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View Full Version : BWOs on the Hiwassee


David Knapp
04-14-2007, 10:53 PM
The last 2 afternoons have produced epic BWO hatches on the Hiwassee. Hungry trout plus a blizzard of bugs has produced some exceptional fishing. I was lucky enough to fish this hatch 2 afternoons in a row. Yesterday was better as far as numbers and size of fish caught but today had the larger hatch. The bugs were so thick that the main reason you didn't get hits was that there were just too many options.

Updated: Just posted a short video clip of the rising fish to my blog (http://thetroutzone.blogspot.com/)...I took the video with my digital camera this afternoon...

Yesterday, I did well catching 2 decent browns in addition to lots of rainbows. The browns wanted a softhackle I was fishing as a dropper.

The bugs...

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204539997O672968484.jpg

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204539940O555520068.jpg

Which were being consumed by these...

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204540095O250133770.jpg

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204540098O320343492.jpg

The sun broke through late this afternoon, lighting up the far bank of the river...

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204540031O386778775.jpg

mstone
04-14-2007, 11:05 PM
I'm glad to hear that the mayflies are makin' a good appearance. Those are some cool pics.

mstone

ttas67
04-15-2007, 12:17 AM
that video is insane! the water looks like it's boiling. that camera takes a pretty decent video.

celticangler
04-15-2007, 08:54 AM
Outstanding! Nice brownie.

Taxon
04-16-2007, 12:40 AM
http://photo.ringo.com/204/204539997O672968484.jpg

Plateau Angler-

This one appears to be a male Hendrickson dun (Ephemerella subvaria).

David Knapp
04-16-2007, 08:26 AM
Taxon, welcome to the board! It is interesting you mentioned that...it very well could be... I have spent quite a bit of time the last couple of days trying to figure out what exactly these bugs were and have discussed it with some other people. I actually used the link you have at the bottom of your post and entered in the characteristics and it returned the mayfly of the family Ephemerellidae and specifically the Attenella attenuata. I originally thought they were all BWO's and just assumed this guy was just a little darker than the others. Any further thoughts would be appreciated as this bug identification thing is confusing at times...:rolleyes:

MTN_TRT
04-16-2007, 08:39 AM
That reminds me of something that happened Saturday....
I was fishin a pool that ALWAYS has trout rising in the tail of it. I was fishing an "adams" emerger and catching some trout. Well these two..uh yankees came down to the water. I politely got out the water and took off my glasses. They looked at the air, "What kind of bugs are those?"
The other guy mumbled something in Latin. I said "Grey ones, kinda dark grey....Id say an adams or BWO. Size 16, probably could get away w/ a 14 though." They gave me this god-awful look and left. HAHA!

Rockyraccoon
04-16-2007, 09:57 AM
I wouldn't call that fly a hendrickson.

Looks like a paraleps to me.

Frequent visitors on the Hiwassee and most of your darker bwo patterns will work fine when the fish are busting the paraleps.

Taxon
04-16-2007, 10:39 AM
Taxon, welcome to the board! It is interesting you mentioned that...it very well could be... I have spent quite a bit of time the last couple of days trying to figure out what exactly these bugs were and have discussed it with some other people. I actually used the link you have at the bottom of your post and entered in the characteristics and it returned the mayfly of the family Ephemerellidae and specifically the Attenella attenuata. I originally thought they were all BWO's and just assumed this guy was just a little darker than the others. Any further thoughts would be appreciated as this bug identification thing is confusing at times...:rolleyes:
Plateau Angler-

Thanks for the welcome. What characteristics did you enter?

flyman
04-16-2007, 11:06 AM
Why aren't you fishing today Rocky, little too windy? Although the fly looks alot like Paraleptophlebia, I don't think it is. They have very small oval hind wings (only one of the three tail duns if I'm not mistaken that do) and this specimen appears to me to have prominent hind wings with the shallow depression and small projection commonly found in Ephemerella. What do you think Taxon? They are all so close in appearce, and the truth is PA they all could have been hatching that day.

