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Old 08-21-2012, 10:43 PM
waterwolf waterwolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Varmitcounty View Post

Just curious, how many of the people who have an issue with the quality of the river are active members of the Clinch TU chapter?
No offense meant to anyone who is a member of the Clinch Chapter, but seeing how I was one a handful of people who founded the chapter I will proudly say I disavowed them sometime ago.

They took radical views that were not in tune with normal conservation views and sided with the bait slinger crowd known as LUCRO who spear headed the movement to remove the quality zone. The straw which broke their back was when they again sided on the side of the bait slingers and protested the current slot limits.

They have stood in the way of progress on the river for a good while now, and the only thing TU about them is their name.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corbo View Post
MORE DRY FLIES!

I think the Clinch needs more POOP in it so the hatches will be better and recommend dumping copious amounts of cow turd into the river at various places so that the bugs have more food.

It would be great if some biological yoyo could explain why the soho has fabulous hatches and the Clinch does not. More dry fly action would spur the local economy.
Corbo, again this isn't Maine and we have a whole load of issues which differ from north of the Mason Dixon line.

The biggest limiting factor to our benthic diversity is water temps. The Clinch averages such cold temps year round that it significantly reduces the bugs which can thrive.

John Thurman has done and knows more about the benthic population then anyone, has narrowed the list down to about 3 variances of sulphurs, 1 caddis, and the little black stones. Other then the midges, scuds, and sowbugs there is nothing that appears to be able to survive the temps.

We don't need anymore poop in the river, and any float down the river will reveal more than enough cattle utilizing the river on a hot summer day.
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