PDA

View Full Version : Best two man backpacking tent?


flyguys
09-15-2012, 01:50 PM
Now that I have bought the backpack(Osprey Aether 65) Just need the thoughts on the best for the money two man backpacking tent. Preferably a three season tent. All the info on the packs came in very handy. Looking forward to the responses on the tent. Thanks flyguys

MadisonBoats
09-16-2012, 08:17 AM
In Jest: Is there any such thing?:biggrin: J/K; wish they would call it the best man and female tent.:smile:

g022271
09-16-2012, 11:14 AM
Check out the Eureka website for the Zeus 2 backpacking tent. I've had the Zeus 3 (no longer made) and it is one great tent.

RFork
09-16-2012, 05:59 PM
What type of features do you want? Do you want a traditional tent or something lighter? Tarp? Shaped tarp? Tarptent? There are a lot of good options out there.

Breck
09-16-2012, 07:57 PM
Purchased the Hubba Hubba 2 years ago . Absolutely a breeze to set up by yourself. Lightweight, will fit in your pack. Love most the 3 ways to set up depending on the weather.

1) Full set up: Footprint, tent , then rain fly.

2) Foot print and rain fly only.

3) Just the rain fly.

Good luck!!

Breck

NDuncan
09-16-2012, 11:24 PM
Purchased the Hubba Hubba 2 years ago . Absolutely a breeze to set up by yourself. Lightweight, will fit in your pack. Love most the 3 ways to set up depending on the weather.

1) Full set up: Footprint, tent , then rain fly.

2) Foot print and rain fly only.

3) Just the rain fly.

Good luck!!

Breck


Thats sounds like a great tent, but I wouldn't recommend posting on the hook-up thread asking if anyone wants to go stay In Your hubba hubba out in the woods...:biggrin:

David Knapp
09-16-2012, 11:58 PM
I'm partial to Big Agnes tents. Check out the Seedhouse SL tents for something that is very light and packs down small as well... The BA Fly Creek UL tents are even lighter. There are downsides to going light though. For example, the tents only have one door. Two man tents with a door on both sides can be nice...it really just comes down to what you want out of the tent.

RFork
09-17-2012, 12:06 AM
I'd take a look at tarptent's offerings. Good light tents. I am partial to tarps myself, but they are not for everyone.

Grannyknot
09-17-2012, 08:43 AM
Man there are so many options out there, it really just depends on what features you like. Economical, durable, & weight are the 3 big ones to consider. Rarely will you find a perfect blend of all 3.

I've got a couple of Big Agnes tents that I am pretty partial to (Seedhouse SL1 & Emerald Mountain SL3), but I also own a 12 year old Kelty tent that has never let me down.

3-4 years ago MSR was having a lot of trouble with the floors on their Hubba tents, but I'm sure they've got that fixed now. I wouldn't hesitate to buy a new one if your heart is set on one, but I would definetely steer clear of any MSR tent marked as clearance or used.

If I were buying a new tent today, I would probably look at the thickness of the floor material (compared to others) & the thickness of the rainfly, & if its sil-nylon, I'd try to get some Hydrostatic Head test results. This will give you an idea of the amount of rain it would take to create a "misting" effect inside the tent.

RFork
09-17-2012, 11:59 PM
Man there are so many options out there, it really just depends on what features you like. Economical, durable, & weight are the 3 big ones to consider. Rarely will you find a perfect blend of all 3.

I've got a couple of Big Agnes tents that I am pretty partial to (Seedhouse SL1 & Emerald Mountain SL3), but I also own a 12 year old Kelty tent that has never let me down.

3-4 years ago MSR was having a lot of trouble with the floors on their Hubba tents, but I'm sure they've got that fixed now. I wouldn't hesitate to buy a new one if your heart is set on one, but I would definetely steer clear of any MSR tent marked as clearance or used.

If I were buying a new tent today, I would probably look at the thickness of the floor material (compared to others) & the thickness of the rainfly, & if its sil-nylon, I'd try to get some Hydrostatic Head test results. This will give you an idea of the amount of rain it would take to create a "misting" effect inside the tent.

Fabric thickness has little to no bearing on waterproofness. HH ratings are a good place to look.