Taxon
04-16-2007, 11:06 AM
Looks like a paraleps to me.

RR-

Perhaps, but Paraleptophlebia hind wings are characterized by lack of costal angulation, unlike this specimen, which seems to have rather sharply defined costal angulation.

ttas67
04-16-2007, 01:08 PM
taxon, what is that avatar picture you are using? I've been staring at it and can't make out what it is.

David Knapp
04-16-2007, 01:29 PM
They are all so close in appearce, and the truth is PA they all could have been hatching that day.

I know :rolleyes: there were at least two types of bugs because I caught one that had only two tails...sorta assumed it was probably baetis...??

Taxon, here is the information I entered:

3 tails
#16 (may have been a bit larger and depending on how much, this does change the results)
Uniform color fore wings
Obvious hind wings
left the "other characteristics" blank
flowing water
during daylight
SE US


While ya'll are helping me with my bugs, here's photos of all that I saw (at least all I got pics of)... The VAST majority of bugs were like the last one pictured here for those that want to know what is/was hatching...

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204959118O158768328.jpg

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204959110O960430768.jpg

http://photo.ringo.com/204/204959070O265900548.jpg

Taxon
04-16-2007, 03:21 PM
taxon, what is that avatar picture you are using? I've been staring at it and can't make out what it is.
Trevor-

Good question. It's the larval head of a Limnephillid (Northern Casemaker Caddisfly), genus Limnephilus as I recall.

Taxon
04-16-2007, 03:36 PM
Why aren't you fishing today Rocky, little too windy? Although the fly looks alot like Paraleptophlebia, I don't think it is. They have very small oval hind wings (only one of the three tail duns if I'm not mistaken that do) and this specimen appears to me to have prominent hind wings with the shallow depression and small projection commonly found in Ephemerella. What do you think Taxon? They are all so close in appearce, and the truth is PA they all could have been hatching that day.
flyman-

Yes, I agree. Perhaps you missed my post #5 (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showpost.php?p=36856&postcount=5) above.

Taxon
04-16-2007, 04:04 PM
3 tails
#16 (may have been a bit larger and depending on how much, this does change the results)
Uniform color fore wings
Obvious hind wings
left the "other characteristics" blank
flowing water
during daylight
SE US


Plateau Angler-

The problem with Attenella attenuata would be that there aren't any in TN. See N. American Mayfly Distribution (http://flyfishingentomology.com/NA%20Mayfly%20Distribution%20Query.asp) on my site, and enter TN is the box for State.

Also, you might want to a look at the leading picture in this article (http://www.flyfishingentomology.com/Article%20The%20Hendrickson%20Hatch.htm) I wrote for Hatches Magazine two years ago. I think you'll find a striking resemblence to your specimen. Another thing that made me lean toward Ephemerella subvaria is that it's the earliest emerging of the Ephemerella species you have in TN.

flyman
04-16-2007, 05:15 PM
Taxon I did miss your post, thanks for the confirmation of the info. Attenella attenuata (McDunnough 1925) have been documented in Great Smoky MT Nationa Park.

http://www.discoverlife.org/nh/cl/GSMNP/aquatic_insects_GSMNP.html

I think a few more detailed studies of aquatic insects has been done in the park than the rest of the region. I have noticed in the past several species left off of the USGS site present in places not indicated on their map.

http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/distr/insects/mfly/index.htm

BTW-I would like to complement you on your site. Well done, lots of great info in a format that the average person can comprehend.

Taxon
04-16-2007, 06:00 PM
Attenella attenuata (McDunnough 1925) have been documented in Great Smoky MT Nationa Park.

flyman-

Thanks for sharing that information, and also for your kind words concerning my website. With regard to Attenella attenuata, I suspect they were in the N. Carolina part of the SMNP, as opposed to the Tennessee part, however. In any event, whatever source one uses for mayfly distribution, it will always be incomplete to one degree or another.