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Kris
04-30-2014, 06:19 PM
I am tying a bunch of Elk hair's for May and I can't decide on whether to use white or natural color for the wings. Any thoughts?

silvercreek
04-30-2014, 08:28 PM
Tie some of each just in case.

Thunderhead8
05-04-2014, 10:05 PM
For what it is worth, I tied a handful of each this weekend along with as many yellow neversinks in size 16.

Stonefly
05-05-2014, 09:21 AM
Curious how did the popular caddis pattern come to be called the Neversink here? Elsewhere in the country its called a Puterbaugh Caddis, created by Don Puterbaugh, a guide on the Arkansas River. The name Neversink referred to another pattern with foam wrapped around the hook shank. :confused:

steve

Thunderhead8
05-05-2014, 12:21 PM
Curious how did the popular caddis pattern come to be called the Neversink here? Elsewhere in the country its called a Puterbaugh Caddis, created by Don Puterbaugh, a guide on the Arkansas River. The name Neversink referred to another pattern with foam wrapped around the hook shank. :confused:

steve

We do things here our own way, and the committee met and decided it was a good idea and it was put to a vote at 1:30 AM after several rounds of drinks and the vote passed by a margin of 2-0 with one voter abstaining. Actually, he couldn't even pronounce his own name by then. Next order of business was an intervention on the poor chap.

Actually, I really think nobody in the southern Appalachians can pronounce "Puterbaugh".

Grannyknot
05-05-2014, 01:02 PM
I always thought it was named after the neversink river.

Thunderhead8
05-05-2014, 01:19 PM
I always thought it was named after the neversink river.

According to Byron, that is not the case. It is named for it's ability to float through rough water without the need to grease it up all of the time.

It is a big producer in the Smokies. I always wondered about the chicken and egg conundrum with this fly. Does it produce more because more people use it? Or, do more people use it because it is a better producer??? I think it is the latter just from personal experience. I still like to use the conventional caddis flies too.

Kris
05-05-2014, 09:24 PM
According to Byron, that is not the case. It is named for it's ability to float through rough water without the need to grease it up all of the time.

It is a big producer in the Smokies. I always wondered about the chicken and egg conundrum with this fly. Does it produce more because more people use it? Or, do more people use it because it is a better producer??? I think it is the latter just from personal experience. I still like to use the conventional caddis flies too.
My experience with the neversink is that it does mostly what the name implies. It does great in the riffles, Though I have on occasion had one sink just below the water surface and become a wet fly.

MadisonBoats
05-06-2014, 06:03 AM
We do things here our own way, and the committee met and decided it was a good idea and it was put to a vote at 1:30 AM after several rounds of drinks and the vote passed by a margin of 2-0 with one voter abstaining. Actually, he couldn't even pronounce his own name by then. Next order of business was an intervention on the poor chap.

Actually, I really think nobody in the southern Appalachians can pronounce "Puterbaugh".

I about spit my coffee up reading this...:smile: I always thought the name was just one of those self explanatory things. Interesting information!

Grannyknot
05-06-2014, 08:30 AM
According to Byron, that is not the case. It is named for it's ability to float through rough water without the need to grease it up all of the time.

It is a big producer in the Smokies. I always wondered about the chicken and egg conundrum with this fly. Does it produce more because more people use it? Or, do more people use it because it is a better producer??? I think it is the latter just from personal experience. I still like to use the conventional caddis flies too.

This is from James & Angie Marsh's site....

The original Neversink Caddis was a fly designed years
ago for imitating caddisflies on the Neversink River in New York. This was before anyone knew one caddisfly species from the next. At that time caddisflies were just described as brown ones, green ones, etc. Some fly shops and anglers are still that uneducated when it comes to caddisflies.

D-Drake
05-06-2014, 09:49 AM
Stonefly is correct...it really is just an otherwise named Puterbaugh's Foam Stone.
We call it the Neversink Caddis because that is the pattern name on the order list. The fly comes from a company in the Northeast so I'm not sure if they called it the Neversink because of the river or because of the flotation.

duckypaddler
05-06-2014, 06:58 PM
Does it produce more because more people use it? Or, do more people use it because it is a better producer??? I think it is the latter just from personal experience. I still like to use the conventional caddis flies too.

2 words - Yellow Sallies:biggrin:

I wish we as fly fisherman could train the trout by using the same flies