View Single Post
  #1  
Old 02-12-2007, 12:45 PM
Troutman's Avatar
Troutman Troutman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Seymour, TN
Posts: 1,279
Smile Fly Fisherman's Health

This is a subject I don't think anyone has discussed before and I wasn't sure where to post it.
This has been a long cold winter and hopefully Spring's warmer temps will come early this year.
I definitely have the fever. CABIN FEVER that is! I haven't been able to go fishing very much this winter. I planned on going to the S.Holston and Watauga several times during Jan. and Feb. but things change, work, etc. To compensate for it, I have been tying flies and reorganizing the gear several times. I went up to LRO twice to watch the tying demos. (thanks LRO) I rig up the flyrods and practice casting on the lawn. My neighbors think I'm crazy, Even ask If their biting sometimes. They don't understand this addiction. I know some of you can probably relate though.
What are you doing to prepare for the upcoming Spring fishing ? What about the other problems that plague most of us over 35? I'm talking about flycasting related like sore hands from gripping the flyrod handle all day. I know several guides that have developed tendonitis in their forearms from repetitive rowing and casting. Remember how sore your shoulders and low back can be after casting all day while hunched over concentrating on the drifts.
A hot shower, and a good meal followed by an Ibuprofen definitely helps, but here are a few other things to do also.
1: Strengthen your grip; Exercise your hand muscles and fingers with a stress ball or therapy putty.
2: Stretch out your shoulder and back muscles before you head into the stream. Especially after driving for long periods.
3: Drink lots of water to prevent dehydrating and muscle cramping.
4: Forearm tendonitis can be relieved by wearing a tennis elbow brace that compresses the upper forearm tendons.
5: A wide wader belt or lower Lumbar support brace helps with a stressed back.
Lastly, RELAX, take time to sit down and watch the water. Listen to it. Not only does it usually lower your stress level, but may give you an idea whats hatching on the stream.
Anyone else have any suggestions? No OLD man jokes please!
Reply With Quote