eat one.....im guessing they were choking on something else but im not sure what. After failing with the nymphs i started using a comparadun size 18 then a size 16 elk hair caddis (similar size to the bugs i was seeing) and had a few fish hit but but nothing steady....i started getting frustrated especially since i have been wearing em out lately. In an act of desperation or just boredom of watching the drift i tied on a black non weighted woolly bugger and started catching a fish every other cast..... they were all smallish but fun and almost all brookies. Im not sure there is anything dumber than a clinch brookie, but atleast they ate my hook.

im still a little confused what the trout were eating and im looking for insight. I dont think they were eating sulfers or any other largish hatch. so were they eating emergers or nymphs?

here is what was hatching about a size 16
http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr180/mtrent11/clinchbug.jpg

a small brookie...dumb but pretty
http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr180/mtrent11/clinchbrookie.jpg

Corbo
04-20-2012, 08:18 AM
I have googled "BEHAVIORAL DRIFT" for those that care.

Essentially mayflies and many other aquatic insects are prone to swimming up from the stream bottom (often in masse) and allow the current to sweep them downstream... perhaps to areas with better feeding conditions or to move to an area better suited to true emergence. During this time these "swiming nymphs" are quite vulnerable to feeding trout that find them an easy meal.

Over the years I have noticed that in the weeks prior to various major hatches the use of nymphs that suggest behavior drift work like gangbusters. This past weekend I never tied on a dry or used a dry dropper rig but went immediately to a BHPT 34 inches under a palsa and didn't not stray from the strategy all day.

http://seekingtrout.com/2011/04/21/behavioral-drift-of-aquatic-insects/

You might do further googling to better understand the phenomena.

Tight lines.

Richard

Silverfish
04-20-2012, 09:03 AM
Enjoyed fishing with you yesterday. Your insight into the river and flies was interesting. Maybe we can hook up again. Thanks again. Joe

MadisonBoats
04-20-2012, 11:13 AM
..i started getting frustrated especially since i have been wearing em out lately. In an act of desperation or just boredom of watching the drift i tied on a black non weighted woolly bugger and started catching a fish every other cast.....

im still a little confused what the trout were eating and im looking for insight. I dont think they were eating sulfers or any other largish hatch. so were they eating emergers or nymphs?

here is what was hatching about a size 16
http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr180/mtrent11/clinchbug.jpg


:biggrin: You know what that pretty little gem is...:)

Go small on your indicator if you are using yarn as it can distract the fish this time of year. I prefer stickies right now as Corbo has turned me on to them.

Try these flies on a 2'-3' drop.


Black Fly with puff (reliable)

BWO Biot Nymph
October Caddis Nymph [Works great right now for a sulfur nymph] (Hottest for big trout on the bottom)

Quasimodo PHT (Hot)

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_7Ds6k_LjSK4/TLpZ55LLNfI/AAAAAAAAA4Y/Azcs0-du-Uk/s1600/Black_Fly_Larva_001.jpg
http://planettrout.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/split-case-baetis_4_.jpg
http://www.ginkandgasoline.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/october-caddis-pupa-pattern.jpghttp://www.umpqua.com/images/PRODUCT/medium/522.jpg

appalachian angler
04-20-2012, 09:29 PM
Joe,

It was a pleasure fishing and chatting with you too! Hope you are having a good visit with your son!

Shawn,

I noticed on your list of flies BWO nymphs. Funny, I was talking to a guy Thurdsday afternoon at millers who said he ran into some BWo's on the left side of the island. I pulled what looked to be a sz 18 BWO nymph from my wading boot. Darker olive on its back side and lighter on the bottom side. It was very flat and even colored. No distinctly darker wing pads like the sulpher nymphs I am more familiar with. I have never seen BWO adults on the clinch. Anyone else witnessing some BWO's?

Mike

MadisonBoats
04-21-2012, 09:38 AM
Shawn,

I noticed on your list of flies BWO nymphs. Funny, I was talking to a guy Thurdsday afternoon at millers who said he ran into some BWo's on the left side of the island. I pulled what looked to be a sz 18 BWO nymph from my wading boot. Darker olive on its back side and lighter on the bottom side. It was very flat and even colored. No distinctly darker wing pads like the sulpher nymphs I am more familiar with. I have never seen BWO adults on the clinch. Anyone else witnessing some BWO's?

Mike

I see them often when I am looking for them. However; they are not as prolific compared to some of the Upper E. TN Region. Also; they are usually in the clinger state when you find them-unless they have molted.

No Hackle
04-22-2012, 08:19 AM
I've only seen them on the upper river and then only a few. Fish never seem to notice the duns. I'm sure the nymph gets eaten though. I've done good on small bhpt.
Lynn

Flat Fly n
04-23-2012, 07:03 PM
good idea on smaller indicator. Avoid the charteuse and TN Vol colors. If your using an indicator where there is no foam in the river you can always color the yarn gray with a marker. IF they start hitting your indicator more than the nymph, well then switch over the dry.

PS....false cast less, catch more.

Please remember to drop TWRA a line every now and then and thank them for the slots. What has been given, can be taken away.

waterwolf
05-09-2012, 08:42 PM
I see them often when I am looking for them. However; they are not as prolific compared to some of the Upper E. TN Region. Also; they are usually in the clinger state when you find them-unless they have molted.


Clingers are clingers and swimmers are swimmers.

Clinger type nymphs stay that way until they emerge and hatch into adults.

Swimmers stay that way until they emerge and hatch into adults.

Clingers don't molt into swimmers, and swimmers don't molt into clingers.

I would love to see Blue Wings come on, on the Clinch and have personally never seen an adult or a nymph anywhere on the river. That doesn't mean they aren't there, just that I have not personally seen one.

There used to be all sorts of weird hatches decades ago, but they seem to have waned over time. Naturally I don't fish much until summer, so they may still be happening for all I know.

Corbo
05-09-2012, 10:58 PM
I would like to see TWRA stock the Clinch with Caddis flies and BWO's. Would also like the orangy Sulphurs from the SOHO in the Clinch. Red Quills and hendricksons would be a bonus.

I don't see how this would be impossible; just pick off a few zillion from rocks in the other rivers and move them to the Clinch.

What I cannot figure out is how the SOHO has sulphurs through December and the clinch does not?

MadisonBoats
05-10-2012, 12:41 AM
Clingers are clingers and swimmers are swimmers.

Clinger type nymphs stay that way until they emerge and hatch into adults.

Swimmers stay that way until they emerge and hatch into adults.

Clingers don't molt into swimmers, and swimmers don't molt into clingers.

I would love to see Blue Wings come on, on the Clinch and have personally never seen an adult or a nymph anywhere on the river. That doesn't mean they aren't there, just that I have not personally seen one.

There used to be all sorts of weird hatches decades ago, but they seem to have waned over time. Naturally I don't fish much until summer, so they may still be happening for all I know.

To clarify; I meant on the bottom and not actively hatching.

Baetis nymphs are normally outstanding swimmers, but they are reported to lose this ability when they emerge. They get to the surface by dead-drifting, buoyed by gas bubbles, or by crawling to the surface on some object and letting go to drift along in the film (rather than crawling out). They have trouble breaking through the surface film, escaping their shucks, and drying their wings to take flight.

Of course, I could be wrong. I guess I need to try and up my 100+ days of fishing the Clinch more often to increase the statistical significance of my sample sets.