Grannyknot
09-18-2012, 08:39 AM
Fabric thickness has little to no bearing on waterproofness. HH ratings are a good place to look.

I mentioned fabric thickness mostly in reference to durability.
But your statement as it pertains to water resistance isn't true.
70D nylon holds a lot more WP coating than 30D nylon.
Look at HH test results between the 2.

RFork
09-18-2012, 12:29 PM
I mentioned fabric thickness mostly in reference to durability.
But your statement as it pertains to water resistance isn't true.
70D nylon holds a lot more WP coating than 30D nylon.
Look at HH test results between the 2.

It depends on the coating thickness. If you put the same PU coating that is on most 70 denier nylons on a 30 d in the same thickness, the waterproofness will be the same. You are comparing a silicone coating to a PU coating and are negating different thicknesses of coating.

EDIT: examples

http://www.rockywoods.com/Fabrics-Kits/Ripstop-Nylon-Fabrics/Coated-Ripstop-Nylon-Fabric

70 d at 2.5 after coating. 1.9 before

http://www.rockywoods.com/Fabrics-Kits/Ripstop-Nylon-Fabrics/1-3oz-Silicone-Coated-Ripstop-Nylon-Fabric

30d at 1.3 after coating. 1.1 before.

Grannyknot
09-18-2012, 01:38 PM
I can't really say that I understand your point as it pertains to the links you provided.
It seems like you are comparing fabric weights, along with a perceived application of coatings, while I am talking merely about independent test results.
Regardless, this thread is about to derail in a bad way.

Flyguys...My point to you was that there really is no "best 2p tent" out there. Every tent offers different selling points. The ultra-light tents can sometimes be a double edged sword. Sometimes a durable floor is worth more than the weight savings you'll get from a lighter tent.

duckypaddler
09-19-2012, 10:58 AM
I love my Big Agnes Fly Creek 2. Although I use it as a solo tent. While it is very light weight, I don't believe durability will be much of an issue with just a tiny bit of care. If I was getting one as a 2 person I would get the Fly Creek 3. If you want an extra door and another vestibule then get a Copper Spur. Look for sales or even used as they are quite pricy. I was able to get my Copper Spur 4 (family backpacking) through Steep and Cheap at less than 1/2 price shipped. My fly creek I used my 20% off coupon from out school coupons at local outfitter. Used ones can be found on fourms at white blaze, and backpacking light. Also backcountry is having a sale right now that anything they have on sale you can get for 50% MSRP so that might be an o-ption for some tents also. Plus don't forget GoLite. They now sell all their gear through their website and their stores. While you can no longer find it at REI, you can now pay what REI did for the gear. My buddy just got a 3 person tent from them, and they run some awesome deals week to week. And yes those tarp tents are pretty sweet too. While I'm not brave enough to be a tarp guy, those tarp tents are worth the look. And all the BA tents allow you to set up just fly and floor for even more weight savings when bugs, or extreme weather are not to be expected:smile:

Hope that helps

Mundele
10-05-2012, 12:54 PM
This is an older thread, but I thought I'd chime in. I am a hammock hanger 90% of the time, but when I can't hang I use an REI Quarterdome T2 tent that I really like. It's got a full mesh body (similar to the Hubba series) and a lot of nice features. You can occasionally find them on sale at REI. Great tents. They also make a "T3" if you want a bit more room.

--Matt

Crockett
10-05-2012, 08:21 PM
This is an older thread, but I thought I'd chime in. I am a hammock hanger 90% of the time, but when I can't hang I use an REI Quarterdome T2 tent that I really like. It's got a full mesh body (similar to the Hubba series) and a lot of nice features. You can occasionally find them on sale at REI. Great tents. They also make a "T3" if you want a bit more room.

--Matt

I like hanging too but still want a Henry Shires Moment which is less than 2lb:
http://www.tarptent.com/moment.html

I know Spotlight has one but haven't got to see it yet.

RFork
10-07-2012, 02:06 PM
I like hanging too but still want a Henry Shires Moment which is less than 2lb:
http://www.tarptent.com/moment.html

I know Spotlight has one but haven't got to see it yet.

