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David Knapp
04-20-2006, 06:55 PM
I am looking for suggestions on good wading boots and caring for wading boots. *I've been using the Patagonia boots for a couple of years now. *The first pair wore out within about 1 year and they replaced them for me. *Now the second pair is falling apart even worse than the first pair less than a year after I got them. *I guess I'm just too hard on my boots. *First question, how long should I expect a good pair of boots to last me? *To put this in perspective, I fish probably 60-70 days a year and a lot of these days includes hiking at least some in my wading boots. *Should I try to refrain from hiking while wearing my boots? *

Secondly, has anyone ever used a shoe repair shop to fix wading boots? *I'm thinking about trying to get mine restitched and new felt soles put on. *Is this worth the money or should I just get a new pair.
*
Finally, any recommendations on wading boots would be appreciated as I might end up needing to buy a new pair. I'm a college student so price is a factor...

Thanks for any help and advice!

David Knapp

Justatroutbum
04-21-2006, 12:17 PM
I have a cheap pair of "Bone-dry"wading boots that have worn very well for about three years and will probably continue to for a few more.
The wife and son have Orvis and one pair started to drop some of thee stitching after one use.
I dont think price or lables make much difference, it all seems to be a matter of luck when it comes to wear or comfort.

My local shoe repair shop has proven to be very handy and inexpensive .
But Cobblers are a dying breed so if you have one locally give him a visit as he most likely can do what you want .
:)

David Knapp
04-21-2006, 03:29 PM
Thanks for the reply! I found a great shoe repair shop that was able to stitch the seams back together for me and sold me some good cement that should work for the felt that is coming off, at least for awhile. At $7.50, that is way better than new shoes!!!

David Knapp

stretch
04-22-2006, 01:55 AM
PA, you might want to check out the Chota STL boots when you are ready to purchase some new boots. Comfortable, light, and the lacing system(no knots to come lose). Some might argue about the laces, but I have had mine for a year and a half, with no issues, and I get on the stream about as often as you (stated), maybe even more ;).

tennswede
04-22-2006, 07:49 AM
Weinbrenner's Gary Borger designed made in U.S.A. they run about $130 dollars a
pair but well worth it. They are comfortable for hiking and they will last two to three seasons which is probably average with your kind of time on the water. I am also hard on my boots and I do resole them after two seasons with a diy resoling kit that you can buy. I skimp on other gear sometimes but not on boots since that is the most important aspect of my equipment.

keepflyfishin
04-22-2006, 07:49 PM
I have a pair of simms guide boots that I have worn for 3 years and have never had a problem. I've used and abused them pretty hard both in Tennessee/N.C. and out west while guiding in the summers. *I have owned various boots by other companies including orvis, cabelas, and hodgeman. Simms has outlasted them all. *Also, I would advise making sure that the next set of boots you get are double stiched on the outside of the felt sole so they won't *separate from the sole of the boot as easily.

David Knapp
04-23-2006, 12:52 PM
Thanks for all of the great advice. I'll check into these other boots when mine start falling apart again/worse. I'm definately going to get some that have the felt stitched onto the boot in addition to being cemented on. I think that would help a lot of the issues I've had. Thanks again!

David Knapp

Gary
04-23-2006, 04:26 PM
Weinbrenner's Gary Borger designed made in U.S.A. they run about $130 dollars a *
pair but well worth it. They are comfortable for hiking and they will last two to three seasons which is probably average with your kind of time on the water. I am also hard on my boots and I do resole them after two seasons with a diy resoling kit that you can buy. I skimp on other gear sometimes but not on boots since that is the most important aspect of my equipment.

