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-   -   Efficient Fly Fishing(Tailwaters) (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11935)

Wilson10 02-24-2009 02:33 PM

Efficient Fly Fishing(Tailwaters)
 
With Spring right around the corner I've began to ponder ways to help myself become a more efficient fly fisherman. Below are a couple things I want to do better. Please feel free to offer advice and also to share some things you want to do better. Or if you would like, you can simply offer advice for efficient tailwater fishing.

1. Become a better dry fly fisherman
2. Learn to locate better fish more consistently


These are just a couple off the top of my head. I'll be sure to add more later.

Thanks,

ChemEAngler 02-24-2009 03:29 PM

Just my two cents for fishing the tailwaters around here is to become very proficient using midges. Whether it be dries, larva, or pupae. Learning how to properly fish the correct midge imitation can mean the difference between a skunking and a fantastic day.

I spent last year working on the midge techniques, and it paid off. This year I am planning on working on my dry technique just like you. I think the first thing to concentrate on is mending and getting a perfect drift. IMO that is what makes the difference when fishing dries.

flyred06 02-24-2009 03:47 PM

fishing nymphs without indicators and mending. Also, slowing down. I tend to get myself worked up to quickly thinking more is better versus planning my next cast and letting my drift go all the way through without interupting it.

psnapp 02-24-2009 09:11 PM

I, too, would add that fishing midges (including black fly patterns) in appropriate sizes and patterns with a drag-free drift is a key to successful tailwater fishing. Midges and crustaceans are tailwater staples, and the more proficient you become in presenting a "reasonable" pattern in a "reasonable" size, the more success you will have.

I would like to suggest another ingredient to the tailwater strategy mix -- streamers. Having a variety of sculpin, shad and general-purpose (eg buggers, zonkers, Barr and Gallup concoctions, etc) patterns in your arsenal and focusing on the lesser-fished areas can mean the difference in a so-so day and a super day. I (not to boast) have had some very good days on E Tenn tailwaters fishing streamers in not-so-popular areas when the overall fishing around me was lackluster.

Phil

ajh10567 02-25-2009 12:29 AM

I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?

Wilson10 02-25-2009 12:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ajh10567 (Post 63666)
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?


Not exactly what you were talking about but I was just reading about a 3 fly system of which have 3 different life cycles. Anyone used this before? Seemed interesting, but guaranteed to tangle on me. I have hard enough time with a 2 fly system.

ajh10567 02-25-2009 01:41 AM

Yeah sorry it was a little confusing, but i basically meant that. Just fishing the larvae and the pupae stages together.

ajh10567 02-25-2009 01:45 AM

again
 
Sorry, to clarify I was just wondering how effective that method of fishing could be? My goal for this year is to really understand how to effectively fish midges so thats why I am asking this question.

92Esquire 02-25-2009 06:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ajh10567 (Post 63666)
I have a question about midge fishing. I was thinking about tying up some midges for this weekend and I was wondering how effective a thread midge (to imitate the larvae) with wire wrapping that flows right below the surface with a beadhead zebra midge dropped about 18 inches below (to imitate the pupae). Would this be an effective way to midge fish for just a dumb idea?

Not quite the same, but I've spent some time fishing a weighted Zebra midge below a soft hackle before. Similar idea. I still picked up all of my fish on the Zebra, for what it is worth.

ChemEAngler 02-25-2009 12:20 PM

A common rig I use on the Clinch is to fish a #20 brassie with a #20 or 22 zebra midge about 12 inches below the brassie. A brassie does a very good job imitating midge pupae and the zebra imitates the larva. This rig has been very effective when casting to rising trout.

If I am casting to rising trout I will set my indicator so that the brassie is about 12" below the surface. If I am blind casting, I set my indicator so that my zebra midge is bouncing on the bottom.


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