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easttnsalmon
01-17-2007, 07:03 PM
How big a problem are the tubers during the summer months. I know there is a lot of miles of the Little River. Where do they congregate mostly? Where would be a good place to go on the Little River to fish during these times? I know around the little motels they tend to splash around.

Griff
01-17-2007, 07:05 PM
You have to go up higher during the tube hatch. It works out anyway because that's where you will find the cooler water.

DryFly1
01-17-2007, 07:41 PM
easttnsalmon,

I've never found the tubers to be much of a problem as griff described. *The problem I have found is families with kids(non-fishing families). *I have literally had families come within 10 feet of me and start throwing rocks and playing in the water! *I generally just wish the little tykes well and move on.

Also(and some of you may have experienced this) if you fish abrams, always be prepared to have rocks chucked on you from above . Every time I fish there kids and adults throw rocks,I quess they don't realize we are there. *

This is why I now seek out more remote locations.

As a side note: Always be prepared for the Paparazzi- I try to look my best and hope I tie into a big one!

I was fishing little river above elkmont this past November when a group of about 13 people stopped to watch me and take photos while I was stalking a hole of water. *I was fishing a dry(yellow stim) and placed it exactly where I wanted it. Fish on! *13inch brown!!. *They all started clapping? *My moment of glory in a smoky mountain stream...

DryFly1

Gerry Romer
01-17-2007, 11:22 PM
The vinyl hatch seems to be confined pretty much to the lower elevations - say, below 2,500 feet. But you'll be amazed by the various hatches in the higher elevations. Of course, you'll find the plastic hatch (two-liter variety being the most obvious) at all elevations. But in the upper elevations you'll run into the aluminum hatch (in the form of abandoned lawn furniture and such) and various forms of the cotton hatch (in the form of abandoned beach towels, usually on the side of the stream, and ball caps and t-shirts, usually in the stream). The cotton hatch seems to be greater in the upper elevations. I suspect it has to do primarily with the stream gradient. Vinyl doesn't thrive in plunge pools. The shed cotton husks would seem to indicate that the gradient in the upper elevations lends itself to some of the more death-defying humans. Once you've seen them in action (generally screwing up the fishing 100 yards above and 100 yards below their location) you'll understand the aluminum hatch. They seem to be to exhausted by the end of the day to haul all that aluminum back up the trail to their truck.

;)

Gerry Romer

ijsouth
01-18-2007, 12:27 AM
Once you've seen them in action (generally screwing up the fishing 100 yards above and 100 yards below their location) you'll understand the aluminum hatch. They seem to be to exhausted by the end of the day to haul all that aluminum back up the trail to their truck.

LOL! Around here, we have an aluminum hatch too - here, they don't want to weigh down their ski boat or jet ski, or whatever other craft they use to chase their perverted activities. I've often thought a few strategically-placed mines would be very effective, and entertaining ('jes kiddin). ;)

geerona
01-18-2007, 10:57 AM
On the subject of an aluminum hatch, my son in law and I made our first trip to Michigan's AuSable river last fall, actually the south branch since it holds brook trout as well as browns and is much easier water than the main body for a first timer there. When we arrived at the first bridge/parking area we noticed 20-30 canoes but no other vehicles. Thought that was rather odd since none were secured in any way. Just as we got our waders on and rods lined up the cars piled in like the morning after Christmas sale at Wal-Mart.

We hustled down stream and managed maybe 30 minutes before the hatch began. A group of Boy Scouts and dads out for a final outing. Most were friendly and courteous but some were in for a long day from the way they managed to get into every tree limb along the bank.

The fishing was over since they were floating the water we intended to fish for several miles and upstream was all private property.

I guess you'll have that, gary <*))))><

Green Weenie
01-18-2007, 11:47 AM
The Tube Hatch

Time Of Year: June through September, but the legendary hatches are in late June and early July.