I've been looking for a dealer that sells these for a couple years now. Anybody know who sells them?
gary

Gary
04-23-2006, 04:37 PM
I am looking for suggestions on good wading boots and caring for wading boots. *I've been using the Patagonia boots for a couple of years now. *The first pair wore out within about 1 year and they replaced them for me. *Now the second pair is falling apart even worse than the first pair less than a year after I got them. *I guess I'm just too hard on my boots. *First question, how long should I expect a good pair of boots to last me? *To put this in perspective, I fish probably 60-70 days a year and a lot of these days includes hiking at least some in my wading boots. *Should I try to refrain from hiking while wearing my boots? *

Secondly, has anyone ever used a shoe repair shop to fix wading boots? *I'm thinking about trying to get mine restitched and new felt soles put on. *Is this worth the money or should I just get a new pair.
*
Finally, any recommendations on wading boots would be appreciated as I might end up needing to buy a new pair. I'm a college student so price is a factor...

Thanks for any help and advice!

David Knapp

I've gone thru several over the last five or six years, and here's my thought on them:
I had a pair of Simms boots that were very nice, but they were cut too small. If I were to but them again I'd but them a Half size larger.
The Hodgmen boots are junk, but I actually like the velcro straps. You can tighten them up after you've had them on awhile.
I've been wearing a pair of Danners for a year now, and they are not bad boots. A little heavy, and seem to take too long to break in. I'd also like them to be a little "fuller" in the way they cut the toe.
I have bad ankles, and these offer some of the best support I've seen. Mine are not cleated, but just plain felt soled. I've yet to see a problem with them.
I tried on the Chotas, and they just didn't fit my feet right at the top. Could have offered a little more support on the ankles. But still are a very good boot. About on par with Simms in quality. I like to wear heavy wading socks, and when you add the wader and these socks things can get alittle tight in the toe region.
gary

sustratiotes
04-23-2006, 08:02 PM
I have a pair of the LL Bean wading boots built on their hiking boot frame with the AquaStealth rubber soles. They provide excellent support, grab snot rocks about as well as felt, and don't pick up snow or mud like felt.

They worked so well, I ordered the kit to add the AquaStealth soles to my old pair of Weinbrenner's Gary Borger boots to keep as a spare. I took them to a local shoe repair shop and he replaced the felt with the AquaStealth rubber and stitched it on along with the glue. I told him I might be sending him some more business from other fly fishers and he said don't bother - it was the last pair he would ever do. The rubber is some kind of sticky composite that kept clogging up his grinding wheel when he was grinding the edges to fit. (it comes as a rectangle piece of material that can be cut to fit) He said it stunk up the shop so bad he had to open the doors and windows even though it was freezing outside. He wasn't sure what the material was, but he was sure he wasn't going to do that again... If you decide to resole with the kit, better find a willing shoe repair shop or be prepared to tackle it yourself.

-halieus

tennswede
04-24-2006, 09:47 AM
Weinbrenners are not widely distributed. I know of one dealer in the Knoxville are but I won't give it out due to respect to the board sponsor. I have asked Byron about this and he is looking in to it. They can be ordered on their website also if you can't find them at a store. Do a google. Hopefully Byron is going to carry them. They are simply the best and made in the good old U.S.A.

Byron Begley
04-24-2006, 11:05 AM
Hey Guys, I called Weinbrenner a month or so ago and asked for a dealer package.
I never got it. *I called again today and was assured I would get one by Friday.
They are a huge shoe company and fly fishing is a tiny part of what they do.
Also, they don't have a sales rep in our area. *All I know is from my past conversations
with them that they are nice people. *That's all I know. *I'll keep trying. *

Byron

pmike
04-24-2006, 07:32 PM
I realize that I am a bit late on this thread, but wanted to mention Korkers Outfitters. They have convertible soles so if the soles wear out all you have to do is buy a new set and change them out. They also are very comfortable and well made IMHO. I bought them for the ability to change from a wading type sole to a hiking type sole. I figured it would be great for being able to hike into some of those blue liners without wearing out or messing up the felt.

One last point about Korkers is that they tend to run a size smaller than most boots or shoes. In other words if you wear a size nine street shoe, you'd need a sixe ten in the Korkers. I suggest that you purchase them in a shop where you will be able to try them on. I am not sure of LRO sells them???

