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irfishing
01-18-2008, 09:11 PM
Below is a post from the Middle Tennessee Fly Fishers message board.
Because of the importance of the topic, hope they don't object to spreading the word.


Fellow Anglers,

As you may know, an algae called "Didymo" (Didymosphenia geminata) has invaded several East Tennessee waters. This colonial algae forms brown mats with white streamers that can look like toilet paper. Didymo is bad news. At times it can densely cover miles of river, making it difficult to fish. It could also smother habitat needed by the aquatic bugs that trout need to eat. So far, TWRA has not observed any changes in fish populations that can be attributed to the algae, but we are still concerned.


At this time, nothing can be done to remove Didymo from these rivers. Didymo can spread to new waters on fishing gear, especially felt wading boots. Didymo is difficult to kill and can live for weeks on damp boots. You can prevent its spread to other waters by thoroughly cleaning your gear before entering new waters. Anglers should clean any gear that is in contact with the river bottom (boots, boats, trailers, nets, etc.). Take the following two steps to clean your gear:


1) Wipe off any debris from your wading boots and other gear as you leave the river - leave it there.

2) Before entering a new water, kill the Didymo on your gear- you cannot see it, but it is there. Kill methods:

a. Allow wading gear to completely dry, then let it dry for an additional 48 hours, OR

b. Soak wading gear for one minute in a 2% bleach solution (1 cup household bleach and 3 gallons of water).



Didymo is present on the South Holston, Cherokee, Wilbur/Watauga, and Norris Tailwaters. It is also common in Arkansas tailwaters. It has not been observed in the Hiwassee, Duck, Elk, Caney Fork or Cumberland (KY) rivers. To stop the spread of Didymo and any other invasive species, always use the above protocol before entering new water bodies, regardless of where you are fishing.



There are some photos at the TWRA Region 4 website - http://www.homestead.com/twra4streams/didymo.html



Spread the word - not Didymo,



Frank Fiss





***********************************************
Frank C. Fiss
TWRA - Fisheries Management Division
P.O. Box 40747
Nashville, TN 37204
615 - 781 - 6519 phone
615 - 781 - 6667 fax
Frank.Fiss@state.tn.us
***********************************************

Creekchub
01-19-2008, 12:10 AM
Unfortunately, I am told that didymo has been spotted in the Cumberland River down river from Wolf Creek Dam also. Hopefully, someone will come up with a way to deal with this stuff.

Rockyraccoon
01-19-2008, 12:45 AM
I have seen it in the Cumby as well. :(

mcfly
01-19-2008, 12:49 AM
I know that, personally, I will cry the day I see this stuff in the Hiwassee. It would be a shame to unreasonably spread this stuff around. I have heard that it may not be possible to completely kill didymo in felt soles because of the nature of the material. Is this true?

Also, I notice that LRO has started carrying these wading boots called "Korkers". One of the soles that you can purchase is a rubberlike model called "aquastealth". It appears that this sole would give you the benefits of felt while being easier to rid of didymo. Is there truth to that? If so, have others found the soles to be a good product or is it just a gimmic?

I know of many who have stopped wearing felt altogether out of fear of spreading this stuff, but this can be somewhat dangerous on some of the mountain streams I've fished in the area and I would like an alternative.

swipper 74
01-19-2008, 12:59 AM
I know that, personally, I will cry the day I see this stuff in the Hiwassee. It would be a shame to unreasonably spread this stuff around. I have heard that it may not be possible to completely kill didymo in felt soles because of the nature of the material. Is this true?

Also, I notice that LRO has started carrying these wading boots called "Korkers". One of the soles that you can purchase is a rubberlike model called "aquastealth". It appears that this sole would give you the benefits of felt while being easier to rid of didymo. Is there truth to that? If so, have others found the soles to be a good product or is it just a gimmic?

I know of many who have stopped wearing felt altogether out of fear of spreading this stuff, but this can be somewhat dangerous on some of the mountain streams I've fished in the area and I would like an alternative.

Aquastealth has started to appear on a few boots recently. Reports/reviews I have read around the internet give these types of soles high marks. Although I have never used these soles, I just ordered a pair for my Korkers Guide Boots. When I've had the chance to use them, I'll give a report on their performance. As for cleaning them, they have to clean easier than felt!

I have just recently started reading about Didymo and am curious, where did it come from and how did it get in the rivers??

flydoc
01-19-2008, 10:17 AM
I've had Aquastealth wading boots from LL Bean for years. I absolutely love them and couldn't imagine going back to felt. I find they provide superior traction in the water and are also much more wear-resistant on hikes into the backcountry. I don't know the science in terms of resistance to Didymo, but it kind of makes sense that they dry quicker and would be easier to clean.

Paula Begley
01-20-2008, 12:40 AM
Several customers have emailed us regarding the treatment of boots for didymo, and the treatments vary from every government organization you contact.

This interesting tidbit: I had a customer from Connecticut who I was speaking with this week. She and her husband are going to New Zealand. The gov't of New Zealand will allow in NEW boots, but any boots that have been USED they will seize. The process they use to decontaminate them is FREEZING THEM FOR 24 HOURS.

Interesting.

Paula

Grumpy
01-20-2008, 08:52 AM
I think your waders need to be cleaned, dried or frozen as well, not just the sole of your boots, the whole boot.
Could i be wrong?

What about boats, they should be cleaned as well i would think.

Grumpy

ChemEAngler
01-20-2008, 01:28 PM
Something I read once about Didymo is that it can only survive in very cold waters. The temperature I recall the report noting was around 53 degrees. But just because I read it in somebody's report on the internet doesn't make it true. However if this is the case, then that explains why it thrives on the Clinch, SoHo, and Watauga, and why it hasn't yet showed up in the Smokies and on the Hiwassee where they easily exceed 53 degrees each summer. Nonetheless, I always soak my waders and boots in a bleach solution and thoroughly dry afterward before going to a different river.

I have a pair of Orvis Clearwater waders that are on their last legs and am seriously considering a new pair of Korkers with a set of aquastealth and studded felt soles.

Travis

Gerry Romer
01-20-2008, 10:19 PM
As I have posted before, I always clean my Korkers felt soles after each trip to a contaminated stream by pressure washing them at the local car wash. Since the soles are removable, I hang them on the wall of the wash bay where you're supposed to wash your floor mats, and lay the boots on the floor against the wall. I then hit them with the pressure washer on the rinse setting to remove the obvious buildup of river crud. I switch to the soap setting if I've been in a known didymo stream and hit them again. Switch back to the rinse setting and and hit 'em again close up - about 3 or 4 inches away. I then let them thoroughly dry out before entering another stream.

Nothing scientific or anything... but when they dry out, those soles are lily white again! It also seems to lift the nap of the felt again.

Just my two cents... again.

Gerry