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Thread: Hammocks, questions?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, Tn
    Posts
    706

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    Quote Originally Posted by pmike View Post
    You mentioned " (Used straps from a cheap harbor freight ratcheting tie down kit, cut off the metal pieces, work great)" Could you clarify what parts you cut off? Are you saying that you cut off the hooks on the straps from Harbor Freight or the "s" hooks on the tarps?

    It seems like cutting the hooks off the straps would be a good idea and replacing them with some sturdy aluminum carabinars might save a bit of weight IMHO, anything that equates to less carry weight is a big plus to me. There was a time when I could have carried a 50 plus pound pack, but those days are far gone

    Mike
    Here are the straps: http://www.harborfreight.com/set-of-...aps-67386.html

    You just cut the ends off and melt the frays with a lighter. I don't use any caribiners, I take those straps and cut each 12' section into two shorter sections and then tie one end to the hammock and put a permanent loop on one end. The other free strap also get a permanent loop, which I use to pass the free end through around the tree. I then use a Marlin spike hitch on the strap attach to the tree and pass the loop on the strap attached to the hammock over it... all hung tight with no knots to tie.

    I should take a moment here to give credit, the whole step up was shown to me by JayB, he could probably elaborate more in better detail than I can.

    As far as insulation, I use a foam pad from the camping section in walmart ($5) and have always been plenty warm in my hammock. We'll see if I am singing the same tune in two weeks when we go to the top of Big Cataloochie mountain for two nights....

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    223

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    A note on straps...

    Don't use Nylon unless you like waking up with your butt on the ground. they tend to stretch. Polypropylene ones work great and are usually cheaper than nylon. I did break a cheap polypro webbing strap I made from stuff I got at JoAnns though.

    The Shug video talks about Whoopie Slings. They make hanging and adjusting your hammock SO much easier. They're really pretty cool and easy to make if you get the right rope (Amsteel Blue) and do a little splicing. Definitely check those out.

    Also feel free to email me if you have any specific questions: matthew(dot)timbs(at)gmail(dot)com

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    279

    Default Thanks!

    I found a great deal and bought a single nest with net and tarp from Eagles Nest. I have been doing some online searches for info and deals and found a guy locally on Craigslist who sold me a $250.00 dollar gift card for $100.00. I'll check out the videos, they sound quiet interesting and informative.

    I already have a Thermosrest pad so if insulation is needed, I have that pretty much covered.

    Thanks again,
    Mike
    "Fly-fishing has many attributes, but none more pleasing than it's ability to liberate the young boy that still hides within me and to let that boy live again without embarrassment or regret, sorrow or anguish." Harry Middleton

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    138

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    Good Mike!
    I have the singlenest as well, and have no complaints. Hanging is like flyfishing, it can be as simple and cheap or as complicated and expensive as you want it to be.
    All three of my boys are hammock snobs now, so I had to choose the simple and cheap route. Tents? Bah, sleeping on the ground is for uncouth swine. At least that's what it sounds like talking to my 8 year old.

    First thing you want to do with that ENO is take off those heavy carabiners on the ends. You can see in the picture I just put loops in either end of a short piece of webbing and "loop to loop" connected one end of that to the cordage where the 'biners were.
    Another long section of webbing around a tree and as nathan said, use a stick off the ground for a toggle in a marlin spike hitch, and you are set. No metal or plastic hardware anywhere. Super light weight as well. You can see the two stretches of webbing here, as well as the stick holding it together.


    As for keeping warm, a pad may not be as comfortable as lying directly in the hammock, but as of now its more comfortable than the pain in my wallet of buying underquilts. **** I dont even use good pads, I use the $5.88 blue close cell foam pads at walmart (and I cut those in half to make two!). I've done plenty of nights down to the low thirties this way. Im going to experiment with a simple "peapod" made from a $10 sleeping back liner to try to get down to the teens for an upcoming trip.

    Hammockforums.net can be overwhelming at first with so many options and ideas, but there are options there for everyone from the cheapest cheapskate to the dude with money to spend, to hardware and gadget junkies to the boy-scout knot-tying snobs as well.
    Have fun with it, it definitely makes camping a more unique and interesting experience.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, Tn
    Posts
    706

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    Just one more thing to add to that... adding the ridgeline VASTLY improved the comfort of my ENO (actually both my hammocks). Before you take yours out on a trip, spend some time at home setting it up and adjusting it and getting it how you like - it will make things so much easier when you go to use it for the first time in the back country

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maryville Tennessee
    Posts
    229

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    This is a Appalachian Trail hikers site check their posts in the hammock forums there is a wealth of information to be had. I use a bottom entry hennessy ultralight assym....weighs 2lbs but in the cooler months I use what they call a pea pod for a under quilt it's made by jacks or better.

    There is a learning curve to hammocks, how to sleep in them, finding the right trees etc, it's all part of the fun. As someone mentioned earlier the Jaybird Warbonnet is a pretty awesome hammock.

    Check out this site

    www.whiteblaze.net

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    279

    Talking It is amazing how much...

    ...info is out there about hammocks and hammock camping. I just found a "Gand Trunk Ultralight" hammock on Amazon, shipped to me for $17.00 and some change. Thanks for the continued insights, pics, and links, the information is greatly appreciated. I am starting to wonder if maybe there needs to be a board catagory dedicated to Hammocks or perhaps "ultra-light" backpacking "smiling"

    Mike
    "Fly-fishing has many attributes, but none more pleasing than it's ability to liberate the young boy that still hides within me and to let that boy live again without embarrassment or regret, sorrow or anguish." Harry Middleton

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    138

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    I have 2 ultralights, and plan to get another one in the spring. The picture of the kids in the hammocks in my previous post, the top hammock is a GT ultralight. Again, you'll probably want to take a hacksaw to it and get rid of the S hooks on it (I had not done that yet in the picture,shaves off 2 oz). Also I found with the ultralights it is important to get the right amount of sag. The Eno's are more forgiving, but the ultralight can be difficult to find that "comfort zone", so I put structural ridgelines on all of mine, basically just a length of cord tied between the two ends of the hammock so it sags the same amount everytime you hang no matter how tight you pull the suspension. Now it sleeps like a dream everytime. you can see one end of that in the picture as well. I can get you the numbers on the length of my ridgeline if your interested.
    Gt ultralight (minus hooks, plus ridgeline) + 2x 12' harbor freight straps = 16oz
    PU coated tarp (9x9, pictched diamond) + ridgeline+guylines+2 Al stakes = 24oz
    so my whole shelter weight is 2.5 lbs, and it would be less than that if I traded the PU coated tarp for a good silnylon.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    279

    Default Just got some...

    amsteel blue that is in reality gray and am planning to use the 7/64' to make an adjustable ridgeline and some of the 1/8" to make whoopie slings. Let the fun begin....

    Mike
    "Fly-fishing has many attributes, but none more pleasing than it's ability to liberate the young boy that still hides within me and to let that boy live again without embarrassment or regret, sorrow or anguish." Harry Middleton

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    30min from the "Y"
    Posts
    110

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    When it is warm I use a Hennessey Expedition Asym,which is the cheapest one they sell and it is great.The integral mosquito net keeps the bugs off,the fly can be adjusted for max ventilation or lowered for max rain protection,and best of all it keeps you cool on hot nights.The tree saver wraps keep the trees being used from any damage.

    Mine came with free snakeskins that make putting it up or taking it down a simple chore.Like Mundele said it does sleep cool and is not the choice early and late in the season.

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