Mike

David Knapp
04-24-2006, 11:07 PM
Thanks again for all the replies! I have a question about the Korkers pmike. How long does it take for the soles to wear out on those convertibles? Are replacement soles relatively cheap (as compared to new boots)? I saw these boots when I was doing some online research and they looked really great for all the reasons you mentioned.

David Knapp

pmike
04-25-2006, 12:35 PM
Howdy PA,

Mine are relatively new, only used them for one trip so far and they really don't show any wear yet. The soles appear to be very durable and cost is $20.00 or $30.00 dollars.

One factor on the plus side concerning wear is that the felt wil last much longer if you use the rubber hiking soles for hiking in to streams. In other words rather than hiking several mile on felt, you can use their hiking soles ans swap them out for felt at streamside. No I also realize some folks will wear a different pair of shoes or boots for hiking then switch to their wading boots at streamside, but thm you have an extra pair of shoes or boots to hide or carry around.

Yet another thought is that you can use the felt soles with lugs for extremely slick areas and exchange the studded felt for plain felt for driftboat fishing so the lugs won't mess up the boat.
Mike

Waterborn
04-25-2006, 04:42 PM
Have to second the Korkers - I just got a pair last month and they are a working out nicely...very comfortable and great ankle support. I've been using Chota's STL for the last few years and while they are amazingly comfortable, the ankle support could stand some reinforcement, but the real issue is that I had them tore up the first six months I had them. Daniel helped me out with a replacement pair - but the new pair didn't last much longer after that so I decided to wear them into the ground to when I couldn't stand it any more (gotta get my moneys worth) and finally broke down and grabbed the Korkers. The selling point for me these is that the soles are easy to replace. The metal D-ring loops for the laces adds durablility, and with getting the different sole options - I have different shoes with out the cost.
We'll see how long these lasts!

jim635
05-09-2006, 02:11 PM
I have had korkers for three years now. I haven't worn out the sole yet. I did have a pair of felt ones fall apart on the White River, but I called the factory and they sent me a new pair free. I love mine. You can't ask for better boots. I bought these for $60 at a fly fishing festival. The new ones are $79 and $139 now. I don't think you will go wrong with them.

Jim

Gary
06-16-2006, 01:39 PM
Hey Guys, I called Weinbrenner a month or so ago and asked for a dealer package.
I never got it. *I called again today and was assured I would get one by Friday.
They are a huge shoe company and fly fishing is a tiny part of what they do.
Also, they don't have a sales rep in our area. *All I know is from my past conversations
with them that they are nice people. *That's all I know. *I'll keep trying. *

Byron

well Bryon, I'm waitting to see if your gonna sell them. If you do I'll be wanting a pair of size nines next time I'm down your way! I can get them in Montana, but at least want to be able to try them on just to see if the size is right. In the meantime I'm still wearing that pair of Danners (finally got them broken in), and they are about as comfortable as any I've worn (but heavy). I might add that the taller boot really helps my ankles.
gary

MTN_TRT
06-20-2006, 08:59 PM
I have to say I am a little disturbed that only ONE of yall recommended Simms... :'(. But thats alright - different boots for different people. I like Simms... the only problem ive had outta my simms boots is that i broke a lace last year. PA, you mentioned that you're in college and price is a factor but the freestone are about as good a price that ive found on a boot of that quality. hey- thats just my 2cents. these guys know companies i have never even heard of...trust them :)

MTN_TRT

"LIFE IS GOOD"

kytroutman
06-21-2006, 08:25 AM
MTN_TRT

I too wear only Simms boots. The reason I prefer them is their weight but also the higher shank on the ankles. Anybody who has had to scale the rocks to get down to the right fishing pool can understand that. You are correct, for the money, the Simms are great boots but you should also think ahead and buy a couple of exta pairs of laces.