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Thread: Dropper?

  1. #1
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    Smile Dropper?

    Alright fellas.I've been flyfishing a long time and am somewhat a dryfly purist.Love seeing the take!Nymphing has always been a sort of last resort.I've caught fish this way and am getting better with the technique.Now-over the last year or so reading all the posts on this very informative forum,,I've noticed all the refs to droppers.I can imagine the effectiveness but have coupla ?'s.How to rig and length of tippet between dry+nymph?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Swampus I am sure there are far more qualified folks on here to advise you on this issue, but here is my take on it. I generally go about two feet on my dropper. That is really not a constant. It really depends on the depth of the water. I have also had a lot of luck using an emerger behind a dry. This works very well on tailwaters.

    ~marc~

  3. #3
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    Jun 2007
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    Northern Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAMPUS View Post
    Alright fellas.I've been flyfishing a long time and am somewhat a dryfly purist.Love seeing the take!Nymphing has always been a sort of last resort.I've caught fish this way and am getting better with the technique.Now-over the last year or so reading all the posts on this very informative forum,,I've noticed all the refs to droppers.I can imagine the effectiveness but have coupla ?'s.How to rig and length of tippet between dry+nymph?
    Swampus,
    Lots of variations and possibilities. Typically, I tie a length of tippet to the curve of the hook. Usually long enough to get the nymph to the bottom on a dead drift below the dry fly. In most of the waters in the smokies, 18-24", sometimes less rarely more but sometimes more.

    I'm not a know guru so I just tie it on with a clinch knot. It's easy and I can tie that knot in my sleep. There are other knots that wok as well and I'm sure are stronger. Old habits die hard.

    If I'm fishing a wet fly that is an emerger riding in the surface film or just below, I may tie it shorter. On the tailwaters when fishing little #20 and smaller griffiths gnats and midges, I will sometimes tie on a larger dry fly and use it essentially as an idnicator because those tiny flies are really hard to keep an eye on but the larger fly can help one keep an eye on where the smaller one really is.

    I've found if I slow my casting stroke down a bit I get less tangles. with one dry and one dropper, I don't get tangled too bad. When tying multiple droppers, tangles are more problematic for me. Other guys fish multiple nymph rigs with no problems. Just depends on your casting stroke and skill. In the Smokeys, it's not a problem because one doesn't ever need to cast that far anyway. A 9' rod with about a foot or so of fly line out the end of the rod and a 9' leader is about all one needs for most of the streams.

    Again, lots of opinions and lots of options.

    Jeff

  4. #4
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    Thanks,Varmit.I can see about the depth.Guess I would have to adjust alot and these old eyes get enuff workout as it is.Thought of using a needle threader but haven't tried yet.The emerger idea is good.At the end of drift it would rise and "emerge".

  5. #5
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    Thanks Jeff.Can sympathise on the #20's.Gave them up several years ago.Eyes ya know?Want a laugh?How about a deerhair mouse with a # 8 nymph as a dropper in the Cherokee Trophy section?

  6. #6

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    Here's a really quick way to tie on that dropper knot, which I've always found to be a pain:

    Once your indicator/hopper fly is tied on (using whatever knot you want), just pull about 2-3 feet of dropper tippet off your spool and snip it clear. Take one end of the tippet and double it back over itself so it forms a loop about three inches around. Pinch the tip end to the main body of the tippet right there where the "loop" touches, between your thumb and forefinger. Press your fingers together and roll the tippet juncture forward. This will cause the line to snap into a quick twisty "hangman's noose."

    Then, simply pass the loop over the end of your indicator/hopper fly's hook, and carefully catch out the tip end from your spun loop. Pass the tip end through the loop (with the hook now inside), then wet and tighten: presto, a clinch knot you can almost tie with one hand. With practice, you can do this is ten seconds or less.

    One problem I've noticed: be sure the tip end of the tippet is being rolled (in other words, don't leave a long tag when you spin up your loop). If you leave a tag, the tag itself will be rolled onto the other side of the spun loop and it will all come undone when you release pressure. You have to catch that tag end out of your spun loop while still leaving the spin in place.

    Hope that's clear; if not I can probably run up a video at some point.

    Zach

  7. #7
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    Swampus, a couple of things.

    First: My experience has been right with Jeff. Thing to be aware of (and this probably goes without saying) is that the dry has to be of sufficient size not to be dragged down by the nymph. Stimulators are great for this. As Jeff suggested, I just use a clinch knot to attach the dropping tippet to the bend of the hook. Took me some time to keep from getting tangled with every cast. Guy from the Creel in Knoxville suggested opening up the back cast a little with a little loop to keep the flies from tangling up. I fished a lot last year with nymphs just because I was determined to learn how and had a lot of success. I've fallen back to dries pretty much this year but as the water gets cooler will probably revert to the nymphs again.

    Second: About a year ago, I started keeping midge threaders in my pack. There are days when I can't seem to get the tippet through the hook to save my life. I had spent way too much time struggling with it until PeteCz shared one of these threaders with me while we were out one day. Same concept as my Mother's old needle threaders. They've cut back tremendously on the time and frustration of not being able get the eyes working at times.
    Charlie B

    His eye is on the sparrow and I know He watches me.
    bartonca@hotmail.com

  8. #8
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    I'll try to explain this but if it's not clear, let me know and the next time I get up off my chair (which may be a while, especially if I take a nap, feeling kind of lazy today) I'll take a picture and post it. Let me know.

    I always had fits tying the tippet to the bend of the hook. The loop would always slip off as I was tightening the knot down or it would slip off the end of the hook as I was trying to get it tied. Really frustrating.

    I started using my hemostats in the following way.

    Picture the bend of the hook. Draw a straight line from the hook point to where the hook bend straightens out to the main shank. Now, clip the hook in your hemostats along that same line. It forms a closed loop that looks an awful lot like a hook eye. I then just run the line through the newly formed hook eye, tie it off, and presto, dropper hanging off the bend of the hook.

    Jeff

  9. #9
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    tHANKS ,GUYS.I knew I'd get the best info here.I'm going to try that unique twisty thing.The hemestat technique sounds functional also.We'll have to invent something to hold the hemes still,short of wearing a vise! Charlie-where can I get one of those threaders? Does LRO have them?

  10. #10
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    Apr 2007
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    Kodak, TN
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    An improved clinch knot tied from the bend of the upper hook works just fine and is easy (same knot I use to ty my fly to the leader). I recommend taking the tippet size and using the same size or smaller onto the dropper. Also, use fluorocarbon on the dropper as it has a better sink rate and is more resistent to underwater abrasions.

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