Preferred Waters: Slow, fishy-looking stretches of rivers and quiet, flat pockets of water.
This species occurs throughout the East and Midwest and even in isolated pockets in the West. It's found in rivers of all sizes and temperatures, including the mighty Mississippi whose vast mud flats put this hatch--literally--on the radar. Stillwaters from tiny spring ponds to Lake Erie can also have good hatches.

The tube hatch begins in early June in the southerly trout waters. It moves to the northern part of the Upper Midwest through the next several weeks, peaking in the last half of June and first half of July in most of the famous rivers. It lingers into August in the coldest headwaters of this region, as well as in the Northeast, where it is more restricted to stillwaters.

Because of easy access and the slack substrate requirements of tubers, most rivers (even outside the heart of their range) support good populations. Others have only a few places, a pool here and a run there, with good tube activity. *If you wish to look for this hatch away from well-known tubing rivers, you cannot just pick from the map at random. Instead, check with fly shops and follow every whispered rumor. No other hatch creates so much mania on so little water.

Hatching Behavior
Time Of Day: Usually dusk, dawn, midday, sometimes late at night, anytime there is fishing activity.

Habitat: Attaches itself to fisherman, living off their peace of mind.
The tube emergence begins at dawn and is most intense then, but it often continues to provide unfishable action for hours, even past midnight.

There is disagreement between authors about the manner of emergence. Some say these tubers take a long time to struggle free from their shucks.
Shuck: The shed exoskeleton left over when an tuber molts into its next stage or instar. (Most often it describes the last nymphal or pupal skin exited during emergence into a bare-footed, beer-drinking adult.) Others say the process is very fast. So the choice to fish a Natural Light emerger pattern is your gamble, but most people fish this hatch by imitating the Twinkie duns. Everyone agrees that the duns ride the surface for quite a while before falling off and make a lot of commotion. My observations are mixed: I have seen the trunk-wearing nymphs twitching for a while below the surface without breaking through, making commotion that looks like the swirls of feeding killer whales, but once the Twinkie duns start to show they're up and out quickly.

Although the dialy timing of this hatch is predictable, the days when it will occur are not. One day may be so intense the fish can't find your fly among the tubers, and the next day can seem identical but be completely devoid of them. Hot, humid days are best, especially when it's very cloudy. There are old-timers who can feel it in the air when it is coming, but nobody has figured out how to put this sixth sense to words.

Sometimes on cloudy days these Twinkie duns emerge in the afternoon and the fishing can be horrible. Everybody pities the unlucky angler who stumbles onto the rare "Only Day I've Had Off In a Year Daytime Tuber Hatch."

easttnsalmon
01-18-2007, 02:47 PM
Great piece of wisdom...Now I have a different perception about the "tuber epidemic" that occurs every summer.

Waterborn
01-18-2007, 05:31 PM
I wouldn't avoid the tuber hatch, there are some hawgs to be caught...last year below the sinks I almost landed a monster 30" + brown skinned, rainbow bathing suit wearing toddler named Brooke, on a tadem- rigged 5/0 RC Cola and Moon Pie streamer set up....had to throw 'er back cause she hung me up on a rock ::)...

Chuckwalla
01-18-2007, 06:10 PM
easttnsalmon,

I've never found the tubers to be much of a problem as griff described. The problem I have found is families with kids(non-fishing families). I have literally had families come within 10 feet of me and start throwing rocks


I was fishing below the Y one day and was hit not once but twice by a young rock skipper. ::) ::) I just laughed, but didn't hang around for a third.

Vern
01-18-2007, 09:10 PM
Fished up above Elkmont last year and I am sure I am in several differant vacation photo albums. Now why would someone want a picture of a 220# man wet wadding putting greenweenies in the trees to act as decoys for inch worms (Griff's suggestion). I am no Brad Pitt by any means. ;D But didn't see any vinyl hatch that far up. But did pick up some mono fillament hatches on my way out.

stretch
01-19-2007, 02:59 AM
I wouldn't avoid the tuber hatch, there are some hawgs to be caught...last year below the sinks I almost landed a monster 30" + brown skinned, rainbow bathing suit wearing toddler named Brooke, on a tadem- rigged 5/0 RC Cola and Moon Pie streamer set up....had to throw 'er back cause she hung me up on a rock *::)...

