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Thread: Need immediate help on fly choices and sizes!

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2weightfavorite View Post
    Im in the mountains 4+ days a week right now. 7 1/2 foot leader, no longer than 9 if you feel its too short, and the foam bodies catch fish no doubt. Dont make it compicated. parachute adams, elk hair caddis, prince nymph or a copper john. You also did not metnion where you fished. If you fish lower little river (sinks and below) dont ecpect the number or fish you would catch higher up on the same river. Same goes for alot of the rivers as well. Roaring fork is full of fish and is easy to fish. Baskins creek is small, and unless you are used to that type of fishing you may pass it up for now. With this colder weather you might go to strait nymphing (i would use an indicator) as well.
    How come less fish down lower? Could you explain?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Nashville, TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuskerFlyFisher View Post
    wow, sounds like i fished way too big today. Smoky Mountain Anglers told me 12 to 14s on the phone.
    I really don't think so... but then again, I don't usually fish small flies. Like others have said, it's in the presentation. Lately I have been going to a yellow humpy in size #12 or #14 with great success.

    Also, I routinely use large attractor patterns up to size #6 and still get smaller fish taking a swipe at them, so size really isn't the issue. I just tend to favor throwing a big meal, if you know what I mean...

    Tight Lines,

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    maryville
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    Less fish down lower... I have no scientifical data to back up my opinion on this. However, I do know that the water definitely is warmer in the later summer months down lower. That being said, I do not know why for sure, and others may disaagree with me. It may just be that down lower there are larger deeper pools which make catching some of the trout out of them harder..?? I catch larger rainbows below the sinks and down to the Y, however odly enough I have caught more large browns above the sinks and even miles above elkmont. It seems that down lower there is also less diversity in fish size. Seldom do I catch a 3 inch bow down low, but it happens all the time up higher. I think there could also be less holding water between large holes, which in turn equals less fish. Again, just my own thoughts. Would love to hear others opinions on the subject.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Crossville, TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2weightfavorite View Post
    Less fish down lower... I have no scientifical data to back up my opinion on this. However, I do know that the water definitely is warmer in the later summer months down lower. That being said, I do not know why for sure, and others may disaagree with me. It may just be that down lower there are larger deeper pools which make catching some of the trout out of them harder..?? I catch larger rainbows below the sinks and down to the Y, however odly enough I have caught more large browns above the sinks and even miles above elkmont. It seems that down lower there is also less diversity in fish size. Seldom do I catch a 3 inch bow down low, but it happens all the time up higher. I think there could also be less holding water between large holes, which in turn equals less fish. Again, just my own thoughts. Would love to hear others opinions on the subject.
    I'm with 2weightfavorite on this one. There are fish on lower Little River but they tend to be in specific stretches where the water may be a little cooler for various reasons. Back during the drought years of 2007 and 2008, the pools on lower Little River had dead rainbows on the bottom. When we get several good water years in a row, lower Little River can produce some of the largest rainbows in the Park. In addition, stocker rainbows from Townsend can be caught anywhere up to the Sinks making it occasionally difficult to tell whether a fish is stream-reared or stocked.
    "Then He said to them, 'Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.'" Matthew 4:19

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    The Trout Zone Blog
    contact: TroutZoneAnglers at gmail dot com

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    149

    Default reporting back...

    today we had great success on LeConte Creek with the #14 Yellow Sallys. I caught 5 brookies, son caught 5, granddad caught 1.

    Went up to Elkmont, hiking a mile up from the campground, and I didn't really like it. The water really pushes you around and it's a lot more stressful fishing. Long casts, getting a good drift A LOT harder.

    I spent a lot of my time worrying about my 12 year old son and my dad. You've got to wade through quite a bit of fast, deep water to get to good spots. You fish the good spot, and then you're out there in the middle of the river and have to somehow get back!

    I got two bites while I was there, and my dad caught a 8 inch rainbow.

    They can have all my part of "Elkmont". I guess I'm just not a "big water" fisher - it's a PIA.

    It was also the only place where I actually encountered other fishermen.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Hillbilly Hollow, NC
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    Read Byron's daily fishing report. He gives great advice on flies and sizes and how to fish them
    Last edited by flyman; 04-26-2012 at 12:47 AM. Reason: #42
    "Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it."
    Salvador Dali

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Knoxville, Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuskerFlyFisher View Post

    Went up to Elkmont, hiking a mile up from the campground, and I didn't really like it. The water really pushes you around and it's a lot more stressful fishing. Long casts, getting a good drift A LOT harder.

    I spent a lot of my time worrying about my 12 year old son and my dad. You've got to wade through quite a bit of fast, deep water to get to good spots. You fish the good spot, and then you're out there in the middle of the river and have to somehow get back!

    I got two bites while I was there, and my dad caught a 8 inch rainbow.

    They can have all my part of "Elkmont". I guess I'm just not a "big water" fisher - it's a PIA.

    It was also the only place where I actually encountered other fishermen.
    That's funny
    You pretty much summed up why I prefer the smaller Brookie streams over the big water.

    Although, I'm told, that will all change after you get a hold of a monster Brown or two

    Glad you having a good trip. Nice to see 3 generations fishing together

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