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-   -   Harvesting Brown Trout? (http://littleriveroutfitters.com/forum/showthread.php?t=15704)

MadisonBoats 11-14-2011 09:54 PM

Harvesting Brown Trout?
 
I was just curious on what the opinions of LRO Members would be in regards to harvesting brown trout.

It is well known that the South Holston is the only tail-water that brown trout can adequately reproduce without extending stocking of fingerlings.

However; all of the other TVA tail-waters need significant stocking of brown trout to retain their catch-ability in tail-waters. From my 200-350 fishing trips in the last five years on the Clinch; I have noted that brown trout consist of 5-10% of my catches on a fly reel.

In contrast; I have observed numerous catches of brown trout on live bait and bait imitations. Many of these catches consist of significant sized brown trout.

From my observations and experience; I think brown trout should be limited at one-fish per day regardless of size and non-take rule established from October-January 1.

I welcome others opinions and I would like to read the pros and cons from anyone that wants to reply. I am not trying to inspire a debate. I just want to elicit opinions on how we can make our trout fisheries more sustainable and beneficial to all that participate.

Regards,
SM

waterwolf 11-15-2011 09:15 AM

I am not for killing of any trout, unless they are the pellet head stocker rainbows with no fins.

The ironic thing for me is I have no issues killing deer, turkeys, grouse, doves, crappie, sauger, and walleye. I kill tons of stuff each year, but for some reason I have a soft spot for trout.

MadisonBoats 11-15-2011 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by waterwolf (Post 97204)
I am not for killing of any trout, unless they are the pellet head stocker rainbows with no fins.

The ironic thing for me is I have no issues killing deer, turkeys, grouse, doves, crappie, sauger, and walleye. I kill tons of stuff each year, but for some reason I have a soft spot for trout.

Maybe it is that you subconsciously appreciate their struggle to survive in most of our local stocked waters and that they cannot adequately reproduce to maintain the take/death rate in most TN tailwaters(?):cool:

WVfish72 11-15-2011 10:49 AM

killing Browns
 
I don't normally kill any trout. I also think that if someone wants to eat one every now then they should be able too, provided they have a fishing license and they follow the slot-limit regulations.

I also was wondering why the only place trout adequately reproduce is in the South Holston? I am also wondering why the TVA and TWRA don't establish minimum flow rates on the tailwaters. It seems to have worked on places like the Frying Pan, South Platte and the San Juan, just to name a few. My guess is that answer is money.

FlyAddict79 11-15-2011 06:21 PM

If you want trout for dinner theres a nice place in Bristol called the troutdale

psnapp 11-15-2011 06:27 PM

Haven't harvested one in many years, so I guess I'm in the live and let live category.

Phil

WVfish72 11-15-2011 08:04 PM

Everyone should be able to do as they please, this is America.

FlyAddict79 11-15-2011 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WVfish72 (Post 97233)
Everyone should be able to do as they please, this is America.

Oh yeah im sure that would work out well.

5xtippett 11-15-2011 11:02 PM

I generally keep the fish the biologists and mortality studies tell me won't survive; the ones that bleed, and the ones that are hooked in the gills. Everything else goes back unless the biologist over the stream tells me otherwise. I can't throw one back that I know will die unless it is illegal to keep him, any more than I can shoot a dove and not make an effort to find him. I majored in biology in college and the only time I get to use it is in my hobbies, hunting and fishing. As a result I get along with most biologists quite nicely. If I am going to fish a stream a lot, I am going to talk to the biologist over it and see what he wants me to do. Most of them are nice as they can be and they know what is in their streams and what is in there. Most people don't realize it, but approximately 5% of what we catch dies no matter how careful we are. I am a little funny, but I have a problem with throwing something back that I know has little chance of surviving.

I am new to this board, so I was a little hesitant responding to this, but what the heck. I am good friends with two trout biologists, one in SC and one in Virginia. I called them the first time I ever started fishing their streams seriously. That was years ago and now I can call them with any question I might have.
One of them explained to me that a body of water can only support so much poundage of fish. You have to decide whether you want a whole bunch of little fish, a small number of big fish or a happy medium. ----- I only fish the South Holston a couple of times a year and I have never talked to the biologist, but I know people who have. I would suggest somebody who fishes up there call him and ask him what he thinks. If you are fishing any river a bunch I would suggest talking to the biologist over it and see what he says about how he wants you to fish it. Most of the limits are set for a reason-- so the biologist can manage his stream for the overall health of the river. I don't mean to sound like I am preaching, but it never, ever hurts to talk to a biologist about his river. You can learn a lot and they appreciate it to.

AL trout bum 11-16-2011 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5xtippett (Post 97238)
I generally keep the fish the biologists and mortality studies tell me won't survive; the ones that bleed, and the ones that are hooked in the gills. Everything else goes back unless the biologist over the stream tells me otherwise. I can't throw one back that I know will die unless it is illegal to keep him, any more than I can shoot a dove and not make an effort to find him. I majored in biology in college and the only time I get to use it is in my hobbies, hunting and fishing. As a result I get along with most biologists quite nicely. If I am going to fish a stream a lot, I am going to talk to the biologist over it and see what he wants me to do. Most of them are nice as they can be and they know what is in their streams and what is in there. Most people don't realize it, but approximately 5% of what we catch dies no matter how careful we are. I am a little funny, but I have a problem with throwing something back that I know has little chance of surviving.

I am new to this board, so I was a little hesitant responding to this, but what the heck. I am good friends with two trout biologists, one in SC and one in Virginia. I called them the first time I ever started fishing their streams seriously. That was years ago and now I can call them with any question I might have.
One of them explained to me that a body of water can only support so much poundage of fish. You have to decide whether you want a whole bunch of little fish, a small number of big fish or a happy medium. ----- I only fish the South Holston a couple of times a year and I have never talked to the biologist, but I know people who have. I would suggest somebody who fishes up there call him and ask him what he thinks. If you are fishing any river a bunch I would suggest talking to the biologist over it and see what he says about how he wants you to fish it. Most of the limits are set for a reason-- so the biologist can manage his stream for the overall health of the river. I don't mean to sound like I am preaching, but it never, ever hurts to talk to a biologist about his river. You can learn a lot and they appreciate it to.


I'm with you. I majored in biology too (albeit molecular) and talking to someone who knows the intimate details of the river/stream is the best bet.


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