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Thread: If you could only....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, Tn
    Posts
    7

    Default If you could only....

    Hello all,

    I am planning a trip form myself and seven friends coming up from Florida to come up and backpack and fish at the end of April. I am buying the flies for everyone and for ease of purchase a large quantity against my normal train of thought I was going to bulk up on just a few fly types. SO

    If you could only carry 7 flies, I like odd numbers, into the mountains for all types of trout fishing which would they be. A mix of dry, nymph and maybe a streamer. I may be a dreamer but I am a dreamer on a budget and 25 each of seven fly types is about the max on my budget.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maryville
    Posts
    1,053

    Default

    I know you're looking for 7 different kinds of flies, but...I would have 4 different colors of elk hair caddis flies, and 3 parachute adams, all size 16. This is pretty much what I fish with 90% of the time.

    *edit* I do not fish nymphs in the park. This is a personal choice, and I do not look down upon those who do. Therefore, I have no recomendations that I can give you about which nymph or streamer patterns to get.
    Last edited by buzzmcmanus; 01-15-2010 at 02:55 PM. Reason: Gave off a negative vibe with my first post.
    My posts are worthless without pictures

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Waynesville NC
    Posts
    515

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    I don't know, having landed quite a few browns in the park over 18 and 20 inches on nymphs I find that it is quite a bit more fun than watching grass grow? Due to the fact that you (none of us) know what the weather and rain will be like in advance of your trip i would certainly be ready to potentially fish higher water ie...streamers and nymphs. I would agree with (elk hair) caddis but I would advise a large stimulater which can be rigged with a dropper of course double you chances. It is rare I ever fish only one fly, unlessagain high water streamer pitchin. I would say orange and yellow bodies on the caddis or stim's, by end of april that should be fine. Call and talk to Byron, Paula, or Daniel and they can set you up for sure. I will be like the zillionth person to say this but in the park, presentation is most important period, followed closely by wading(or lack there of) and stealth, followed by pattern. Good Luck!
    If it swims throw a fly at it!

    Barry Murphy
    828-400-3335 (Cell)

    www.projecthealingwaters.org
    "Healing Those Who Serve"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,513

    Default

    At my skill level, if I don't fish nymphs, I don't catch fish. Well, I do use a dry as an indicator, but have never caught a Smoky's trout on it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Andersonville, TN
    Posts
    682

    Default

    I almost always fish a dropper and prefer a prince or Tellico. Dries would be stimulators, para adams & elk hair caddis.
    Jason

    jasonkelkins at yahoo dot com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    43

    Default

    I like a teleco nymph (size 10) with a bhpt, hares ear, or copper john (size 16 or 1 as a trailer. For dries, para adams, stimulator, elk hair caddis or mayby a wulff pattern with a dropper. Good luck and tight lines.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rock Hill, SC
    Posts
    992

    Default

    Flatserious--Taking into consideration there are many variables in weather, stream flow, and the like, here's a list of seven:
    1. Parachute Adams
    2. Elkhair caddis or Deerhair
    3. Royal Wulff or Tennessee Wulff
    4. Inchworm nymph (Greenie Weenie)
    5. Beadhead Prince nymph
    6. Cooper John
    7. Tellico nymph
    I don't list a streamer because I seldom fish them, but they can be mighty effective in high or slightly colored water. Also, I almost always fish a dry fly and dropper tandem. I see there are already a bunch of responses, and in all likelihood one of them has mentioned this. If so, forgive the redundancy, but pattern isn't nearly as important as presentation. Trout in the Smokies are pretty much opportunistic feeders. Also of considerable importance is how you approach fish--low profile, using streamside vegetation or rocks to hide your approach, wearing earth tone clothing, and even avoiding bright lines. I go into great detail on most of this in my book. I would add one final thought--leave your double hauls and long casts behind. Precision and good floats are what matter most here.
    Finally, tight lines!!
    Jim Casada
    www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    The Glades
    Posts
    572

    Default

    i'd take something yellow....yellow always works...add it and drop one of the nymphs...get some yellow sallies or something like it
    I started with nothing, and I have most of it left.
    www.angelfire.com/film/samsfotosafari

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Halifax, VA
    Posts
    771

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    Don't forget a Smoky MT. Blackbird guys!
    <(((>< In tribute to Ben, Duck Hunter extraordinaire, and man's best friend.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    1,127

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    There are guys who fish the park a LOT here and are very much experts. I fish the park a couple times a year and am not an expert. So, with that, take what I am saying with a grain of salt.

    Here's what I use most when I fish in the park and what most of my fish are caught on.

    Adams (various sizes. 14 - 16)
    Bead Head Pheasant Tail
    Hare's ear
    "Green Weenie"
    Elk Hair Caddis
    Any yellow dry fly about size 16.

    In the fast flowing freestone streams in the mountains, size and presentation seems to be more important than color and style. In fact, I would rate presentation above size.

    I haven't found trout in the Smokeys too sensitive about "matching the hatch".

    However, stealth is important, hide behind rocks, stay low, don't wear bright clothing, don't wade out in the stream unless you have to, oh, did I mention stay low? These fish are about as spooky as any I've ever fished.

    Also, getting a good drift on these streams is harder than you may think. Keep casts short (I rarely cast more than the length of my leader and maybe 1 or 2 feet of fly line out) and control your drift. As soon as the fly starts dragging, it's over, pick it up and cast again.

    It's really not hard fishing but it is fairly technical in that the currents in the streams are tricky and one has to really keep a eye out for drift all the while trying to hide behind a rock or squat down on his knees so the fish won't see him.

    This book will help you a lot if you or your friends haven't spent a lot of time fishing in the mountains. Jim has spent a lifetime fishing there and does frequent this board. http://littleriveroutfitters.com/sto...cat=995&page=1

    Hope this helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by flatserious View Post
    Hello all,

    I am planning a trip form myself and seven friends coming up from Florida to come up and backpack and fish at the end of April. I am buying the flies for everyone and for ease of purchase a large quantity against my normal train of thought I was going to bulk up on just a few fly types. SO

    If you could only carry 7 flies, I like odd numbers, into the mountains for all types of trout fishing which would they be. A mix of dry, nymph and maybe a streamer. I may be a dreamer but I am a dreamer on a budget and 25 each of seven fly types is about the max on my budget.

    Thanks in advance.

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