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Old 05-04-2009, 12:27 PM
Tentwing Tentwing is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Livingston TN
Posts: 18
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Dave;

As you know most of the pre 1950's production rods were held together with hide glues ( horse glue) , and the finishes were not much better (quality wise) Now in the age of modern era glues and poly finishes our glues are better , and also a little stiffer same for the poly finish if you decide to go that route.

This extra bit of stiffness from regluing a delamination of even just putting that 2nd coat of polyurethane down on a finish and 3 coats on your silk can add nearly a half a line weight to tired cane.

Another trick I like to use is to add a line guide. As you know the silk wraps in every line guide will add a stiff point to your cane.I coat mine with 3 coats of Poly some guys like to use Epoxy, but Epoxy is to hard to remove, and dries so hard that I feel it causes a dead spot in the cane almost like a ferrule does.

A lot of your production rod makers tried to save money by using cheaper components and less numbers of line guides on their lower end rods so they could offer them at a cheaper price and still hold up their profit margins.

For instance As I'm sure you know all Grangers were basically the same taper they only differed in ferrule size and components when determining the difference in their highest end rod (The Registered) and their dimestore models (the Lake and Stream)

Heddon also did this with the exception of the actual cane used in their #35' and #50's. A #2 ferrule Heddon #50, 9 footer has 13 line guides counting the stripping guide and the tip top. The same # 2 ferrule 9 foot Heddon #8 has only 9 lines guides total.

About 2 years ago I redid a Jay Harvey Lincoln. It was in dire straits. The silk had dry rotted and the finish was tacky and soft, and could be pushed away with your finger nail. It was tired and soft enough to be activated by a 4 and was easily over powered by a DT5 ( even without flies on it ). After the refinish, rewrap, and going from 9 line guides to 13 this rod is a solid 5 weight and is just fine with a 6WF. It is now my keep it in the truck all the time rod
This allows me to fish the same feel and quality as my model #50 without the risk of falling and breaking a highly collectable piece of Bamboo history. Now that being said I would NEVER change the configuration on a higher end collectable ; Heck i would never trust my skills to any of my high end rods he he ,...but with a little TLC some of the lower end production rods can be made into some fine fishing tools.

Dave I hope some of this helps,.......Tentwing
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