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Thread: eating trout

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    irvine ky
    Posts
    444

    Default eats

    I was raised on a farm in eastern ky.During the summer's, my parents grew a large garden.An average supper in those days was made up of kilt lettuce,green beans,cantalopue,beets,corn on the cobb fried taters and corn bread.This is regional cooking,mountain cooking, country cooking,or whatever you want to call it, it's as good as it gets.Have got a pack of trout layed out thawing,It'll be chef pauls' fried trout,fried taters,cole slaw,andhush puppies for supper tonight(I caught these trout out of little river the summer the water got so low)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    irvine ky
    Posts
    444

    Default once again

    in th 1950's,me,my sister,and my mom and dad would visit my uncle russell and aunt ann for a week or two in the summer,uncle rus was my dad's brother,i guess they were close,.uncle rus owned a farm,in the wear valley,he raised registered hereford cattle.he worked in knoxville,at UT(a chemistry teacher).these were our set aside vacatindays uncle rus and my dad would fish and squirrel hunt.aunt ann would take the freshly caught trout,lay them in a pan(heads off)(skin on) sqeeze fresh lemon juice on them,lots of lemon juice.she then put the lemoned trout in the refrigerator..she let em marinate for 24 hours,after a day or so(usually sooner)she'dpull them out of the fridg and sprinkle salt and pepper on the trout,she then smoked the trout in a 5 gallon metal can,under hickory coals,it was a smoker contraption from hades,but it worked....we had smoked rainbow trout that fell of the bone,and squirrel..,tender,in squirrel gravy,biscuits,,tomatoes for the gravy,gravy for the biscuits

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    223

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silvercreek View Post
    This kilt, wilt thing seems to be regional. My folks were from Kentucky and it was called wilt. My Mom always put a little chopped green onion in it. Whatever you call it, it sure tastes gooood. Silvercreek.

    My family called it "kilt" lettuce, same recipe. My wife's family calls it "Wilted" lettuce, same recipe but they add buttermilk. The vinegar curdles the buttermilk. I definitely prefer the "kilt" variety.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Lexington KY
    Posts
    127

    Default Wilt vs. Kilt

    From central Kentucky, edge of the mountains, Montgomery County, and it was always "wilted." Seems the further from the mountains, more likely "wilt" vs. "kilt." Mom from upstate NY, and she took to it like born to it. Skip Watson

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ashland KY
    Posts
    58

    Default

    Not trying to hijack but can we get some brown beans, cornbread and maybe a dutchoven pineapple upside cake.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rock Hill, SC
    Posts
    992

    Default

    ukfb1--How about a big pot of pinto beans, or better still, October beans, cooked with a hefty chunk of fatback (streaked meat, side meat) or a ham hock? As for the cornbread, as I've already suggested I believe (since I talk about foodstuffs at some length in my January e-newsletter--shameless promotion, you can sign up to get it free by visiting my website--it may have been that I have in mind rather than this forum) that there's nothing quite like cracklin' cornbread. I'm probably not the only one here who has been part of raising hogs, butchering hogs, and rendering the lard. The latter is what produces the cracklings, and they give a pone of cornbread a college education.
    Speaking of hogs, to my way of thinking you'll go a long way to find a dish that beats backbones-and-ribs cooked to the point where you can suck the marrow out of the rib bones. Also, maybe it's time for a quiz, since it is certainly too cold for anyone even to think about being astream.
    Hogs will eat most anything, from oak mast to mushrooms, cushaws to candy roasters, pumpkins to red-rooted pig weed. They even roamed "No Man's Land" between the trenches in World War I and ate the flesh of the poor souls who died in Flanders Fields and elsewhere. Same thing in some of the big battles of the Civil War. That might be enough to put you off pork for awhile, but here's the question. There is one thing a pig absolutely will not eat, and it is something we humans consume with regularity. What is it? If you know the answer I'll guarantee you are as country as cracklin' cornbread.
    With that, I better get busy doing something more productive but which will be far less fun.
    Jim Casada
    www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    irvine ky
    Posts
    444

    Default jim casada

    how about those frozen fish sticks that are made from "fish products",when you cook em they smell like a japenese whaling ship in july.Jim you are,i beleive,addressing what you percieve as a primordial flaw in us humans as oppposed to good judgement by the pig,which means a pig is in its own way kind of smart----therefore a pig's attributes would be 1)pudgy but cute 2)will eat most anything except the mystery food 3)is dirty,but could care less3)and relatively intelligent in a cooking channel sort of way--makes you wonder why pigs don't run for the US senate.

    Huey Long on cutting a country ham from a hog raised on his farm-"In the face that was the prettiest pig I ever saw..."

    I bought a cured country ham(a real salt cured ham,not a city ham)from a guy outside newport tenn, it weighed about 30 lbs,and was "old",had hung for 2 yearrs.It was the best ham I've ever tasted..he told me his cured hams came from hogs fattened on peanuts,he raised.I told him that was a good idea,being peanuts are high in protein etc.He said it was not an original idea..he borrowed it off Thomas Jefferson,who fattened his hogs on peanuts many many years ago.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Langley, Ky.
    Posts
    107

    Default Country as Cracklin' Cornbread

    Jim,
    One thing a pig will not eat is a cucumber. Is that what you had in mind?

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Davidson and Bryson City, NC
    Posts
    188

    Default Cracklings

    Somewhere around here I've got 50 year old pictures of a hog killin' - skint, hanging upside down by his hind quarters and a big black pot of boiling water over on the side - all shot with my Brownie box camera.

    Short of the nearly impossible task of finding a scene like that again, does anyone know where I could buy real cracklings? I've found several recipes online and lots of paces where I could order them. But I don't necessarily want to buy a pig in a poke (pun intended).




  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rock Hill, SC
    Posts
    992

    Default

    FLYFSN--You win the prize (which, since I promised nothing esle, is the heartiest of congratulations on a life obviously lived, at least in part, on a farm). For whatever reason, pigs won't touch cucumbers. My 100-year-old father won't either, and always says, "I'm not about to eat something I hog won't eat." Jim Casada

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