Jermz that's a good set up.... *Another favorite is the bud light popper with a BeadHead slawdog softhackle dropper. I won't even give out my secret fly for the bikini hatch ;)

ruggerfly
01-19-2007, 10:08 AM
Stretch,

Your secret fly for the bikini hatch wouldn't happen to be a little green$$$ at the end of your line? ;D

Fishermansfly
01-19-2007, 10:14 AM
Well Stretch based on what I've seen you can keep you bikini fly. Most don't make it to the good stretches of water mainly because they are to overwieght and watching the 6 offspring from ealier reds. That would be like fishing in Oak Ridge for two headed fish. ;D If I had to guess on a pattern I'd say it's not so much on the pattern but presentation! You know how you step out of your 1980 full size 4 wheel drive pick um up truck with a rifle rack hanging from the rear window. I'd say you have to get out with a rebel hat on, a white t-shirt or better your chances with a dirty wife beater. As you exit your monster truck, at least carry the attitute that it's the baddest thing on four wheels, You must reach in to the bed of your truck to get a 12 pack of beer or bring the same cooler you used to store your catfish in last night loaded with a pack of dogs and box of moon pies, but loaded mostly with the cheapest nastiest beer you can find...9 out of 10 would be Natural Light or Paps Blue Ribbon..If you bring Hieny's you'll be looked at as a sissy boy! Corona's will work depending on the species this is a high end beer and will produce a less than desirable catch. Make sure as you decend to the waters edge you load your mouth with the most rediculous hunk of the nastiest bit of chewing tobacco and speak in the ancient native tounge. Sounds alot like ebonics mixed with alot of profanity. If there are kids around yell at them like your dog....This produces an effect on the bikini breed something to the effect of the water being turned on (generating) on a tail water....Sparks thier interest and gets them feeding...Once at the waters edge remove your shirt to expose the distinquished tan lines and remember sun tan lotion is for sissy's, make sure to put your hat back on displaying that rebel flag. Now here is the key to presentation. Get drunk, don't get in the water, yell obnoxious profanities and pick a fight (can be with a woman) but a man will produce better results. Usually if you pick a fight with a woman then your day has in most cased produced quite a few good catches because the woman you will probably be fighting with is your wife, well in most cases EX-WIFE.

Ohhhh, I'm sure we could all talk about this matter in greater detail but I think everyone has covered the basics. On a more serious note It's not so much the tubers it's the amount of traffic through townsend in general...Vacationers and out of towners are the biggest problem...Making it to just about every section of water in the park to take pictures, skip rocks, through bolders, stomp around, yell, and otherwise play at or in the water. Most people will stand over top of you taking your picture and gauking at how strange it is to see some1 whirling a line above their head. I myself have to admit it is pretty neet to see an angler at work but you will find that with everything in life their is someone out there that doesn't know how to, in this case, spectate a sport.

Some of the good runs will vanish in a vast array of people. So yes, higher elevations will work but if you want peacefull fishing I would look at a hike in trail..Keep in mind that Abrams will be quite busy due to the falls not to mention the regular cades cove traffic!

Waterborn
01-19-2007, 11:54 AM
Stretch,
You'll have to show me that tie at the next get together ;)

Yeah, the lower runs are indeed overrun in the warmer months, and I stick to higher elevations...but if I get the itch, I usually fish the lower reaches early or late in the day....abrams can surprisingly afford you "on stream privacy" in that while the traffic is nasty getting there and the trail crowded, it also keeps people off the water because getting there is the pain and so not as many anglers out and about...so if you brave the traffic (or just get out there early enough to avoid it) you kinda can be hidden in plain sight...

littlerivermike
01-19-2007, 12:09 PM
Just when you think you've seem it all...... *Earlier this month on the middle prong of the Little....fishing upstream, heard a noise, rounded the bend....saw a radio controlled 2' long power boat doing figure 8s in the hole I was planning on fishing.....just moved on. *:'(