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Thread: Wha? What the heck? Neversink caddis?

  1. #11
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    from back -> forward........
    1. foam(I cut the foam a little thinner than the store bought which makes it easier to compress. I also taper, V, the end I tie down, which saves room),
    2. deer hair(instead of elk, easier to work with, and crushes easier with thread..) and then the
    3. brown and grizzly hackles.

    make sense?
    I am a great admirer of spectator sports, especially on television; it keeps the riffraff off the trout streams.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnflyfisher View Post
    While this pattern is effective and stays afloat much easier than its non-foam brethren, the name "neversink" was not conceived for its flotation properties. The original name comes from a caddis pattern first developed in the late 1800's for fishing the Neversink River in NY, basically the origin of dry fly fishing. As a NY native, I just wanted to throw that out there...

    Tight Lines,
    As a native redneck I was glad you clarified that for me on the name, cause dang, I thought if you guys had had closed cell foam since the 1800's and we just got it, so I was a getting worried....
    I am a great admirer of spectator sports, especially on television; it keeps the riffraff off the trout streams.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Fly n View Post
    from back -> forward........
    1. foam(I cut the foam a little thinner than the store bought which makes it easier to compress. I also taper, V, the end I tie down, which saves room),
    2. deer hair(instead of elk, easier to work with, and crushes easier with thread..) and then the
    3. brown and grizzly hackles.

    make sense?
    Makes a lot of sense. I think I've been tying it wrong. No wonder mine have been ugly.

  4. #14
    Join Date
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    Smile I seem to have the same problem as Mundele

    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Fly n View Post
    from back -> forward........
    1. foam(I cut the foam a little thinner than the store bought which makes it easier to compress. I also taper, V, the end I tie down, which saves room),
    2. deer hair(instead of elk, easier to work with, and crushes easier with thread..) and then the
    3. brown and grizzly hackles.

    make sense?
    Mine are ugly, but seem to work

    I'm guessing it's the bleached deer hair? I tied several with reg deer hair as I was experimenting earlier this Spring, but found that they were harder to see. When you tie in your deer hair, do you just wrap the brown hackle over the hair you cut off (hiding the head of a reg caddis)?

    My initial problem when tying this fly was that I tied the foam back too far, which lead to more bumps without hook set.

    Thanks for sharing

  5. #15
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    [QUOTE=......Neversink River in NY, basically the origin of dry fly fishing....

    Tight Lines,[/QUOTE]

    tnflyfisher That's interesting fly history but you can't just throw the last part out there..... check your claim of "origin of dry fly fishing".
    Since there's more books written about fly fishing than any other type of fishing one can easily explore flyfishing's history through multi-centuries all over the globe.
    Contemporary internet makes it even easier. Taking a quick look at Wikipedia as a small sample source one can find the following ===>

    "
    Many credit the first recorded use of an artificial fly to the Roman Claudius Aelianus near the end of the 2nd century. He described the practice of Macedonian anglers on the Astraeus River:
    ...they have planned a snare for the fish, and get the better of them by their fisherman's craft. . . . They fasten red . . . wool round a hook, and fit on to the wool two feathers which grow under a cock's wattles, and which in color are like wax. Their rod is six feet long, and their line is the same length. Then they throw their snare, and the fish, attracted and maddened by the color, comes straight at it, thinking from the pretty sight to gain a dainty mouthful; when, however, it opens its jaws, it is caught by the hook, and enjoys a bitter repast, a captive. In his book Fishing from the Earliest Times, however, William Radcliff (1921) gave the credit to Martial (Marcus Valerius Martialis), born some two hundred years before Aelian, who wrote:
    ...Who has not seen the scarus rise, decoyed and killed by fraudful flies..."
    -----------------
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly_fishing

    ----------------
    then there's Egyptian, Japanese, german flyfishing history.

    English writings of flyfishing are quite prolific and most notable in a historic perspective are Dame Juliana Berners descriptions of taking fish on a dry fly and Izaak Walton's Compleat Angler (1653)

    I don't mean to be confrontational tnflyfisher but being a southerner who loves history I just had to throw that out there.

    Cheers,

    al
    Stop continental drift.

  6. #16
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    You know... I figured someone would bring that up.

    I guess I should have been more specific to begin with. Obviously there has been a history of fly fishing for more than the last hundred years... It was the origin of dry fly fishing here in America. At least most NY'ers tend to see it that way... we do have a few famous rivers up there in case you didn't know...

    It was Theodore Gordon who took some English dry flies that didn't seem to work very well over here and started to develop his own patterns to mimic insects found in streams and rivers in NY. It's all good though...

    Tight lines,

  7. #17
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    believe this will clear things up...
    start halfway down the shank with the foam
    These are Whiting hackles Size 14, which on a bare hook, give a great 1.5x (shank to hook) proportion that even Theodore Gordon could appreciate.

    Hook TMC 102Y #15

    Deer hair is non-bleached. Just a great strip I picked up at LRO a couple of years ago.











    PS...the Disciples where some of the first fly fishermen, and John was reported to be a dry fly fisherman.... John 21:3

    Tight Lines
    I am a great admirer of spectator sports, especially on television; it keeps the riffraff off the trout streams.

  8. #18
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    SE Tennessee
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    Interesting thread with a bit of history. Thanks!
    John 21:3 is a most relevant verse but read the rest of the verse.
    V. 3- Simon Peter says to them, I am going to fish. They say to him, We are coming with you. They went forth and embarked in the boat, and in that night they caught nothing.
    I find the last part to be very humorous. Shows those guys weren't any different than us.

  9. #19
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    Smile

    Thanks for the pics, that definately clears things up

  10. #20
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    Let me add "Thanks" for the recipe and pictures. I went fishing yesterday and found my fly inventory needs increased. Will add the NSC to the flybox.

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