I had a TT Moment, and it really is a beautiful tent. Extremely fast setup and a good amount of room. Ample vestibule space as well. The only problem that I had, and this is mostly a result of having a very small pack and a particular packing order, is that that the tent has non-removable struts at the head and foot end. I didn't like having to pack that to one side of the pack while having heavier stuff offset to the other side. Aside from that, it is a fantastic tent. The speed of setup is awesome.

Realtyman
10-07-2012, 09:56 PM
I started out with a Kelty Grand Mesa 2 which will run you about a $100 if you shop around. It is tight quarters but the weight and price aren't too bad.

Moving on up, the REI Half Dome is a lot more tent for the additional cost <$200. I would go for the Half Dome Plus which is better suited for those of us over 6' tall. I wish I had of started with this tent and it has very good resale value.

Currently, I am toting a Sierra Designs Zolo 3 which is very heavy! This is for shorter hikes with both children hiking along. As long as you go with a good name brand tent, I don't think you will have any problems. Just pay attention to the weight.

bluefish
10-11-2012, 07:49 PM
Another vote for the BA Fly Creek 2. Has done some long trips in the Sierras and Vermont, seen snow, hail, massive thunderstorms and winds approaching 50. Not a problem. Has condensation issues from 40 down- you need to really pull the fly out and the door is better left partially open. Enough room for my wife and I, as stated earlier for two friends I'd opt for the 3 person. After about a month of set up use it still looks and functions as new.

Charlie

David Knapp
10-11-2012, 10:30 PM
Another vote for the BA Fly Creek 2. Has done some long trips in the Sierras and Vermont, seen snow, hail, massive thunderstorms and winds approaching 50. Not a problem. Has condensation issues from 40 down- you need to really pull the fly out and the door is better left partially open. Enough room for my wife and I, as stated earlier for two friends I'd opt for the 3 person. After about a month of set up use it still looks and functions as new.

Charlie

It's good to see you around again and good to hear some first hand knowledge of that tent. I have had my eye on it for a long time now! By the way, how about some fishing reports? Miss reading about your great trips for steelhead,etc., over on the CFF board...

bluefish
10-12-2012, 08:32 AM
Thank you, David. I stopped in here to see some of your adventures and photography, along with Troutman's. I haven't been south in awhile, probably due to missing my friend, Olyn. I spent the first part of Sept. on a lengthy trip in the Golden Trout Wilderness and last year did another long walk in the Sierras that really put the tent to the test. If you forgo the stuff sacks and keep guylines to a minimum, you can carry just over 2 lb. , The extra weight is not a problem for me , and I add in a few extra Ti stakes, a footprint, some para-cord for strengthening guys. and a 6 sq, ft piece of plastic for the entrance/vestibule.I still end under 3 lbs. . Last year we hit some major mountain weather above 12,000 and thanks to some creative pitching, the tent held up very well and kept us dry and warm in some very nasty conditions. For shoulder season trips, it is a warm tent, the fly material seems very reflective. Temps in the 20's were bolstered up into the 30's. Just need to be wary about the condensation issues. All in all, I'm happy with it and have no plans to upgrade or change. I've been chasing GL salmon and landed the biggest one ever for me-a 49"er! Ill put some pics up after the steel season really kicks in.
I added this site into my favorites and will continue to read it. It's a great place from a great area. I miss the Little and the LP.

Charlie

Troutman
10-12-2012, 09:50 AM
Bluefish, Its good to see you on here again! I also miss seeing everyone from the CFF forum. I haven't been on here much lately either.... too much arguing and such going on in some of the threads. A lot of my old friends have left the forum for the same reasons.
I'm interested in this thread also cause I'm hoping to do some motorcycle camping/ fishing trips in the spring and a lightweight tent would be nice.
Say Hi to Nancy for me!

bluefish
10-12-2012, 12:40 PM
Gary, it would be a good choice of tent as it can be separated out into small pieces about the size of a large grapefruit and a small package of poles. Very easy to stuff. I did tons of bike/fish trips, I use to ride the Dragon and fish the Little. It's how I started coming down to Elkmont. If I can help in any way with some advice on gear , let me know. Great to see your posts and I hope we can chase some smallies together, someday. Nancy says hello, back. If you run into Tom, give him a huge hey Brother! from me.

Charlie