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-   -   Switch rods (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14940)

finandfeather 03-10-2011 05:54 PM

Switch rods
 
Ok long time lurker first time poster.

Last year I started fishing light weight switch rods on tail waters and have enjoyed using this method for double nymphs and large streamers. I started using a 420 gram Skandi compact floating system or a weight forward 5 floating line with the rod.

What I'm wondering is no one else using this out here on the clinch or other tail waters in and around the area? The rod is a ECHO 10' 6" 4wht, it casts a wht forward five awesome overhand and spey casts really nicely as well.

Just was looking for others who are doing this....thanks

gutshot 03-10-2011 06:16 PM

What does it do better than a single hand or a Spey rod? I prefer a single for low water and a Spey rod for high water. I spent a week switching back and forth from some Spey to some switch rods and really developed disdain for the switch rods. The concept is nice but the application is not in my experience. Too heavy for a single hand application and too light for the spey.

I found that the switch couldn't give me the ompff I needed to get a larger streamer out on high water and I didn't enjoy it as much. I used a 6 wt spey the most for swinging larger streamers and also used it on one or two generators when i didn't have a boat to drift large nymphs under an indicator. I like the longer line and rod as I could actually fish a long drift in the faster water and catch fish with it. Something I couldn't do with a single hand rod in high water. There is a real advantage when stuck up against the bank on high water using the spey style casting that has almost no back cast. Hooked some very large fish with the nymph doing this.

I like to use a 10 foot single hand and the rods closer to 13 for two handed. I agree with you comment below that the longer rod is great for improved mending.

That's what I did...and my experiences.

If you have tried a rod longer than 10 feet, do you notice problems landing fish?

I found it was largely an negative experience to fish with tippet lighter than 8 lbs as I would break off too many fish with lighter tippet while trying to land them as I would have issues handling the line and the fish.

finandfeather 03-10-2011 06:37 PM

Thanks? I guess
 
If you have fished a Spey you know that you can cast without a back cast 100-120 ft and with a 10 1/2 foot rod you can mend a lot of line. I also use a one handed rod to was just asking. Thanks for the warm reception.....

BlueRaiderFan 03-10-2011 11:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by finandfeather (Post 91121)
If you have fished a Spey you know that you can cast without a back cast 100-120 ft and with a 10 1/2 foot rod you can mend a lot of line. I also use a one handed rod to was just asking. Thanks for the warm reception.....


Ah well...welcome to the board either way. I am looking into buying a switch rod myself. I know little about them but have seen videos by Kinney. I too think the switch is better suited for my needs but I have a 4wt and a 6wt and want to get my two hander in an 8wt. I may have to get the smallest spey rod instead.

finandfeather 03-11-2011 08:40 AM

No look into......
 
The TFO deer creek 6wt and bump up two line sizes for a traditional 8wt weight forward floating, I have used that combo a lot on the New River for smallies swinging and stripping crey patterns and minnows. You can cast at least 100 foot with a nice easy motion and no false casts.:eek:

Heavynets 03-11-2011 10:24 AM

I built my switch rod from a Batson 7 wt. 10'-8" 4 piece blank. I love that rod and use it about 50% of the time. If I could only own one rod, it would be a 7 wt switch rod.

I have never fished the park, but I frequently fish tailwaters and medium to large rivers. The right line, leader and fly/streamer combination is critical for a good fishing experience. With the right combination you can turn over a streamer the size a small squirrel or mend a nymph 40 feet out.

I use an #8 WF floating line or a skagit with a sinking tip. I'm still experimenting with the skagit line weights to find the right combination.

BlueRaiderFan 03-11-2011 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by finandfeather (Post 91140)
The TFO deer creek 6wt and bump up two line sizes for a traditional 8wt weight forward floating, I have used that combo a lot on the New River for smallies swinging and stripping crey patterns and minnows. You can cast at least 100 foot with a nice easy motion and no false casts.:eek:


Ah! Good to know...I can't wait to try using one.

BlueRaiderFan 03-11-2011 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Heavynets (Post 91146)
I built my switch rod from a Batson 7 wt. 10'-8" 4 piece blank. I love that rod and use it about 50% of the time. If I could only own one rod, it would be a 7 wt switch rod.

I have never fished the park, but I frequently fish tailwaters and medium to large rivers. The right line, leader and fly/streamer combination is critical for a good fishing experience. With the right combination you can turn over a streamer the size a small squirrel or mend a nymph 40 feet out.

I use an #8 WF floating line or a skagit with a sinking tip. I'm still experimenting with the skagit line weights to find the right combination.

Lot's to know and learn with these two handers and the spey nation can be very secretive. As far as the mountains, I wouldn't go with anything heavier than a 6wt and then only if I were looking for the largest fish in the park.

Fgsnyder 04-29-2013 08:39 PM

Hey gang, fished with a switch rod while steel heading swinging flies on the Lake Erie Tribs. I'm thinking I would like to use one on some of the wider tail waters for swinging streams, large nymphs, etc. Been considering a 5 wt Echo switch. Any one have any experience or suggestions? Thanks!

Joe Congleton 04-30-2013 07:26 AM

Everybody likes to play around with rods and reels and lines. Keeps Bryon and Paula in business. As to fishing efficiency it is hard to beat a single handerIMO on local tailwaters or mountain streams if you are doing anything that requires delicate presentations. I use loomis glx 10/ 5 wt about all over the country.

For several years I have fished two handed rods in the types of waters that require them. BC or other big brawling steelhead waters as well as for sea run browns in the huuricane type winds of TierraDel Fuego. The two handers generally are designed for those type situations where you cover water with basically the same length of line. Some think switch rods bring out the worst for delicate fishing ( too heavy, too much lines slap, not fun to play smaller fish etc). Others say switch rods are not big enough to deliver larger flies at distance consistently in extre conditions that require such presentations.

Unless money is no object i suggest anyone wanting to go the switch route try to find some place to actually test a switch rod on the type of water where you plan on fishing the switch,. as buying the outfit first is not cheap. There are some web sites that are full of for sale used switch rods daily.

Fishing a two hander from a boat has been a real pain in the butt for me. If you are truly spey casting trying to anchor your D loop is difficult to say the least. If you are overhead casting i have not found it to be more effective than a single hander personally. Some local friends love the switch rod concept. I think they like the romance of it more than the efficiency factor. Smiling. Which is fine.


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