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Thread: Creeling Question

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    546

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    If you really want an education, work with a stream shocking crew or seine a section of stream, get under banks etc. For every fish we see, there are dozens not in feeding lanes or visible to us.

    When and if you keep fish should depend on many factors. In Wyoming, keeping Brookies is greatly encouraged (Invasive there). On some streams, locals encourage keeping Rainbows while releasing the native Cutt's.

    Like Jim said, toss the guts into the stream for the crayfish. Fish guts are a BEAR ATTRACTANT, so don't clean near campsite. If I need to keep the head on for length, be sure to gill them well and clean out any blood immediately. The fish in a creel are kept cool by the evaporation, put some ferns, grass etc in along with them when wetting down (NOT IN PARK !)

    Randall Sale
    the Kytroutbum

  2. #22
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    Jan 2010
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    Mid. TN
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    So, some are saying gut out the trout immediately and some are saying at the end of the day. Does either help to preserve the trout any better than the other?
    John 3:16

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Davidson and Bryson City, NC
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    Maybe we're over-thinking this Birdman. I think keeping the fish cool and moist between the time it's caught and the time it's cooked is much more important than when it's gutted.

    The only argument I can see for gutting it sooner than the end of the day is after several hours of being in a small creel, they will tend to curl up on you a bit - especially a fish that's about as long as your creel. It makes it a little difficult to cut around the curve. Again, the key to minimizing that is to dunk your creel often.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Mooresville,NC
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    91

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    Swallow them whole when you catch them. That way you resolve 2 problems.

    1) bear issue

    2) spoilage issue




  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Lenoir City, TN
    Posts
    107

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldman View Post
    Swallow them whole when you catch them. That way you resolve 2 problems.

    1) bear issue

    2) spoilage issue



    mmmm sushi

  6. #26
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    Mar 2007
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    Davidson and Bryson City, NC
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    After you Rex. Please don't let me stand in your way.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    286

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    Swallowing them whole would work for 99% of the fish I catch! ( No, they're not all 3 inches long - I said 99%! Occasionally I catch a 6 incher! )


    Catch and Release........causes stunted trout.


    *runs and hides under rock...
    www.owljones.com - OwlJones.com - The Internet's Only "Fishertainment" Website

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    105

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldman View Post
    Swallow them whole when you catch them. That way you resolve 2 problems.

    1) bear issue

    2) spoilage issue

    Good suggestion, but... I prefer to smoke 'em on the big green egg at about 200 deg for an hour or so, debone them mix them with a little lemon juice, dijon mustard, garlic, a dash of salt and pepper, a little Italian parsley, and a few capers, spread the whole result on thick slices of baguette, and polish it all off with a bottle of wine (or two). To each his own/. ;-)

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Rock Hill, SC
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    992

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    AKSkim--Although perusal of other replies indicate that fellow forum members have pretty well testified to the validity of what I said, I will add that the statement comes, in addition to having talked with Steve Moore and other biologists over the years, from some six decades of personal experience. With some exceptions, most notably Abrams Creek, Park streams tend to be rather infertile. When you catch a nine- or ten-inch rainbow with a head much bigger than its body, there's a message--the fish is undernourished. I grew up in a household and a culture where "release to grease" was both a way of life and the accepted norm. I might also add that trout were a welcome and often needed item of diet on family tables.
    While I eat far fewer fish than I once did, and probably release 19 out of ever 20 keeping-size trout I catch, I do not have any compunction about creeling fish. Were the situation different, with a fragile resource being potentially harmed by every "kept" fish, it would be different. Fortunately, as I said, the situation is much like that in a farm pond where you actually help things by keeping the bream you catch.
    I would also add that I care deeply about the resource, but at the same time I am keenly attuned to traditional mountain folkways. One of them is consumption of trout, and we are all blessed by the fact that wild trout from the Park can be eaten without any impact on the resource. Indeed, that was a key part of the reasoning behind allowing fishermen to once more keep specks. Steve Moore and others, after considerable study, concluding that man had no significant impact, whether just fishing or keeping fish, on the speck population.
    Others have provided external documentation, but I did want to add that one can, through common sense observation and dues paid in terms of stream time, learn a great deal. One thing I've learned is that eating trout from the Park is environmentally sound as well as being a culinary experience of great delight. In closing, I would add that if you haven't eaten a "mess" of Park trout, fresh caught, you have lived a life with a bit of deprivation. That's why I included a chapter with a number of recipes, along with information on cleaning fish, in my book on the Park.
    That's way too long-winded, but there you have my perspective.
    Jim Casada
    www.jimcasadaoutdoors.com

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tallahassee, Florida
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    906

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    I can only fish the Park one or two times a year now....job and distance....my wife only asks that I bring home enough for her to eat...which I do so I can keep going...I will usually eat a meal of those jewells one night while camping....my grandfather and uncle fished weekly while I spent my youthful summers up there and they usually brought home limits each time they fished and those were eaten with relish...you cannot fish out any of the waters up there....it has been tried....the result of an attempt to fish out the rainbows over at Tremont one summer only resulted in larger and more fish being caught the next year....once the catch and release attitude returned the size of the fish decreased and the cry of too many small fish was heard once again.

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