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lauxier
06-21-2007, 12:25 AM
does a stream,that flows,and manages to become waters rich in Calcium Carbonate grow better,larger,and healthier trout??Can stream water be manipulated into a higher PH so as to contend with acid rain thereby giving trout a better backyard to live in...

eastprong
06-21-2007, 06:09 AM
I think the answer is "yes". I seem to recall that there is a crushed limestone contraption on one of the branches of the Potomac (North?) in West Virginia (?) that continuously delivers a finely powdered limestone to combat acid mine drainage. It's expensive.

--Rich

Gerry Romer
06-21-2007, 09:39 AM
I believe it's being done today right here in the Cherokee Forest on one of the tributaries of the North River. So far it's working quite well.

Gerry

Jack M.
06-21-2007, 10:11 AM
Supplementing a stream with water that raises the pH and buffering capacity is a fairly common technique to remediate streams with high acid problems. Here's a story of one TU chapter in PA that uses a diversion well technique:

http://www.dftu.org/div.well.htm

18inchbrown
06-21-2007, 10:33 AM
I think that adjusting the pH of a stream by limestone addition is a logical thing to do. The Doc Fritchey chapter of TU has successfully done this on Stony Creek in Central Pa. to offset acidic coal mine drainage.(http://www.dftu.org/projects.htm). Being a chemical engineer and coming from a manufacturing background (30 years), I think it would be a relatively easy project to adjust pH of a stream. You could do so automatically, with little supervision. You would have to be able to measure the flow of the stream continuously and then add the limestone mixture proportionally based on the flow. You would of course have to have a downstream ( after limestone is mixed) pH monitoring point so as to offset any problems with the addition of the limestone. Heck, I could sketch up a PID in about 4 hours. The problem I see is having power to the site so you can run the equipment and the control devices. You could have the ability to have the data logged and sent to a remote monitoring point say the wildlife officers 24/7 operating base. Another problem is siting the equipment so as to have access for maintenance. You would also have to consider security for the vandals.

I believe that limestone (or suitable base) addition is just an engineering problem that can be solved. The cost well that would be , I'm going to guesstimate perhaps in the $25,000 to $50,000 range for the equipment and the labor well that could be a TU project thing. This of course depends on the availability of power. The perfect stream to try this at would be the stream up above Chimney Tops? What's the the one that is acidic? ( Alum creek)

Well, you would also have to deal with the govenment autoriites and perhaps radical environmentalists, who may view pH modifcation as the man-made solution as opposed to the stop the acid natural way.

18inchbrown
06-21-2007, 10:36 AM
Hey Jack, I see you posted the Doc Fritchey link as I was typing up my reply. I did'nt mean to double up anything. I just type slow and have to edit a lot because of the one finger pecking technique.

softhackle
06-21-2007, 08:31 PM
does a stream,that flows,and manages to become waters rich in Calcium Carbonate grow better,larger,and healthier trout??Can stream water be manipulated into a higher PH so as to contend with acid rain thereby giving trout a better backyard to live in...
Calcium carbonate will raise the pH of a stream. A slightly basic ph (above 7) will allow more organisms total and more diverse aquatic organisms to grow in the stream allowing for more and larger trout. All you need to do is to compare the spring creek section of Abrams to the other creeks inside the park and you will see my point.
As for the second part of your question the answer is yes.